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The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
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Appendix B

Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members

Monty Alger, Pennsylvania State University

Dr. Alger is the director of the Institute for Natural Gas Research at Penn State and professor of chemical engineering. Prior to Penn State, Dr. Alger was vice president and chief technology officer with Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., responsible for research and development. He worked 23 years at General Electric (GE) where he led technology development at the Global Research Center, GE Plastics, and was the technology general manager for the Advanced Materials Business. Before GE, Dr. Alger was an assistant professor and director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Chemical Engineering Practice School stationed at GE Plastics. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his S.M. in Chemical Engineering Practice from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and serves on several external and university chemical engineering advisory councils.

David Allen, The University of Texas at Austin

Dr. Allen is the Gertz Regents Professor of Chemical Engineering and the director of the Center for Energy and Environmental Resources at The University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of 7 books and more than 200 papers. His recent work has focused primarily on air quality, and the engineering of sustainable systems. Dr. Allen has been a lead investigator for multiple air quality measurement studies, which have had a substantial impact on the direction of air-quality policies. Over the past 3 years,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
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with support from Environmental Defense Fund and a group of natural gas producers, he has been leading a team measuring methane emissions from natural gas production sites. He has served on a variety of governmental advisory panels and from 2012 to 2015 chaired the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board. He has won multiple awards for his research and teaching awards at the University of Texas and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Dr. Allen received his B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering, with distinction, from Cornell University in 1979. His M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Chemical Engineering were awarded by the California Institute of Technology in 1981 and 1983, respectively. He has held visiting faculty appointments at the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, Santa Barbara, and the U.S. Department of Energy.

Angela Belcher, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Dr. Belcher attended the University of California, Santa Barbara, for her undergraduate and graduate degrees. She obtained her B.S. in creative studies in 1991 and her Ph.D. in chemistry in 1997, unraveling the ways in which proteins can direct the material properties of minerals. Dr. Belcher joined the Massachusetts Institute of Technology faculty in 2001 as professor in the Departments of Biological Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering. Dr. Belcher’s lab seeks to understand and harness nature’s own processes in order to design technologically important materials and devices for energy, the environment, and medicine. Ancient organisms have evolved to make exquisite nanostructures like shells and glassy diatoms. Using directed evolution, the laboratory engineers organisms to grow and assemble novel hybrid organic-inorganic electronic, magnetic, and catalytic materials. In doing so, the group capitalizes on many of the wonderful properties of biology—using only nontoxic materials, employing self-repair mechanisms, self-assembling precisely and over longer ranges, and adapting and evolving to become better over time. These materials have been used in applications as varied as solar cells, batteries, medical diagnostics, and basic single-molecule interactions related to disease.

Alexis T. Bell, University of California, Berkeley

Dr. Bell is the Dow Professor of Sustainable Energy at the University of California, Berkeley, and faculty senior scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He earned his undergraduate and doctoral degrees at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research specialty is catalysis and chemical reaction engineering. He studies reaction mechanisms in order to identify factors limiting the activity and selectivity of catalysts. Reaction systems being investigated by his group include the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

synthesis of oxygenated compounds from COx (x = 1, 2), the conversion of alkanes to olefins and oxygenated products under oxidizing conditions, and the reduction of nitric oxide under oxidizing conditions. The objectives of his program are pursued through a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. Spectroscopic techniques, including IR, Raman, NMR, UV-Visible, and EXAFS, are used to characterize catalyst structure and adsorbed species under actual conditions of catalysis. Isotopic tracers and temperature-programmed desorption and reaction techniques are used to elucidate the pathways via which catalyzed reactions occur. Quantum chemical calculations are conducted to define the structure and energetics of adsorbed species and the pathways by which such species are transformed. The combined use of theory and experimental methods enables the attainment of a deeper understanding of the core issues of interest than can be achieved by the use of either approach alone. His research honors include the Curtis W. McGraw Award for Research from the American Association of Engineering Education; the Professional Progress, R. H. Wilhelm, and William H. Walker Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers; the Paul H. Emmett Award in Fundamental Catalysis; the Michel Boudart Award for the Advancement of Catalysis from the Catalysis Society; and the American Chemical Society Gabor A. Samorjai Award for Creative Research in Homogeneous or Heterogeneous Catalysis and the Goerge Olah Award in Petroleum or Hydrocarbon Chemistry from the American Chemical Society. Dr. Bell is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He also holds an Honorary Professor title in the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

