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Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
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Appendix B

Committee and Staff Biographies

S. James Adelstein, Ph.D., M.D. (NAM), Chair, is the Paul C. Cabot Distinguished Professor of Medical Biophysics (Emeritus) at Harvard Medical School and a nuclear medicine specialist. His research interests include radionuclide dosimetry, the molecular and cellular effects of radiation, and the diagnosis and experimental treatment of cancer using radionuclides. He is a member of several professional organizations, including the Radiation Research Society and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, and he is an elected fellow of both the American College of Nuclear Medicine and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was chair of the National Academies Board on Radiation Effects Research from 2002 to 2005 and vice chair of the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board from 2005 to 2009, and he served on several National Academies committees. He also has served on public and private committees that have addressed issues concerning radiation protection, research collaboration, and biomedical isotopes. He received a B.S., an M.S., and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.D. from the Harvard Medical School. He served as dean for academic programs at Harvard Medical School from 1978 to 1998. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine (now the National Academy of Medicine) in 1985.

Thomas J. Ruth, Ph.D., Vice-Chair, is emeritus senior research scientist at TRIUMF and emeritus senior scientist at the British Columbia Cancer Research Centre. He holds adjunct professorships in chemistry at Simon Fraser University, physics at the University of Victoria, and medicine at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Ruth is a leader in the production

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×

and application of radioisotopes for research in the physical and biological sciences. He has served on a multitude of national and international committees, including the National Academies Committee on Biomedical Isotopes (1993-1995), Committee on State of the Science in Nuclear Medicine (2006-2007), Committee on Medical Isotope Production without Highly Enriched Uranium (2007-2009), and Committee on an Assessment and Outlook for Nuclear Physics (2010-2012). He currently serves as an expert on radioisotope production for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and was appointed by the IAEA director general to serve on the Standing Advisory Group on Nuclear Applications. He previously served on the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee’s (NSAC’s) Subcommittee on Isotopes for the Nuclear Physics Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (2009 and 2014) and on another NSAC subcommittee to review the National Nuclear Security Administration’s program for removing highly enriched uranium from civilian use and supporting the development of U.S. sources of molybdenum-99. Dr. Ruth has published more than 290 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters. He received an M.A. in nuclear chemistry from the College of William and Mary and a Ph.D. in nuclear spectroscopy from Clark University. He is the 2011 recipient of the Michael J. Welch Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine for his contributions to radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In 2015, along with five of his colleagues, Dr. Ruth received the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada’s Brockhouse Award for their work in producing Tc-99m using medical cyclotrons.

Lin-Wen Hu, Ph.D., is director for research and services and principal research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL), which operates the 6-megawatt MIT Research Reactor (MITR). Dr. Hu directs NRL’s research and utilization program and leads the development, design, and safety reviews of major reactor irradiation facilities and experiments. She also serves as MITR’s technical lead for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Test Reactor National User Facility at Idaho National Laboratory, of which MITR is a partner facility; as the group leader of the research and test reactors working group of the nuclear technology subcommittee of International Standards Organization (ISO/TC85/SC6/WG2); and as a steering committee member of the International Group of Research Reactors. Her research interests include advanced nuclear energy systems; research reactor design, safety analysis, and applications in advanced fuel and materials irradiations; radioisotope production; and enhanced heat transfer of engineered fluids and nanostructure materials. Current research projects include the MITR low enriched uranium fuel conversion study and fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor development. Dr. Hu is a licensed professional

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×

engineer in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and previously held a senior reactor operator license for the MITR. She has been active in the Isotope and Radiation (IRD) professional division of the American Nuclear Society since 1996 and is currently a member of the IRD Executive Committee. She has authored or coauthored more than 190 peer-reviewed journal papers, conference papers, and technical reports. She received an S.M. and a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from MIT.

Joseph C. Hung, Ph.D., is professor of pharmacy and professor of radiology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, and consultant and director of radiopharmaceutical operations and enterprise Food and Drug Administration responsible official, Mayo Clinic. He is certified by the American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine (certified as a nuclear medicine scientist in radiopharmaceuticals and radiochemistry) and by the Board of Pharmaceutical Specialties (certified as a nuclear pharmacist). Dr. Hung has served as chair of the Nuclear Pharmacy Practice Section, Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management, American Pharmacists Association (APhA); president of the Chinese American Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM); chair of the Committee on Pharmacopeia, SNM; and acting chair of the Expert Committee on Radiopharmaceuticals and Imaging Agents, United States Pharmacopeia. He was inducted as a fellow of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists in 1995 and as an APhA fellow in 1996. He received a B.S. in pharmacy from Taipei Medical University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in nuclear pharmacy from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

Robert T. Jubin, Ph.D., is project manager for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies—Material Recovery and Waste Form Development Programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He has more than 40 years of experience with nuclear fuel reprocessing, including solvent extraction and development of advanced centrifugal contactors; management of volatile radionuclides; and management of gaseous radioactive wastes. His solvent extraction experience includes an extended assignment with the Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives at Fontenayaux-Roses, near Paris, France, where he helped to develop the DIAMEX process for separation of actinides and lanthanides from high-level liquid wastes. Dr. Jubin is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and received its 2013 Robert E. Wilson Award for outstanding chemical engineering contributions and achievements in the nuclear industry. He also chairs the American Society of Mechanical Engineers’ Gas Processing Subcommittee. He received a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Akron and an M.S. in engineering management and a Ph.D. in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×

chemical engineering, both from the University of Tennessee. He retired from the U.S. Air Force Reserve in 2007 at the rank of colonel.

