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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
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APPENDIX A

Committee Biographies

Dr. Robert A. Duce (Co-Chair)

Texas A&M University, College Station

Dr. Robert A. Duce is University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences and retired Dean of the College of Geosciences at Texas A&M University. He was also Dean of the Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island. His research focuses on atmospheric and marine chemistry, including the global cycling of trace elements, and he was awarded the Rosenstiel Award in 1990. He was recently chair of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Ocean Studies Board, served on the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and chaired or co-chaired several National Research Council committees. Dr. Duce is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, American Meteorological Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, and the Oceanography Society. He is past president of the Oceanography Society, the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences, the International Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Pollution, and the International Council for Science Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research. He is also past chair and current member of the United Nations Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection, and he served on the National Sea Grant Advisory Board. He earned his Ph.D. in Inorganic and Nuclear Chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1964.

Dr. Barbara J. Finlayson-Pitts (Co-Chair)

University of California, Irvine

Dr. Barbara J. Finlayson-Pitts is a professor of Chemistry and Distinguished Professor at the University of California, Irvine, where she co-directs AirUCI, a collaboration of about two dozen faculty working on different facets of atmospheric chemistry and its impacts. She is a fellow of American Geophysical Union, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Royal Society of Chemistry, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences as well as the National Academy of Sciences. Awards include the American Chemical Society Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology, the Tolman Medal of the Southern California ACS and the Haagen-Smit Clean Air Award from the California Air Resources Board. Her research is centered on obtaining a molecular level understanding of reactions that are known, or have the potential, to occur in the atmosphere. Her research includes

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×

reactions of airborne sea salt particles and reactions of oxides of nitrogen and organics in thin films on surfaces. Current areas of focus include the atmospheric chemistry of neonicotinoid pesticides, and mechanisms of formation and growth of particles in air and the implications for air quality and climate in the future. She obtained her Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California, Riverside, in 1973.

Dr. Tami Bond

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Dr. Tami Bond is the Nathan M. Newmark Distinguished Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in Civil and Environmental Engineering, and an affiliate professor in Atmospheric Sciences. Dr. Bond’s research addresses the aerosol chemistry, physics, and optics that govern the environmental impacts of particles from combustion. Her work includes laboratory studies of aerosol behavior, field measurements of emissions from small combustion sources, development of global emission inventories, and future emission projections. Dr. Bond is a Fellow of American Geophysical Union and a member of the American Association for Aerosol Research and has authored or co-authored more than 60 scientific papers. She earned her Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences, Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Washington. Dr. Bond is a 2014 John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellow.

Dr. William H. Brune

Pennsylvania State University

Dr. William H. Brune is a Distinguished Professor of Meteorology at Pennsylvania State University. His research interests include atmospheric photochemistry from Earth’s surface to the stratosphere; atmospheric aerosol particle formation and aging; uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for atmospheric chemistry models and measurements; and new measurement strategies for atmospheric oxidation processes. He received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University.

Dr. Annmarie Carlton

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Dr. Annmarie Carlton is an associate professor at Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey. Her research interests include atmospheric modeling for air quality and climate with emphasis on atmospheric aqueous chemistry; formation of secondary organic aerosol through cloud processing; aerosol–cloud interactions; biogenic and anthropogenic influences on climate and air quality; and atmospheric processing of pollution. Dr. Carlton received the 2015–2016 Board of Trustees Award for Excellence in Research and the 2009 Distinguished Alumnus for early career distinction from Rutgers. Dr. Carlton worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in New

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×

York, NY, and Research Triangle Park, NC. She received her Ph.D. from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

Dr. Allen H. Goldstein

University of California, Berkeley

Dr. Allen H. Goldstein is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at the University of California, Berkeley, where he served as department chair from 2007–2010. He is currently co-chair of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Program (IGAC). His research program encompasses anthropogenic air pollution, biosphere–atmosphere exchange of radiatively and chemically active trace gases, and development and application of novel instrumentation to investigate the organic chemistry of Earth’s atmosphere. He engages in field measurement campaigns, controlled laboratory experiments, and modeling activities covering indoor, urban, rural, regional, intercontinental, and global scale studies of ozone, aerosols, and their gas phase precursors. Dr. Goldstein was elected a fellow of the American Geophysical Union, selected as a Miller Foundation Researcher Professor, and a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Australia. He has published more than 280 peer-reviewed scientific papers and holds a patent for On-Line Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Airborne Particles. He earned his B.A. and B.S. degrees from the University of California, Santa Cruz, in Politics and Chemistry, and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Harvard University in 1994.