Jeffery Bricker, Honeywell UOP

Dr. Bricker is the senior director of research at UOP, which conducts research in the areas of new materials, catalysis, advanced characterization, membranes, renewable fuels, and exploratory platforms. He received a B.S. in mathematics and chemistry from Heidelberg University in 1979 and a Ph.D. in chemistry from The Ohio State University in 1983. He started at UOP as a catalyst scientist working in paraffin dehydrogenation, selective hydrogenations, natural gas utilization, and selective oxidation. He has held a variety of positions in refining, petrochemical, and separations research and development, and has had a key role in development of several UOP technologies and products. In his current role, he is accountable for UOP’s longer-range research programs and capabilities development. He has been awarded 55 U.S. patents. He is a member of the North American Catalysis Society and the American Chemical Society.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

He frequently lectures on catalysis around the world. He has received a number of awards including the UOP Stine Star, the 2006 Honeywell Growth and Innovation Award, the 2011 ACS National Award in Creative Invention, and was the 2008 Devon Meek Lecturer

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Tufts University

Dr. Flytzani-Stephanopoulos is Distinguished Professor and the Robert and Marcy Haber Endowed Professor in Energy Sustainability in the School of Engineering at Tufts University. She directs the Tufts Nano Catalysis and Energy Laboratory, which investigates new catalyst materials for the production of hydrogen and “green” chemicals. Pioneering work from her lab has demonstrated the use of single atom catalysts for reactions of interest to fuel processing, which entails efficient and sustainable use of precious metals in clean energy production, and in the commodity and value-added chemicals production with improved yields and reduced carbon footprint. Dr. Flytzani-Stephanopoulos joined the chemical engineering faculty at Tufts in 1994. She holds 10 patents and has written more than 150 technical papers. She has been an editor of the journal Applied Catalysis B: Environmental since 2002, and is an associate editor of Science Advances. She is the recipient of a number of awards, including the Tufts Distinguished Scholar award, the Henry J. Albert Award of the International Precious Metals Institute (IPMI), the Giuseppe Parravano Memorial Award of the Michigan Catalysis Society, the Graduate Teaching and Mentoring Award of the Tufts School of Engineering, and the Carol Tyler Award of the IPMI. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

Anne M. Gaffney, Idaho National Laboratory

Dr. Gaffney received her B.A in chemistry and mathematics from Mount Holyoke College in 1976 and her Ph.D. in physical organic chemistry in 1981. She has been working in the chemical industry for nearly 30 years in areas of process chemistry, catalysis, selective oxidation, “green chemistry,” clean energy, and sustainability. She recently retired from Lummus Technology in March 2010, where she held the position of vice president of technology and was responsible for leading the commercialization of new catalysts and improved metathesis processing of olefins. At Lummus Technology, Dr. Gaffney also developed a new alkylation process called AlkyClean with a “green” heterogeneous catalyst; this process was acknowledged with the 2009 American Chemical Society (ACS) Award for Affordable Green Chemistry. Prior to Lummus Technology, Dr. Gaffney was a senior research fellow, where she worked on developing new catalysts and processes for the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons. Dr.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

Gaffney has more than 200 patents and patent applications, more than 80 publications, and has given close to 90 seminars. She was selected as an ACS Fellow in 2010 and received the ACS Distinguished Service Award in Petroleum Chemistry, also in 2010. She co-founded the Catalysis Division of ACS in 2009. Since her retirement from Lummus Technology, Dr. Gaffney has founded AMG Chemistry and Catalysis Consulting, LLC, co-founded the Langmuir Research Institute, and has consulted for various companies, including Air Liquide, Anellotech, and NanoSelect. In January 2011, she became the research and development director of specialty materials at Invista.

Bruce Gates, University of California, Davis

Dr. Gates studied chemical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley (B.S., 1961), and the University of Washington (Ph.D., 1966), and with a Fulbright grant did postdoctoral research at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich. He worked for 2 years as a research engineer at Chevron Research Company and began as an assistant professor at the University of Delaware in 1969, becoming the H. Rodney Sharp Professor of Chemical Engineering and Professor of Chemistry. In 1992, he joined the University of California, Davis, where he is Distinguished Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science. He has spent 4 sabbatical years at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich and was recently a guest professor at Hokkaido University. Dr. Gates’s research is focused on catalysis, with an emphasis on essentially molecular metal complex and metal cluster catalysts anchored to solid surfaces and on catalytic conversion of biomass-derived compounds. He authored the textbook Catalytic Chemistry and co-authored Chemistry of Catalytic Processes. He edits the monograph Advances in Catalysis. He serves on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Board. He has been recognized with awards from the American Chemical Society, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the North American Catalysis Society, and the Council for Chemical Research. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Karen Goldberg, University of Washington