Emmett B. Keeler, Ph.D. (NAM), is a professor in the Pardee RAND Graduate School and an adjunct professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, Public Health School, where he has taught about cost-effectiveness, cost-benefit, and decision analysis in medicine and public health for many years. He led the multisite Improving Chronic Illness Care Evaluation and the Management of Childbirth Patient Outcomes Research Team. He also analyzed health outcomes and episodes of spending for the RAND Health Insurance Experiment. His recent work has examined the costs of lung cancer screening and policies to promote cost-lowering new technologies. An elected member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), Dr. Keeler has participated in Institute of Medicine committees on the polygraph, on incorporating uncertainty into environmental decisions, the economic costs of uninsurance, the use of health measures in regulatory analysis, national health accounts, and geographic variation in health care spending. Dr. Keeler received a Ph.D. in mathematics from Harvard University.

Gerald L. Kulcinski, Ph.D. (NAE), is the Grainger Professor of Nuclear Engineering, Emeritus, and the director of the Fusion Technology Institute at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He was the associate dean of research for the College of Engineering from 2001 to 2014. His current research involves the assessment of the technological and environmental aspects of the production of electricity from renewable, fossil, and nuclear energy sources. He has published more than 300 peer-reviewed scientific articles, more than 300 additional reports and articles in conference proceedings, and is a coauthor or contributor to four books. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1993 and was awarded the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Public Service Medal in 1993 and the NASA Exceptional Public Service Medal in 2010. Dr. Kulcinski received a B.S. in chemical engineering and a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Jason S. Lewis, Ph.D., is the Emily Tow Jackson Endowed Chair, vice chair of research in radiology, chief attending of the Radiochemistry & Imaging Sciences Service, and director of the Radiochemistry & Molecular Imaging Probe Core at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). He holds a joint appointment in the Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program at the Sloan Kettering Institute and in radiology at the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York. Dr. Lewis received a B.S. and an M.S. in chemistry from the University of Essex and a Ph.D. in biochemistry

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×

from the University of Kent; he did his postdoctoral work at the Washington University School of Medicine (WUSM). Subsequently, he joined the WUSM faculty as an assistant professor of radiology (2003-2008), after which he joined MSKCC. Dr. Lewis’s research program is a molecular imaging-based program focused on radiopharmaceutical development as well as the study of multimodality (PET, CT, and MRI) small- and biomolecule-based agents and their clinical translation. He has published more than 130 peer-reviewed articles as well as numerous book chapters and reviews. His research is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health.

Kathryn A. Morton, M.D., is professor of radiology at the University of Utah with specialty training in diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. She previously served as chief of nuclear medicine at four academic centers (Veterans Affairs medical centers in Portland, Oregon, and Salt Lake City, Utah; Wake Forest University Medical Center; and University of Utah). Dr. Morton has 30 years of clinical experience with PET, PET/CT, conventional nuclear medicine, and diagnostic radiology. She also has academic experience as a researcher in imaging and molecular and cellular biology. She has served on more than 100 National Institutes of Health study sections and is the past chairman of the Grant Programs Committee for the Radiological Society of North America. She received an M.D. from the University of Utah.

Eugene J. Peterson, Ph.D., is executive advisor to Los Alamos National Laboratory’s associate director for chemistry, life, and earth sciences and is leading the laboratory’s strategic planning efforts for the Science of Signatures science pillar. Previously, he was the chemistry division leader at Los Alamos, where he was responsible for 350 chemical professionals and a budget of approximately $150 million. Before his tenure as chemistry division leader, Dr. Peterson specialized in medical isotope production and applications research and development. He was responsible for technical management of the laboratory’s isotope production efforts and associated research and development, business management of isotope distribution and marketing, and procuring adequate funding for these programs. Notable program successes during his tenure included the construction of a new $23.5 million 100 MeV Isotope Production Facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for the production of accelerator isotopes and the lease by the U.S. Department of Energy of the laboratory’s cryogenic distillation columns for the separation and purification of isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to the private sector. Dr. Peterson served on the National Academies Committee on Medical Isotope Production without

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×

Highly Enriched Uranium. He received a B.S. from the Illinois Benedictine College and a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Arizona State University.

