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Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop (2016)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters

Joseph Arvai (Planning Committee Chair) is the Max McGraw professor of sustainable enterprise in the School of Natural Resources and Environment and the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. He is also the director of the Frederick A. and Barbara M. Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan, senior researcher at the Decision Science Research Institute in Eugene, Oregon, and adjunct professor at Carnegie Mellon University. His research has two main areas of emphasis: advancing an understanding of how people process information and make decisions and developing and testing decision-aiding tools and approaches across a wide range of environmental, social, and economic contexts. His work also focuses on choices made by people individually and when working in groups. He has an M.Sc. in oceanography and a Ph.D. in decision sciences from the University of British Columbia.

Inês Azevedo is associate professor of engineering and public policy and codirector of the Center for Climate and Energy Decision Making at Carnegie Mellon University. Her research interests lie at the intersection of environmental, technical, and economic issues, such as how to address the challenge of climate change and to move toward a more sustainable energy system. She has been looking at how energy systems are likely to be shaped in the future, which requires comprehensive knowledge of technologies that can address future energy needs and the decision-making process followed by different agents in the economy. She has also been working on assessing how specific policies will

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×

shape future energy systems. She has a Ph.D. in engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University.

Margaret Davidson is the acting director of the Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Before joining NOAA, she was executive director of the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, and she also served as special counsel and assistant attorney general for the Louisiana Department of Justice. She holds a faculty appointment at the University of Charleston and serves on the adjunct faculties of Clemson University and the University of South Carolina. She has focused on environmentally sustainable aquaculture, mitigation of coastal hazards, and impacts of climate variability on coastal resources. She has a J.D. in natural resources law from Louisiana State University and a master’s degree in marine policy and resource economics from the University of Rhode Island.

Kristie Ebi (Planning Committee Member) is a professor in the Department of Global Health and in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the University of Washington, a guest professor at Umea University, Sweden, and consulting professor at Stanford University and George Washington University. Her work focuses on understanding sources of vulnerability and designing adaptation policies and measures to reduce the risks of climate change in a multistressor environment. She is cochair of the International Committee on New Integrated Climate Change Assessment Scenarios and was executive director of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Working Group II Technical Support Unit. She has an M.S. in toxicology and a Ph.D. and an M.P.H. in epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Baruch Fischhoff (Planning Committee Member) is Howard Heinz university professor in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy and the Department of Social and Decision Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and past president of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making and of the Society for Risk Analysis. He chaired the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee and served on many other commissions and committees. He has a B.S. in mathematics and psychology from Wayne State University and a Ph.D. in psychology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Paul Fleming directs the Climate Resiliency Program for Seattle Public Utilities (SPU). He is responsible for leading SPU’s climate research initiatives, assessing climate impacts, building adaptive capacity, establishing collaborative partnerships, and leading SPU’s carbon neutrality initiative. He is past chair of the Water Utility Climate Alliance and past cochair of the U.S. Environmental Protection

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×

Agency’s Climate Ready Water Utility Working Group and currently serves on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Working Group. He also serves as chair of the Project Advisory Board for a European Union-funded research project focused on climate change and the water cycle. He has a B.A. from Duke University and an M.B.A. from the University of Washington.

Gregg Garfin is an associate professor in climate, natural resources, and policy in the University of Arizona’s School of Natural Resources and the Environment and deputy director for science translation and outreach in the university’s Institute of the Environment. He works on bridging the science-society interface. His research focuses on climate variability and change, drought, and adaptation to a changing climate. Geographic interests include semi-arid regions, transboundary regions, and monsoon climates. He has also led a 120-author assessment on climate change and its impacts in the Southwest and was co-convening lead author for the Southwest chapter in the 2014 National Climate Assessment. He has a Ph.D. in geosciences from the University of Arizona.

Peter Gleick (Planning Committee Member) cofounded and leads the Pacific Institute in Oakland, California. His work has redefined water from the realm of engineers to the world of social justice, sustainability, human rights, and integrated thinking. He developed the first analysis of climate change impacts on water resources and the earliest comprehensive work on water and conflict and defined basic human needs for water and the human right to water. He pioneered the concept of the “soft path for water,” developed the idea of “peak water,” and has written about the need for a “local water movement.” He has a B.S. from Yale University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.