Dr. Goldberg received her A.B. degree in 1983 from Barnard College of Columbia University in New York City. She did undergraduate research with Professors Roald Hoffmann (Cornell University) and Stephen Lippard (Columbia University) and with Drs. Tom Graedel and Steven Bertz (AT&T Laboratories). She then went on to the University of California, Berkeley, where she earned her Ph.D. in chemistry in 1988 with Professor Robert Bergman. Following a postdoctoral year with Professor Bruce Bursten (The Ohio State University), she joined the faculty at

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

Illinois State University, a primarily undergraduate institution, in 1989. In 1995, she moved to the University of Washington in Seattle as assistant professor of chemistry. She was awarded tenure and promoted to associate professor in 2000. In 2003, she was promoted to full professor, in 2007 was named Lawton Distinguished Scholar in Chemistry, and in 2010 became the Nicole A. Boand Endowed Professor of Chemistry. Dr. Goldberg currently serves as director of the NSF Phase II Center for Chemical Innovation, the Center for Enabling New Technologies through Catalysis (CENTC), a collaborative effort among 19 principal investigators and their students at 14 institutions across North America (www.nsfcentc.org). CENTC also has an industrial affiliates program involving major chemical, petrochemical, and pharmaceutical companies. She has served on the Advisory Boards of the American Chemical Society (ACS) journals Inorganic Chemistry, and Accounts of Chemical Research and Organometallics, and as co-chair of the 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Green Chemistry. Dr. Goldberg also serves as a member of the Chemistry Selection Committee for Sloan Research Fellowships. She was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the Washington State Academy of Science in 2012. In 2015, she received the Carol Tyler Award from the International Precious Metal Institute and received the 2016 ACS Award in Organometallic Chemistry in March 2016. Dr. Goldberg is best known for her work developing mechanistic understanding of fundamental organometallic reactions.

T. Brent Gunnoe, University of Virginia

Dr. Gunnoe is a professor of chemistry at the University of Virginia. With a focus on the environmental and economic challenges of developing more efficient synthetic methods, his research interests span the fields of inorganic and organic chemistry. His research group focuses on the preparation and characterization of new transition-metal complexes that are capable of activating organic molecules toward novel reactivity. By concentrating on fundamental aspects of inorganic and organometallic chemistry, his efforts are ultimately directed toward the rational design of single-site catalysts that form the foundation of new homogeneous synthetic methodologies. Dr. Gunnoe’s publications are extensive and have appeared in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Inorganic Chemistry, and Dalton Transactions, among many others. He received his B.A. from West Virginia University and his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Klaus Harth, Badische Anilin und Soda Fabrik (BASF)

Dr. Harth is vice president for environmental catalysis research at BASF. He is currently responsible for the global research and development

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

(R&D) of BASF’s Mobile Emissions Catalyst business, which is located in Iselin, New Jersey. Prior to this role, he was vice president for process catalysis research, for BASF SE in Ludwigshafen, Germany, and served as divisional technology officer for BASF’s Petrochemical Division. Since joining BASF in 1987, he has worked in different R&D and business roles including an assignment as regional business manager for catalysts in Hong Kong, China. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany.

Richard Helling, The Dow Chemical Company

Dr. Helling is director of sustainable chemistry for The Dow Chemical Company, located in Midland, Michigan. He leads the Sustainable Chemistry expert community at Dow, which supports Dow businesses on the use of lifecycle assessment (LCA), the Sustainable Chemistry Index (SCI), and related tools to identify opportunities for innovation, differentiating products in the marketplace, and creating sustainable value for Dow. He was a member of the State of Michigan’s Green Chemistry Roundtable and the Green Chemistry & Commerce Council, and is currently on the board of the American Center for Life Cycle Assessment and active in working groups of The Sustainability Consortium. Dr. Helling joined Dow in 1987 and has held a variety of roles in process research, development, and manufacturing. He developed and improved technologies at Dow’s Pittsburg, California, manufacturing site for waste reduction, reaction selectivity, and purification of chlorinated pyridines that are used in a broad range of Dow AgroSciences products, becoming the leader for Process and Environmental Technology in Pittsburg. He led the process development for SiLK™ dielectric materials in Midland, Michigan, and was the Dow AgroSciences European contract synthesis leader and fungicides technology leader when based in Drusenheim, France. He returned to Midland in 2003, when he began his use of LCA to complement economic evaluations of new technologies, especially the use of renewable feedstocks for chemical production, becoming an associate research and development director. Dr. Helling holds a bachelor’s degree from Harvey Mudd College, with majors in engineering and history, a master’s degree in chemical engineering practice from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and a doctorate in chemical engineering, also from MIT. He was an assistant professor with the MIT Chemical Engineering Practice School prior to joining Dow. He is an author of 23 papers, holds 2 patents, is a registered professional engineer in Michigan, and is an LCA Certified Professional.