Tor Raubenheimer, Ph.D., is a professor at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University. He is an expert in accelerator physics and design, especially for high-energy linear accelerators. Since 2011, Prof. Raubenheimer has been leading the accelerator physics design for the LCLS-II, a new high-power X-ray free electron laser based on a 4 GeV superconducting RF linac. He previously served as division director for the SLAC Accelerator Research Division, where he helped launch the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests as well as Large Hadron Collider accelerator research and muon accelerator research and development efforts at SLAC. Prior, he was head of the International Linear Collider Division and head of accelerator physics for the Next Linear Collider Project. He has authored more than 40 refereed journal articles and 250 conference papers. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and has received its Division of Beam Physics Dissertation Award (1994) as well as the U.S. Particle Accelerator School Prize for Achievement in Accelerator Physics and Technology (2001). Prof. Raubenheimer received a B.S. in physics and computer science from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University.

Henry D. Royal, M.D., is professor of radiology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and associate director of nuclear medicine at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. He is trained in internal medicine and nuclear medicine and has been practicing nuclear medicine for 40 years, working in both academic and hospital settings. Dr. Royal was a member of the American Board of Nuclear Medicine from 1993 to 1999 and served as its executive director from 2004 to 2014. He also served as president of the Society of Nuclear Medicine from 2003 to 2004 and received its Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008. Dr. Royal was a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation from 2002 to 2005; co-team leader of the health effects section of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s International Chernobyl Project; a member of the Presidential Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments; chair of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Scientific Committee on Radiation Effects on the Thyroid; and scientific chair of the Veterans’ Advisory Committee on Environmental Hazards (2001 to 2010). He has been listed in “Best Doctors in America” since 1992. He received an M.D. from St. Louis University.

Felicia L. Taw, Ph.D., is group leader of the Nuclear and Radiochemistry Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This group, which

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×

comprises approximately 100 staff, undertakes research and development and provides operational support for the lab’s stockpile stewardship, threat reduction, and global security missions. Specific capability and program areas include nuclear forensics, treaty monitoring, weapons assessment, nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry, radioanalytical measurements, mass separations and mass spectrometry, and analytical chemistry. Dr. Taw previously served as deputy group leader for the Inorganic, Isotope, and Actinide Chemistry Group, where she helped manage the production of medical isotopes in support of LANL’s isotope program, as well as research and operations in actinide and inorganic chemistry. She also previously served as the Chemistry Division’s project manager for the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Mo-99 Production Program. She has contributed to research on spent nuclear fuel, the development of gamma and neutron detectors, actinide chemistry, and fundamental inorganic and organic chemistry. Dr. Taw was a director’s postdoctoral fellow at LANL and received a Ph.D. in organometallic chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Staff

Kevin D. Crowley, Ph.D., Study Director, is senior board director of the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board (NRSB) at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Washington, DC. He is responsible for planning and managing the NRSB’s portfolio of studies on radiation health effects, radioactive waste management and environmental cleanup, and nuclear security and terrorism and has personally directed or codirected more than 25 Academies studies in these and other subject areas. Dr. Crowley also is the principal investigator of the Academies’ Radiation Effects Research Foundation project, which provides scientific support for the long-term study of health effects arising from exposures to ionizing radiation among World War II atomic-bombing survivors. Dr. Crowley held positions at Miami University of Ohio, the University of Oklahoma, and the U.S. Geological Survey before joining the Academies staff in 1993. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geology from Princeton University.

Ourania (Rania) Kosti, Ph.D., Senior Program Officer, joined the staff of the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board (NRSB) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in January 2011. Prior to her current appointment, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, DC, where she conducted research on biomarker development for early cancer detection using case-control epidemiologic study designs. She focused primarily on prostate, breast, and liver cancers and trying to

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×

identify those individuals who are at high risk of developing malignancies. Dr. Kosti also trained at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) (2005-2007). She received a B.Sc. in biochemistry from the University of Surrey, UK, an M.Sc. in molecular medicine from University College London, and a Ph.D. in molecular endocrinology from St. Bartholomew’s Hospital in London, UK. Dr. Kosti’s interests within the NRSB focus on radiation health effects.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 223
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 224
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 225
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 226
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 227
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 228
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 229
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23563.
×
Page 230
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The decay product of the medical isotope molybdenum-99 (Mo-99), technetium-99m (Tc-99m), and associated medical isotopes iodine-131 (I-131) and xenon-133 (Xe-133) are used worldwide for medical diagnostic imaging or therapy. The United States consumes about half of the world’s supply of Mo-99, but there has been no domestic (i.e., U.S.-based) production of this isotope since the late 1980s. The United States imports Mo-99 for domestic use from Australia, Canada, Europe, and South Africa.

Mo-99 and Tc-99m cannot be stockpiled for use because of their short half-lives. Consequently, they must be routinely produced and delivered to medical imaging centers. Almost all Mo-99 for medical use is produced by irradiating highly enriched uranium (HEU) targets in research reactors, several of which are over 50 years old and are approaching the end of their operating lives. Unanticipated and extended shutdowns of some of these old reactors have resulted in severe Mo-99 supply shortages in the United States and other countries. Some of these shortages have disrupted the delivery of medical care. Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging examines the production and utilization of Mo-99 and associated medical isotopes, and provides recommendations for medical use.

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