Robin Gregory is senior researcher with Decision Research and adjunct professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability. He works on applied problems of stakeholder consultation, environmental and risk management, value elicitation, decision making under uncertainty, community and indigenous health assessment, and negotiated decision making. Using methods drawn from decision analysis, behavioral psychology, applied ecology and negotiation analysis, his research and applied work emphasizes collaborative decision-aiding approaches that help participants to understand their own and others’ responses to the consequences of actions characterized by multiple dimensions, substantial uncertainty, and often controversy. In such cases, tough choices need to be made across different options; the use of structured decision methods can serve as the basis for generating and evaluating better and more broadly accepted alternatives. Robin has written and consulted extensively on the subject of informing public policy choices and is lead author of the book, Structured Decision Making: A Practical

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×

Guide to Environmental Management Choices (Wiley-Blackwell Press, 2012). He has a B.A. in economics from Yale University, an M.A. from the University of British Columbia in natural resources management, and an interdisciplinary Ph.D. from UBC in psychology, ecology, and economics.

Alice Hill serves at the White House as special assistant to the President and senior director for resilience policy for the National Security Council. In this capacity, she has led the development of Presidential Executive Orders regarding incorporation of climate resilience considerations into international development, increased federal coordination in the Arctic, and establishment of national flood risk and earthquake risk management standards. Prior to joining the White House, she served as senior counselor to the secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and ex officio on the advisory committee for the National Climate Assessment. Previously, she served as supervising judge on the Los Angeles Superior Court and as a federal prosecutor.

Andrew J. Hoffman (Planning Committee Member) is the Holcim (U.S.) professor of sustainable enterprise; a position that holds joint appointments at the School of Natural Resources and Environment and the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. He also serves as education director of the Graham Sustainability Institute. His research focuses on corporate strategies that address environmental and social issues. His disciplinary background lies in the areas of organizational behavior, institutional change, negotiations and change management. He has published more than 100 articles and twelve books, two of which have been translated into five different languages. Previously, he worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Metcalf & Eddy, the Amoco Corporation, and T&T Construction and Design, Inc. In 2004, he was a senior fellow with the Meridian Institute. He holds a Ph.D. in management and civil and environmental engineering (joint degree) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

John P. Holdren is assistant to the President for science and technology, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and cochair of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Prior to joining the Obama administration, he was Teresa and John Heinz professor of environmental policy and director of the Program on Science, Technology, and Public Policy at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, professor in Harvard’s Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, and director of the Woods Hole Research Center. Previously, he was on the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, where he cofounded and co-led the interdisciplinary graduate-degree program in energy and resources. He holds advanced degrees in aerospace engineering and theoretical plasma physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×

Thomas Karl currently serves as director of the National Climatic Data Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Asheville, North Carolina, and chair of the U.S. Global Change Research Program. He is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society and the American Geophysical Union. He has been the convening and lead author and review editor of all the major Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessments since 1990. He was cochair of two U.S. National Climate Assessments. He has a B.S. in meteorology from Northern Illinois University, an M.S in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin, and a doctorate of humane letters (honoris causa) from North Carolina State University.

Robert Kopp serves at Rutgers University as an associate professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and as associate director of the Rutgers Energy Institute. He is also a member of the Rutgers Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences and the Rutgers Climate Institute. His research focuses on understanding uncertainty in past and future climate change, with major emphases on sea-level change and on the interactions between physical climate change and the economy. Prior to joining the Rutgers faculty, he served as an American Association for the Advancement of Science science and technology policy fellow in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Policy and International Affairs and as a science, technology and environmental policy postdoctoral research fellow at Princeton University. He received his undergraduate degree in geophysical sciences from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. in geobiology from the California Institute of Technology.

Michael Kuperberg is executive director for the U.S. Global Change Research Program. He is on detail from the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), where he has managed environmental research programs for the past decade. Prior to his position with DOE, he was on the research faculty of Florida State University as associate director for environmental programs within the Center for Biomedical and Toxicological Research and a biological scientist for the Center for Aquatic Research and Resource Management. He led the U.S. government reviews of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment report from Working Group I and has been a member of the U.S. review team for all of the other IPCC Working Group products. He has an M.S. in biology from Florida State University and a Ph.D. in environmental toxicology from Florida A&M University.

Jeremy Martinich is a scientist with the Climate Change Division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). He leads EPA’s Climate Change Impacts and Risk Analysis project, a coordinated analysis to estimate the physical and economic risks of inaction on climate change and the multisector benefits to the United States of climate action. Previously, he led the development

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×

of EPA’s first climate adaptation program, Climate Ready Estuaries, and helped write and defend the 2009 Endangerment Finding for greenhouse gases under Section 202(a) of the Clean Air Act. He has a B.A. in environmental science and policy from Kenyon College and an M.Sc. from American University.

Susanne Moser is director and principal researcher of Susanne Moser Research & Consulting in Santa Cruz, California. She is also a social science research fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University and a research associate at the Institute for Marine Sciences at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Her work focuses on adaptation to climate change, vulnerability, resilience, climate change communication, social change, decision support and the interaction between scientists, policy makers, and the public. She contributed to Working Group II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) Fourth and Fifth Assessment Reports and served as review editor on the IPCC’s Special Report on “Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation.” She has a Ph.D. in geography from Clark University.