Mark Jones, The Dow Chemical Company

Dr. Jones, currently executive external strategy and communications

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

fellow for The Dow Chemical Company, reporting directly to Dr. A.N. Sreeram, corporate vice president of research & development (R&D). Since assuming this role in September 2011, supporting then Dow chief technology officer Bill Banholzer, Dr. Jones has performed technical assessments, developed external communications, and enhanced Dow efforts in external awards. He is a frequent speaker at a variety of industry events on various industry-related topics. He continues to provide technical support for Dow’s Renewable Chemistries Expertise Center. He is on the Board of Directors of the BIO Industrial and Environmental Section (IES), and frequent contributor to both American Chemistry Council and World Economic Forum teams focused on renewable and sustainable chemistry. He represents Dow Chemical on the American Chemical Society (ACS) Corporation Associates, hosts ACS webinars with some regularity, and regularly blogs for the ACS’s Industry Insights. The White House’s Advanced Manufacturing Partnership has been a recent focus, looking both at technology options and improving scale-up of new technologies. Dr. Jones has recently assumed responsibility for next-generation sustainability goals associated with innovation. He spent most of his career developing catalytic processes. He is currently a member of a National Research Council team reviewing the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) program. He is a co-author on the National Research Council report Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States. Dr. Jones joined Dow in 1990 following a graduate career that had very little to do with his ultimate career path. After graduating with a B.S. in chemistry from Randolph-Macon College, he received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry with Barney Ellison at the University of Colorado Boulder, where he studied gas-phase ion molecule chemistry—not an area of great industrial interest. Dr. Jones was introduced to catalysis during his postdoctoral research with Bruce Koel, then at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science in Boulder. He spent his early career in the catalysis department in what is now Core R&D. He left Core R&D in 2006 to take the Strategy Fellow role in Hydrocarbons, Energy, and Basic Chemicals. He is the author of more than 12 issued U.S. patents and numerous publications.

Mattheos Koffas, Renesselaer Polytechnic Institute

Dr. Koffas is the Dorothy and Fred Chau ‘71 Endowed Professor in the departments of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Biological Sciences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the Career Development Professor of the Biocatalysis Constellation at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute since 2011. He received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 2001, where he worked on amino acid biosynthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum. He was a visiting research scientist at

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

DuPont Central Research from 2001 to 2002. During that time, he worked on developing a process for the conversion of natural gas to high-value chemicals. Dr. Koffas joined the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at SUNY Buffalo in 2002 as tenure-track assistant professor and was promoted to associate professor in 2008. He works in the field of metabolic engineering and systems biotechnology with particular emphasis on the biosynthesis of natural products. Some of his work includes the biosynthesis of high-value phytochemicals such as polyphenols, the production of mammalian polysaccharides with pharmaceutical and nutraceutical properties, and the development of electrobiochemical reactors for the production of reducing equivalents. Dr. Koffas currently serves on the editorial board of several journals, including Current Opinion in Biotechnology, BMC Plant Biology, Metabolic Engineering Communications and Biotechnology, and Bioprocess Engineering. He has published more than 70 peer-review papers and holds a number of patents some of which have been commercialized.

Angeliki Lemonidou, Aristotle University

Professor Lemonidou is professor of chemical engineering at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and director of the Petrochemical Technology Laboratory. She got her Ph.D. with honors from the Chemical Engineering Department in 1990. Her thesis, titled “Catalytic Steam Cracking for Ethylene Production,” was supervised by Professor Iacovos Vasalos. Since then she has served the same department from many positions as lecturer, assistant professor, and associate professor. Professor Lemonidou is deputy head of the newly founded Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Innovation of Aristotle University and a collaborating faculty member of the Chemical Process Energy Resources Institute (CPERI/CERTH). Professor Lemonidou has developed long collaborations with universities and research centers in Greece and also with international universities, such as the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Delaware. Professor Lemonidou’s research activities are the area of catalysis and more specifically on the development of active and selective nano-structured materials for reactions related to transformation of hydrocarbons and bio-based compounds. The target reactions she currently studies are the selective oxidation of lower alkanes, the sustainable production of hydrogen through advanced steam reforming of natural gas, the CO2 capture, and the hydrodeoxygenation of biomass derived oxygenates. Her expertise lies in the preparation of nanomaterials via advanced preparation techniques, the structural and morphological characterization using various physicochemical techniques, as well as detailed kinetic and mechanistic studies of catalytic materials under reaction conditions. She has made

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

substantial contributions with the work of her group on ethane oxidative dehydrogenation and the in-depth study of the Ni-Nb-Ox catalytic materials for the reaction. She has numerous publications (more than 100) in scientific journals and conference proceedings. Her work has been highly appreciated by the scientific community with more than 3,500 citations and h-factor 35. Professor Lemonidou has been invited as keynote speaker to many conferences and academic institutions to deliver lectures, has organized national and international conferences, and has served as a member of editorial boards and as a guest editor of peer-review journals. She is national delegate from Greece at the European Federation of Catalysis Societies and a member at large of the European Federation of Catalysis Societies Council.

