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Frontiers in Decadal Climate Variability: Proceedings of a Workshop (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Frontiers in Decadal Climate Variability: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23552.
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Appendix B
Planning Committee Biographical Sketches

Gerald A. Meehl (Chair) is a Senior Scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. He received his PhD in climate dynamics from the University of Colorado. His research interests include studying the interactions between naturally occurring internal climate variability and changing anthropogenic and natural forcings, particularly in the Indo-Pacific region, and quantifying possible future changes of weather and climate extremes in a warmer climate. He has been an author on all five of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) climate change assessment reports, serving as contributing author (1990), lead author (1995), coordinating lead author (2001, 2007), and most recently lead author on the near-term climate change chapter for the IPCC AR5 that was completed in 2013. He was a recipient of the Jule G. Charney Award of the American Meteorological Society in 2009 and was chair of the National Research Council Climate Research Committee. Meehl is a Fellow of both the American Meteorological Society and the American Geophysical Union and a Visiting Senior Fellow at the University of Hawaii Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research. He serves as co-chair of the Community Earth System Model Climate Variability and Change Working Group, has been a member and co-chair of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Working Group on Coupled Models (WGCM), which coordinates the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) international global climate model experiments addressing anthropogenic climate change, and is currently co-chair of the WCRP Modelling Advisory Council.

Kevin Arrigo is Donald & Donald M. Steel Professor in Earth Sciences, Victoria and Roger Sant Co-Directorship of the Earth Systems Program, at Stanford University where he has been on the faculty since 2005. He conducts laboratory and field studies, remote sensing, and computer modeling techniques to understand phytoplankton dynamics in regions ranging from the Southern Ocean to the Red Sea. In particular, he is interested in the role these organisms play in regulating the uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide by the ocean, as well as in how they help structure marine ecosystems. He received his Ph. D. from the University of Southern California in 1992 and served as a member of the NRC Committee on a Science Plan for the North Pacific Research Board.

Shuyi S. Chen is a Professor of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography at the Rosenthal School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) of the University of Miami. Her research interest focuses on air-sea interactions and tropical meteorology, including hurricanes and coastal hazards. She leads a research group that developed the University of Miami Coupled Model (UMCM), a new-generation, high-resolution, coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model for weather research and prediction. She has been a lead scientist of major observational field campaigns including the Hurricane Rainbands and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) and the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST)Hurricane in the Atlantic, the Impact of Typhoon on the Ocean in the Pacific (ITOP), and the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) over the Indian Oceans. She served as an editor for Weather and Forecasting and on panels of experts that testified in the U. S. Congressional Hearings on weather and climate in 2008 and 2013. She is a Fellow of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Frontiers in Decadal Climate Variability: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23552.
×

the American Meteorological Society. Chen received her PhD from the Pennsylvania State University in 1990.

Lisa Goddard is the Director of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society and an adjunct associate professor within the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences of Columbia University. She has been involved in El Niño and climate forecasting research and operations since the mid-1990s. She has extensive experience in forecasting methodology and has published papers on El Niño, seasonal climate forecasting and verification, and probabilistic climate change projections. Currently leading the IRI’s effort on near-term climate change, Goddard oversees research and product development aimed at providing climate information at the 10-to 20-year horizon and how that low-frequency variability and change interacts with the probabilistic risks and benefits of seasonal-to-interannual variability. Most of Goddard’s research focuses on diagnosing and extracting meaningful information from climate models and available observations. She also developed and oversees a new national postdoctoral program, the Post-docs Applying Climate Expertise Program (PACE), which explicitly links recent climate PhDs with decision-making institutions. Goddard holds a PhD in atmospheric and oceanic sciences from Princeton University and a BA in physics from the University of California at Berkeley.