Richard H. Moss (Planning Committee Member) is senior research scientist with the Joint Global Change Research Institute at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory/University of Maryland, visiting senior research scientist at the Earth Systems Science Interdisciplinary Center, and senior fellow with the World Wildlife Fund. Previously, he served as director of the Office of the U.S. Global Change Research Program/Climate Change Science Program and directed the Technical Support Unit of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) impacts, adaptation, and mitigation working group. He led preparation of the U.S. government’s 10-year climate change research plan and has been a lead author and editor of a number of IPCC publications. His research interests include development and use of scenarios, characterization and communication of uncertainty, and quantitative indicators of adaptive capacity and vulnerability to climate change. He has a B.A. from Carleton College and an M.P.A. and a Ph.D. in public and international affairs from Princeton University.

Jonathan Overpeck is a founding codirector of the Institute of the Environment, as well as a professor of geosciences and a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Arizona. He served as a coordinating lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment. Before coming to the University of Arizona, he was the founding director of the NOAA Paleoclimatology Program and the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology, both in Boulder, Colorado. While in Boulder, he was also a fellow at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research at the University of Colorado. He has a B.A. from Hamilton College and an M.Sc. and a Ph.D. from Brown University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×

Benjamin Sanderson is a project scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. His research interests include scenario development, uncertainty quantification for projections of future climate change, climatic feedback processes, perturbed physics, and machine learning applications for climate science. He has a doctorate in atmospheric science from Oxford University.

Claudia Tebaldi (Planning Committee Member) is a science fellow in climate statistics at Climate Central. She is also a climate statistician at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Her research interests include the analysis of observations and climate model output in order to characterize observed and projected climatic changes and their uncertainties. She has published papers on detection and attribution of these changes, on extreme value analysis, future projections at regional levels, and impacts of climate change on agriculture and human health. She is a lead author of the Fifth Assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Working Group I. She has a Ph.D. in statistics from Duke University.

Bradley Udall serves as senior water and climate research scientist at the Colorado Water Institute to provide expertise in the field of water resources and climate change. He has extensive experience in water and climate policy issues, most recently as the director of the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment and the Western Water Assessment at the Colorado State University. He has researched water problems on all major Southwestern U.S. rivers and has spent 6 months in Australia studying the country’s recent water reforms.

Chris Weaver (Planning Committee Member) is a climate scientist in Office of Research and Development of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Previously, he held positions in the U.S. federal climate research and policy enterprise, including as deputy director and acting director of the U.S. Global Change Research Program and as senior advisor in the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the White House. Before that, he was on the faculty of the Department of Environmental Sciences at Rutgers University. His research has focused on the role of clouds in the climate system, land-atmosphere interactions, and the water cycle; the intersection of climate change with air quality, water quality, human health, and ecosystems; planning and decision making under uncertainty about the future trajectory of climate change; and the key role of the social sciences in moving climate science into action. He has an undergraduate degree from Princeton University and a Ph.D. from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×

Robyn S. Wilson (Planning Committee Member) is an associate professor in the School of Environment and Natural Resources at Ohio State University. She is a behavioral decision scientist, focusing primarily on the individual decision-making process under risk and uncertainty. She is also interested in the development of strategic communication efforts aimed at correcting for deficiencies in information processing, as well as the use of decision support tools that assist individuals in making more informed and value-consistent choices. She is the behavioral sciences faculty leader for the Sustainable and Resilient Economy Program at Ohio State where she focuses on integrating behavioral mechanisms into integrated assessments of the sustainability of policies and technologies. She has a B.A. in environmental studies from Denison University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in natural resource management from Ohio State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×
Page 82
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×
Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×
Page 84
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×
Page 86
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23569.
×
Page 88
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The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) was established in 1990 to “assist the Nation and the world to understand, assess, predict, and respond to human-induced and natural processes of global change.”1 A key responsibility for the program is to conduct National Climate Assessments (NCAs) every 4 years.2 These assessments are intended to inform the nation about “observed changes in climate, the current status of the climate, and anticipated trends for the future.” The USGCRP hopes that government entities from federal agencies to small municipalities, citizens, communities, and businesses will rely on these assessments of climate- related risks for planning and decision-making. The third NCA (NCA3) was published in 2014 and work on the fourth is beginning.

The USGCRP asked the Board on Environmental Change and Society of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to conduct a workshop to explore ways to frame the NCA4 and subsequent NCA reports in terms of risks to society. The workshop was intended to collect experienced views on how to characterize and communicate information about climate-related hazards, risks, and opportunities that will support decision makers in their efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce vulnerability to likely changes in climate, and increase resilience to those changes. Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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