Johannes A. Lercher, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Dr. Lercher, studied chemistry at Technische Universität Wein (TU Wien), receiving his Ph.D. in 1981 at the same institution. After a visiting lectureship at Yale University, he joined TU Wien as a lecturer, and later an associate professor. In 1993, he was appointed professor in the Department of Chemical Technology at the University Twente, the Netherlands, and in 1998 in the Department of Chemistry of TU München, Germany. Since 2011 he has served as director of the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He is an external member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and a member of the Academia Europae and the European Academy of Sciences, as well as honorary professor at several institutions in China. Author of about 510 papers and 17 patents, he is currently president of the European Federation of Catalysis Societies and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Catalysis. Recent awards include the Kozo Tanabe Award for Acid-Base Catalysis, the Robert Burwell Lectureship of the North American Catalysis Society, the Francois Gault Lectureship of the Federation of European Catalysis Societies, and the R.B. Anderson Award of the Canadian Catalysis Society. His interests are related to catalysis in zeolites as well as on nanostructured oxides and sulfides, focusing on bifunctional and concerted catalysis, as well as understanding the influence of the steric and chemical environment on the properties of active centers in a catalytic site.

Jan Lerou, Jan Lerou Consulting, LLC

Dr. Lerou is principal of Jan Lerou Consulting, LLC, which offers consulting in a wide variety of heterogeneous catalytic processes. He has more than 40 years of experience in chemical reaction engineering in academia, large chemical industries, and start-up companies. He is also adjunct professor of chemical engineering at The Pennsylvania State University. He recently retired as group chief technology officer of Oxford Catalysts,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

Ltd., and Velocys, Inc., subsidiaries of Oxford Catalysts Group, PLC (now Velocys, PLC).

Tobin Marks, Northwestern University

Dr. Marks is Vladimir N. Ipatieff Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University, and Distinguished Adjunct Professor at Texas A&M University at Qatar and at Korea University. He received a B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of Maryland (1966) and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1971) in inorganic chemistry. His research interests include transition metal and f element organometallic chemistry; catalysis; vibrational spectroscopy; synthetic facsimiles of metalloprotein active sites; carcinostatic metal complexes; solid state chemistry and low-dimensional molecular metals; nonlinear optical materials; polymer chemistry; tetrahydroborate coordination chemistry; macrocycle coordination chemistry; molecular electro-optics; metal-organic chemical vapor deposition; polymerization catalysis; printed flexible electronics; solar energy; and transparent conductors. Dr. Marks has received numerous American Chemical Society National Awards including MacDiarmid Medal, University of Pennsylvania, 2013; Wilkinson Medal, Royal Society of Chemistry U.K., 2014; Sacconi Medal, Italian Chemical Society, 2015; Materials for Industry Award, Royal Society of Chemistry U.K., 2015; and Honorary Foreign Member, Chinese Chemical Society. Dr. Marks received a doctor of science degrees honoris causa from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 2011, the University of South Carolina in 2011, and The Ohio State University in 2012. Peer-reviewed publications: 1,155; h-index = 136 on 71,000 citations; issued U.S. patents: 234.

Bob Maughon, The Dow Chemical Company

Dr. Maughon is the research and development (R&D) vice president for performance plastics and hydrocarbons at The Dow Chemical Company. Prior to this role, he was the senior R&D director for Dow Pharma & Food Solutions in the Functional Materials Business Group. Dr. Maughon began his career with Dow in 1998, working in the central research laboratories on a variety of programs ranging from heterogeneous hydrogenation catalysis, ring-opening polymerization, and homogeneous catalysis. In 2004, he assumed leadership for the chemical feedstocks research area, focusing on breakthrough technologies for utilization of methane and coal as Dow feedstocks for olefins. He subsequently became the technical leader for the catalytic chemistry group of Core R&D in 2005. In 2006, he was named the director of inorganic chemistry & catalysis, where he was responsible for leading inorganic chemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, and high-throughput research with responsibilities for the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

development of new technologies for chemical and renewable feedstocks and advantaged catalytic processes. From 2008 to 2010, he served as the lead R&D director for the Hydrocarbons and Energy Business. He is director and president of Dow International Technology Corporation and director of the Union Carbide Polyolefins Development Company, Impact Analytical, and the Council of Chemical Research. He also serves on the University of Michigan Engineering Advisory Council. Dr. Maughon earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Rice University in 1993 and his doctorate in organic chemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 1998.