Dr. Colette Heald

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Dr. Colette L. Heald is an associate professor in the Departments of Civil and Environment Engineering & Earth and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her primary research interests are exploring biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes relevant to atmospheric chemistry and the lifecycle and impacts of atmospheric aerosols. Her research focuses on integrating global modeling tools with observations. Dr. Heald has authored or co-authored more than 70 peer-reviewed scientific articles. She is a recipient of the Macelwane Medal and is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union. She received her undergraduate degree in Engineering Physics from Queen’s University in Canada in 2000 and her Ph.D. in Earth and Planetary Science from Harvard University in 2005.

Dr. Scott C. Herndon

Aerodyne Research, Inc.

Dr. Scott C. Herndon is a Physical Chemist and Principal Scientist in the Center for Atmospheric and Environmental Chemistry at Aerodyne Research, Inc. Since joining Aerodyne in 1999, his research interests have focused on the development and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×

utilization of laboratory and field trace gas and fine particle instrumentation, together with modeling studies, to characterize and elucidate atmospheric processes relevant to stratospheric ozone depletion, urban and regional air quality and climate change. He has led more than 20 field measurement campaigns to characterize and quantify air pollutant emission sources and map ambient pollution concentrations using suites of advanced, real-time spectroscopic, and mass spectrometric instrumentation deployed on the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory and on a range of research aircraft and ships. Most recently Dr. Herndon has developed an improved dual tracer release ratio method to quantify methane emissions from oil and gas production and transmission facilities and other sources in the United States and Mexico. He is the author or co-author of more than 50 archival publications addressing atmospheric science and physical chemistry issues. He earned his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry at the University of Colorado.

Dr. Dylan B. Jones

University of Toronto

Dr. Dylan Jones is a professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto. His research is focused on integrating measurements of atmospheric composition with global three-dimensional models of chemistry and transport to develop a better understanding of how pollution influences the chemical and dynamical state of the atmosphere. His research also uses chemical data assimilation and inverse modeling techniques to quantify surface fluxes of trace constituents that are important for air quality and the global carbon cycle. Dr. Jones is a member of the GEOS (Goddard Earth Observing System)–Chem Model Steering Committee. He held a Tier II Canada Research Chair from 2004-2014 and received an Ontario Early Researcher Award in 2007. He received his B.A. in Physics and Astronomy and Astrophysics from Harvard University in 1990, his M.Sc. in Applied Physics from Harvard University in 1994, and his Ph.D. in Earth and Planetary Sciences from Harvard University in 1998.

Dr. Athanasios Nenes

Georgia Institute of Technology

Dr. Athanasios Nenes is a professor, Georgia Power Scholar, Cullen-Peck Fellow, and Johnson Faculty Fellow at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is also an affiliate scientist at the Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, and the National Observatory of Athens, Greece. Through a combination of theory, modeling, and observations, his research focuses on aerosol thermodynamics, aerosol–cloud interactions and their impacts on the hydrological cycle and climate; biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, and aerosol impacts on marine productivity and the carbon cycle. He is an author on more than 210 peer-reviewed manuscripts, and is developer of the ISORROPIA aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium codes and is co-inventor of the Continuous

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×

Flow Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN (Cloud Condensation Nuclei) chamber. He served as Secretary of the Atmospheric Science Section of the American Geophysical Union, the Board of Directors of the American Association for Aerosol Research, and on the Committee on Nucleation and Atmospheric Aerosols. He is recipient of the Atmospheric Sciences Section Ascent Award, American Geophysical Union, Kenneth T. Whitby and Sheldon K Friedlander Awards from the American Association for Aerosol Research, and the Henry G. Houghton Award from the American Meteorological Society. He received his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology.

Dr. Kimberly A. Prather

University of California, San Diego

Dr. Kimberly Prather is the Distinguished Chair in Atmospheric Chemistry and holds a joint appointment in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at University of California, San Diego, since 2001. Early in her career, she developed novel on-line single particle mass spectrometers that are used worldwide to determine the sources of aerosols in air pollution. Her group uses these instruments to better understand the sources of air pollution and understand the role of aerosols in climate change, including aircraft-based measurements of aerosol impacts on cloud properties and precipitation. She has published more than 180 peer-reviewed scientific papers and holds a number of patents on online mass spectrometry methods. She served two terms on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Atmospheric Science and Climate. She is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Science, American Geophysical Union, and Association for the Advancement of Arts and Sciences. She received her Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from University of California, Davis, in 1990.