Robert Hallberg is an oceanographer and the Head of the Oceans and Ice-sheet Processes and Climate Group at NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, and a lecturer on the faculty of Princeton University. He has a PhD in oceanography from the University of Washington and a BA in physics from the University of Chicago. He has spent many years developing isopycnal (density) coordinate ocean models to the point where they are now valuable tools for coupled climate studies, including extensive work on the robustness of the models’ numerical techniques, and on the development or incorporation of parameterizations of a wide range of physical processes. The isopycnal coordinate ocean model that Dr. Hallberg developed provides the physical ocean component of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory’s comprehensive Earth System Model (ESM2G), which was used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s 5th Assessment Report, and its dynamic core is the basis for version 6 of the Modular Ocean Model (MOM6. Hallberg has used global-scale numerical ocean simulations to study topics as varied as the dynamics of Southern Ocean eddies and their role in the ocean’s response to climate, sources of steric sea level rise, and the fate of the deep plumes of methane and oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Hallberg has been actively involved in three ocean Climate Process Teams, studying Gravity Current Entrainment, Eddy-Mixed Layer Interactions, and Internal Wave Driven Mixing. These teams aim to improve the representation of these processes in climate-scale models, based on the best understanding obtained from observations, process studies, and theory. He is currently working on coupling a dynamic ice-sheet and ice-shelf model with high-resolution versions of GFDL’s coupled climate models for improved prediction of sea-level rise.

David Halpern is a Senior Research Scientist at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/California Institute of Technology Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He analyses satellite and in-situ observations to improve understanding of coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction and climate phenomena, such as El Niño and La Niña, intertropical convergence zone, monsoon, and wind-driven ocean upwelling. He developed techniques to record in-situ observations of near-surface meteorological and upper-ocean circulation variables in both shallow and deep-sea environments. He is experienced in ocean circulation and ocean-atmosphere interaction research (more than 300 publications with 50 single- or first-author peer-review papers); has managed national and international programs; has taught graduate and undergraduate courses at the California Institute of Technology, the University of California Los Angeles, and the University of Washington,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Frontiers in Decadal Climate Variability: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23552.
×

and has participated in numerous committees (20 as chair or co-chair, 9 as member of executive board, and 45 as member. Halpern had the privilege to serve in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and NASA’s Earth Science Division. At OSTP, he co-founded the National Science and Technology Council Joint Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology and Task Group on Global Earth Observations. One of his major interests is enhanced integrated global ocean and atmosphere observations and large-scale process-oriented experiments to improve the accuracy of predictions of the global integrated Earth system. Halpern was co-chair of the Group on Earth Observations Science and Technology Committee and currently serves as co-chair of the GEO Data Sharing Working Group. He served two terms on the National Research Council’s Advisory Panel for the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere. He was editor of Geophysical Research Letters and is editor of Eos. Currently, he represents the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission to the Coordination Group for Meteorological Satellites, serves on the Joint Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology Task Team for Satellites, is chair of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) Task Group on the Group on Earth Observations (GEO), and represents the United States in the United Nations Bureau for the World Ocean Assessment. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Geophysical Union, American Meteorological Society, California Academy of Sciences, and International Academy of Astronautics. Halpern received a BSc. honors degree in geology and physics from McGill University and a PhD in physical oceanography from MIT.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Frontiers in Decadal Climate Variability: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23552.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Frontiers in Decadal Climate Variability: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23552.
×
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Frontiers in Decadal Climate Variability: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23552.
×
Page 62
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Frontiers in Decadal Climate Variability: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23552.
×
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Planning Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Frontiers in Decadal Climate Variability: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23552.
×
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Many factors contribute to variability in Earth’s climate on a range of timescales, from seasons to decades. Natural climate variability arises from two different sources: (1) internal variability from interactions among components of the climate system, for example, between the ocean and the atmosphere, and (2) natural external forcings, such as variations in the amount of radiation from the Sun. External forcings on the climate system also arise from some human activities, such as the emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosols. The climate that we experience is a combination of all of these factors.

Understanding climate variability on the decadal timescale is important to decision-making. Planners and policy makers want information about decadal variability in order to make decisions in a range of sectors, including for infrastructure, water resources, agriculture, and energy.

In September 2015, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop to examine variability in Earth’s climate on decadal timescales, defined as 10 to 30 years. During the workshop, ocean and climate scientists reviewed the state of the science of decadal climate variability and its relationship to rates of human-caused global warming, and they explored opportunities for improvement in modeling and observations and assessing knowledge gaps. Frontiers in Decadal Climate Variability summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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