Eric McFarland, University of California, Santa Barbara

After his undergraduate studies in nuclear engineering at University of California, Berkeley, Dr. McFarland moved to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he studied nuclear science and completed his Ph.D., investigating the measurement of complex chemical reaction kinetics using nuclear phenomena. While a graduate student, Dr. McFarland was a member of a team at Field Effects, Inc., that designed and built the first permanent ring magnet–based magnetic resonance imaging system. He received an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and, after post-graduate training in general surgery, worked part-time in Emergency Medicine. He joined the Department of Nuclear Engineering at MIT and then later moved to the University of California, Santa Barbara, where his research interests moved to chemical kinetics and catalysis specifically related to energy production. He recently completed a 2-year position as the inaugural director of the Dow Centre for Sustainable Engineering Innovation and Dow Chemical Chair in Chemical Engineering at the University of Queensland. He has broad-ranging research interests with direct links to industrial problems and has published more than 170 papers and is the inventor on more than 30 patents. Dr. McFarland has taken several leaves of absence from the University to work in industry. He was a founding technical director of Symyx Technologies, and as a member of the management team, helped grow the company from 3 to more than 150 employees and eventually a successful public offering. He has been on the board of directors of several chemical and technology companies and served for 8 years as president and CEO of GRT, Inc., a technology company developing a new process for the production of liquid fuels and chemicals from natural gas and as president and CEO of an advanced battery startup.

Carl Mesters, Shell International Exploration & Production, Inc.

Dr. Mesters is a Dutch national. He joined Shell in 1984, where he currently works as managing researcher in PTI/D at the Shell Technology Center

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

in Houston. In 2005, he was appointed Shell’s chief scientist for chemistry and catalysis. He has been active in catalysis and process research and development (R&D) across many areas, including selective catalytic reduction of NOx, ethylene oxide, gas-to-liquids, catalytic dewaxing, aromatic hydrogenation, and xylene isomerization, among others, resulting in more than 70 patents filed; and is currently working on heavy oil conversion and gas to chemicals. Dr. Mesters has been chairman of the Catalysis Society of the Royal Dutch Chemical Society. He holds a degree in physical and inorganic chemistry from the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands, where he also completed a research Ph.D.

Guido Pez, Consultant

Dr. Pez was born in Italy but acquired most of his education in Australia. He graduated with a Ph.D. in chemistry from Monash University and following a postdoc in Canada he joined Allied Chemical (now Honeywell), then worked for most of his career at Air Products & Chemicals (Allentown, Pennsylvania), where he held the position of chief scientist in inorganic chemistry, until he retired in 2009. Dr. Pez has authored or co-authored 78 scientific publications; he is named as an inventor on 64 U.S. patents and was the recipient in 1994 of the American Chemistry Society Award in Inorganic Chemistry. His research interests have ranged from catalysis, gas separations, fluorine chemistry, hydrogen storage, and electrochemistry in the context of new electrolytes for phosphoric acid fuel cells and Li ion batteries. In now his “second career,” he has taught inorganic chemistry at Barnard College of Columbia University, and is continuing to pursue his research interests in catalysis and electrochemistry.

Reinhard Schomäcker, Technische Universität Berlin

Dr. Schomäcker studied chemistry at the University of Bielefeld. He received his diploma in 1984 and a doctoral degree in physical chemistry in 1987. In 1990, he finished a habilitation thesis at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen. Also in 1990, he joined the chemical engineering group of the Central Research Laboratories of the Bayer AG in Leverkusen. In 1992, Dr. Schomäcker became Privatdozent for physical chemistry at the University of Cologne in addition to his appointment with the Bayer AG. Since 1996 he has served as professor of technical chemistry at the Technische Universität Berlin (TU Berlin). His major research interests are catalysis, reaction engineering, and colloidal systems. With projects in these fields, his research group is involved in the cluster of excellence UNICAT and different collaborative research centers funded by the German Research Foundation. In research and university administration, he served as managing director of the chemistry department of TU Berlin and head of the graduate school BIG-NSE.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

Shannon Stahl, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Dr. Stahl is a John and Dorothy Vozza Research Professor of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. The central theme of his research group is catalysis, with an emphasis on catalytic aerobic oxidation reactions. This work includes the discovery, development, and mechanistic characterization of catalytic methods for selective oxidation of organic chemicals with O2. His research program includes a focus on the chemistry of molecular oxygen related to energy conversion, including fuel cells and solar energy conversion. He was an undergraduate at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. His subsequent training at the California Institute of Technology (Ph.D., 1997), where he was a National Science Foundation (NSF) Predoctoral Fellow with Prof. John E. Bercaw, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (postdoc, 1997-1999), where he was an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow with Prof. Stephen J. Lippard, focused on selective oxidation of methane to methanol.