Dr. Michael J. Prather

University of California, Irvine

Dr. Michael J. Prather is professor of Earth System Science at the University of California, Irvine. His research focuses on: the simulation of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that determine atmospheric composition; the development of detailed numerical models of photochemistry and atmospheric radiation; and overall testing of global chemical transport models that describe ozone and other trace gases. Post-Ph.D., Dr. Prather was a research fellow at Harvard University and then a scientist at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, including also managing National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters programs on upper atmosphere and aviation impacts. A fellow of the American Geophysical Union, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, he served from 1997 through 2001 as editor-in-chief of Geophysi-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×

cal Research Letters. He received a B.A. in Mathematics from Yale University, a B.A. in Physics from the University of Oxford, and a Ph.D. in Astronomy and Astrophysics from Yale University. Dr. Prather has participated in key United Nations environmental efforts, including international ozone assessments (1985, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1994, 2010, 2014) and climate assessments Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: 1992, 1995, 1999, 2001, 2007, 2013, 2014). Dr. Prather has served on numerous National Research Council committees, most recently as a member of the Assessment of NASA’s Earth Science Programs. He also previously served on the Committee on Methods for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions, the Panel on Climate Variability and Change of the 2007 decadal survey on Earth science and applications from space, and the Committee for Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan.

Dr. Allison Steiner

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Dr. Allison Steiner is an associate professor at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Her research interests focus on understanding biosphere–atmosphere interactions across a range of spatial and temporal scales, including improved understanding of primary emissions and their fate in the atmosphere and changes in atmospheric chemistry on climatological time scales. She is the recipient of the University of Michigan Henry Russel Award in 2013 and the American Geophysical Union Atmospheric Sciences section Ascent Award in 2015. She received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and her Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from Georgia Institute of Technology.

Dr. Christine Wiedinmyer

National Center for Atmospheric Research

Dr. Christine Wiedinmyer is a Scientist III in the Atmospheric Chemistry Observations & Modeling Laboratory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Dr. Wiedinmyer’s research emphasizes the identification and quantification of various emission sources and determining the transport and fate of pollutants in the atmosphere using models and observations. Her research interests include evaluating ways in which climate, technology, and policy impact air quality. Dr. Wiedinmyer was the 2014 Walter Orr Roberts Lecturer in Interdisciplinary Sciences from the American Meteorological Society. She received her B.S.E. in Chemical Engineering from Tulane University and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from The University of Texas at Austin.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×

Dr. Lei Zhu

New York State Department of Health

Dr. Lei Zhu is a research scientist at the Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, and a professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the University at Albany, State University of New York. Dr. Zhu’s research program has been designed to investigate and reveal what controls the atmosphere’s energy balance and how chemical reactions impact composition, pollutant and oxidant formation in Earth’s environment. Her research interests include kinetics and photochemistry of homogeneous and heterogeneous atmospheric reactions, atmospheric application of cavity ring-down spectroscopy and its novel variants, and atmospheric application of time-resolved FT-IR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy). Dr. Zhu received her Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Columbia University in 1991. She was an Enrico Fermi Scholar at Argonne National Laboratory from 1991 to 1993.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23573.
×
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Our world is changing at an accelerating rate. The global human population has grown from 6.1 billion to 7.1 billion in the last 15 years and is projected to reach 11.2 billion by the end of the century. The distribution of humans across the globe has also shifted, with more than 50 percent of the global population now living in urban areas, compared to 29 percent in 1950. Along with these trends, increasing energy demands, expanding industrial activities, and intensification of agricultural activities worldwide have in turn led to changes in emissions that have altered the composition of the atmosphere.

These changes have led to major challenges for society, including deleterious impacts on climate, human and ecosystem health. Climate change is one of the greatest environmental challenges facing society today. Air pollution is a major threat to human health, as one out of eight deaths globally is caused by air pollution. And, future food production and global food security are vulnerable to both global change and air pollution. Atmospheric chemistry research is a key part of understanding and responding to these challenges.

The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research: Remembering Yesterday, Understanding Today, Anticipating Tomorrow summarizes the rationale and need for supporting a comprehensive U.S. research program in atmospheric chemistry; comments on the broad trends in laboratory, field, satellite, and modeling studies of atmospheric chemistry; determines the priority areas of research for advancing the basic science of atmospheric chemistry; and identifies the highest priority needs for improvements in the research infrastructure to address those priority research topics. This report describes the scientific advances over the past decade in six core areas of atmospheric chemistry: emissions, chemical transformation, oxidants, atmospheric dynamics and circulation, aerosol particles and clouds, and biogeochemical cycles and deposition. This material was developed for the NSF’s Atmospheric Chemistry Program; however, the findings will be of interest to other agencies and programs that support atmospheric chemistry research.

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