Gregory Stephanopoulos, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Dr. Stephanopoulos is the W.H. Dow Professor of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He received his B.S. from the National Technical University of Athens, his M.S. from the University of Florida, and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, all in chemical engineering. He joined, upon finishing his doctorate in 1978, the chemical engineering faculty of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and in 1985 he was appointed professor of chemical engineering at MIT, where he has been ever since. He served as associate director of the Biotechnology Process Engineering Center (1990-1997) and member of the International Faculty of the Technical University of Denmark (2001-2005). He was also the Taplin Professor of HST (2001-2012), and serves presently as instructor of bioengineering at HMS (1997-present). Dr. Stephanopoulos’s current research focuses on metabolic engineering and its applications to the production of fuels, biochemicals, and specialty chemicals, as well as mammalian cell physiology as it pertains to diabetes and metabolism. Dr. Stephanopoulos has coauthored or edited 5 books and more than 400 papers and 50 U.S. patents. He has supervised 110 graduate postdoctoral students and is the editor-in-chief of the journal Metabolic Engineering and Current Opinion in Biotechnology; he also serves on the editorial boards of seven scientific journals. He has delivered approximately 30 named lectures and has been recognized with many awards, including the William H. Walker Award of the American Institute of Chemical Engineering (AIChE) (2014); the John Fritz Medal of AAES (2013); the Eni Prize in Renewable Energy (2011); the ACS E.V. Murphree Award (2010); the AIChE Founders (2007) and Wilhelm (2001) Awards; and the Merck (2002), Amgen (2009), and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

George Washington Carver (2010) Awards. He was elected member of the National Academy of Engineering in 2003 and corresponding member of the Academy of Athens in 2011, and is serving presently as president of AIChE. Prof. Stephanopoulos has taught a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses at Caltech and MIT and co-authored the first textbook on the subject of metabolic engineering. He introduced and directed three MIT summer courses on the subjects of metabolic engineering (1995-1999), bioinformatics (2000-2004) and biomass-to-biofuels conversion (2008-present). He is a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, AIChE, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

James Stevens, The Dow Chemical Company (retired)

Dr. Stevens recently retired as the Dow Distinguished Fellow in the Core Research and Development Department of The Dow Chemical Company, where he worked for more than 35 years. Distinguished Fellow is the highest technical position at Dow. His primary field of research is in the area of new polymeric materials, catalysts, and the high-throughput discovery of organometallic single-site catalysts. Dr. Stevens is an inventor on more than 100 issued U.S. patents, more than 1,100 global patents, 18 publications, and two books. He has won a Dow Inventor of the Year Award five times, and was presented the Dow Central Research Excellence in Science Award. Other awards he has received include the United States National Inventor of the Year Award; the American Chemical Society (ACS) Delaware Section Carothers Award; the ACS Award in Industrial Chemistry; the Herbert H. Dow Medal, the highest honor Dow awards to the company’s scientists and researchers; the Perkin Medal; and the 2011 North American Catalysis Society Houdry Award. Dr. Stevens received a B.A. in chemistry from The College of Wooster in 1975. He obtained a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from The Ohio State University in 1979. He is an advisor on the National Science Foundation Center for Chemical Innovation in Solar Fuels based at the California Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering; the Academy of Medicine, Engineering, and Science of Texas; and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Bala Subramaniam, University of Kansas

Dr. Subramaniam is the Dan F. Servey Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at The University of Kansas (KU). Dr. Subramaniam earned a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Madras, India, and his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Notre Dame. He has also held visiting professorships at the University of Nottingham, United Kingdom, and the Institute of Process Engineering, ETH, Zürich,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
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Switzerland. Dr. Subramaniam’s research interests are in catalysis, reaction engineering, and crystallization. In particular, his research harnesses the pressure-tunable physicochemical properties of unconventional solvents such as supercritical fluids and gas-expanded liquids in multiphase catalysis to develop resource-efficient technologies with reduced environmental footprint. He has more than 160 publications and 27 issued U.S. patents, and has edited 2 books. He is the founding director of the Center for Environmentally Beneficial Catalysis (CEBC), a unique university/industry consortium that is developing and providing licensing opportunities for novel sustainable technologies related to fuels and chemicals. Dr. Subramaniam is associate editor of the American Chemical Society Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering journal and chair-elect of the 2018 Gordon Research Conference on Green Chemistry. He has also served as president of the International Symposia in Chemical Reaction Engineering (ISCRE, Inc.) and serves on the board of directors of the Organic Chemical Reactions Society (OCRS). His honors include ASEE’s Dow Outstanding Young Faculty Award, Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers’ Chemcon Lectureship Award, and KU’s Higuchi Research Achievement Award. Dr. Subramaniam is a Fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineering, the ACS Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Division, and the National Academy of Inventors.

Israel Wachs, Lehigh University

In a career spanning three decades, Dr. Wachs has earned international renown for research into heterogeneous catalysis. His research focuses on the catalysis science of mixed-metal oxides (supported metal oxides, bulk metal oxides, polyoxometalates, zeolites, and molecular sieves) for numerous catalytic applications (selective oxidation for manufacture of value-added chemicals), environmental catalysis (selective catalytic reduction of NOx and SOx), hydrocarbon conversion by solid acid catalysts for increased fuel energy content, olefin metathesis for on-demand production of scarce propylene, olefin polymerization, conversion of methane to liquid aromatic fuels, biomass pyrolysis, water-gas shift for production of clean hydrogen, and photocatalytic splitting of water to clean hydrogen. The research aims to identify the catalytic active sites present on the heterogeneous catalyst surface to allow establishment of fundamental structure-activity/selectivity relationships that will guide the rational design of advanced catalysts. The research approach taken by the Wachs group is to simultaneously monitor the surface of the catalyst with spectroscopy under reaction conditions and online analysis of reactant conversion and product selectivity with online GC/mass spectrometer analysis. This new methodology has been termed “operando spectroscopy” and is allowing for the unprecedented development of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

molecular-level structure-activity/selectivity relationships for catalysts. The spectroscopic techniques employed by the Wachs group for determination of the catalytic active sites and surface reaction intermediates are Raman, infrared (IR), ultra violet–visible (UV–vis), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES/EXAFS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR). Isotopic labeling of deuterium, oxygen-18 and carbon-13 is also used to track reaction pathways, determine rate-determining steps and distinguish between spectator species and actual surface reaction intermediates. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has honored Dr. Wachs with a Clean Air Excellence Award for a catalytic process he invented that converts paper-mill pollutants into formaldehyde. The American Chemical Society (ACS) has given Dr. Wachs the George A. Olah Award for achievements in hydrocarbon and petroleum chemistry, and the American Institute of Chemical Engineering (AIChE) has honored him with the Catalysis and Reaction Engineering Division Practice Award. He is the recipient of multiple awards from local catalysis societies (Michigan, New York, Chicago, and Philadelphia). In 2011, he was named a Fellow of the ACS, the highest honor bestowed by the society. In 2012, he was recognized by the German Alexander von Humbolt Foundation with a Humboldt Research Award, and the International Vanadium Chemistry Organization with its Vanadis Award. Dr. Wachs has published more than 300 highly cited technical articles (approximately 24,000 citations and h-index of approximately 90) and holds more than 36 U.S. patents.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Organizing Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Changing Landscape of Hydrocarbon Feedstocks for Chemical Production: Implications for Catalysis: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23555.
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Next: Appendix C: Participant List »
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A decade ago, the U.S. chemical industry was in decline. Of the more than 40 chemical manufacturing plants being built worldwide in the mid-2000s with more than $1 billion in capitalization, none were under construction in the United States. Today, as a result of abundant domestic supplies of affordable natural gas and natural gas liquids resulting from the dramatic rise in shale gas production, the U.S. chemical industry has gone from the world’s highest-cost producer in 2005 to among the lowest-cost producers today.

The low cost and increased supply of natural gas and natural gas liquids provides an opportunity to discover and develop new catalysts and processes to enable the direct conversion of natural gas and natural gas liquids into value-added chemicals with a lower carbon footprint. The economic implications of developing advanced technologies to utilize and process natural gas and natural gas liquids for chemical production could be significant, as commodity, intermediate, and fine chemicals represent a higher-economic-value use of shale gas compared with its use as a fuel.

To better understand the opportunities for catalysis research in an era of shifting feedstocks for chemical production and to identify the gaps in the current research portfolio, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine conducted an interactive, multidisciplinary workshop in March 2016. The goal of this workshop was to identify advances in catalysis that can enable the United States to fully realize the potential of the shale gas revolution for the U.S. chemical industry and, as a result, to help target the efforts of U.S. researchers and funding agencies on those areas of science and technology development that are most critical to achieving these advances. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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