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National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report (2016)

Chapter: Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
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A

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

JAMES O. ELLIS, JR., Co-Chair, currently serves as an Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He retired as president and chief executive officer of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO), in Atlanta, Georgia, in 2012. In 2004, Admiral Ellis completed a distinguished 39-year Navy career as commander of the United States Strategic Command during a time of challenge and change. In this role, he was responsible for the global command and control of U.S. strategic and space forces, reporting directly to the Secretary of Defense. A 1969 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, Admiral Ellis was designated a Naval aviator in 1971. His service as a Navy fighter pilot included tours with two fighter squadrons and assignment as commanding officer of an F/A-18 strike/fighter squadron. In 1991, he assumed command of the USS Abraham Lincoln, a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. After selection to rear admiral, in 1996 he served as a carrier battle group commander leading contingency response operations in the Taiwan Straits. His shore assignments included senior military staff tours directing operations for the U.S. Atlantic Fleet and as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Plans, Policy, and Operations). He also served as commander in chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Europe, and commander in chief, Allied Forces, Southern Europe, during a time of historic NATO expansion and led United States and NATO forces in combat and humanitarian operations during the 1999 Kosovo crisis. Mr. Ellis holds an M.S. in aerospace engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and, in 2005, was inducted into the school’s Engineering Hall of Fame. He also has an M.S. in aeronautical systems from the University of West Florida. He completed U.S. Navy nuclear power training and was qualified in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×

the operation and maintenance of naval nuclear propulsion plants. He is a graduate of the Navy Test Pilot School, the Navy Fighter Weapons School (Top Gun), and the Senior Officer Program in National Security Strategy at Harvard University. In 2013, Mr. Ellis was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. His personal awards include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal (three awards), Navy Distinguished Service Medal (two awards), Legion of Merit (four awards), Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (two awards), and the Navy Commendation Medal, as well as numerous campaign and service awards. He was presented the Order of Merit of the Republic of Hungary, the Star of Merit and Honor from the Greek Ministry of Defense, the Joint Forces Medal of Honor, and the Grand Order of Merit of the Italian Republic. Mr. Ellis currently serves on the board of directors of the Lockheed Martin Corporation, Dominion Resources, and Level 3 Communications, where he is the non-executive chairman of the board. In 2009, he completed 3 years of service as a Presidential appointee on the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board, and in 2006 he was a member of the Military Advisory Panel to the Iraq Study Group.

MARTIN C. FAGA, Co-Chair, is a retired president and chief executive officer of the MITRE Corporation. He was a member of the MITRE Board of Trustees until 2012. Before joining MITRE, Mr. Faga served from 1989 until 1993 as Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Space, where he was responsible for overall supervision of Air Force space matters. At the same time, he served as director of the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), responsible to the Secretary of Defense and the Director of Central Intelligence for the development, acquisition, and operation of all U.S. satellite reconnaissance programs. Mr. Faga is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration and is a member of the board of directors of the Association of Former Intelligence Officers. He served from 2006 until 2009 on the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board and was a member of the Public Interest Declassification Board from 2006 to 2014. Since retiring from MITRE, Mr. Faga has been elected to the boards of directors of Orbital ATK, DigitalGlobe, and Inmarsat Government. He is chairman of the board of Thomson Reuters Special Services. He has also served on the board of Electronic Data Systems. Mr. Faga received M.S. and B.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Lehigh University in 1964 and 1963.

ALLISON ASTORINO-COURTOIS is executive vice president at National Security Innovations (NSI), Inc. She has served as technical lead on a number of multilayer analysis projects sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense in support of U.S. forces and combatant commands. Prior to joining NSI, Dr. Astorino-Courtois worked for Science Applications International Corporation (2004-2007), where she served as a U.S. Strategic Command liaison to U.S. and international communities, and was a tenured associate professor of international relations at Texas

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
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A&M University (1994-2003), where her research focused on the cognitive aspects of foreign policy decision making. She has received a number of academic grants and awards and has published articles in multiple peer-reviewed journals including International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Political Psychology, Journal of Politics, and Conflict Management and Peace Science. She has also taught at Creighton University and as a visiting instructor at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Dr. Astorino-Courtois earned her Ph.D. in international relations from New York University. She served as a co-chair of the Committee on U.S. Air Force Strategic Deterrence Military Capabilities in the 21st Century Security Environment of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

OWEN C. BROWN is a solutions architect with SAIC, following his role as chief technology officer of Kinsay Technical Services, Inc. (KTSi). In that role he acted as the lead executive responsible for management, development, and integration of the company’s intellectual offering, enabling and enhancing customer technical objectives. He provides direct support to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the U.S. Air Force on a variety of complex space system programs. His efforts include assessments of ongoing programs directly to the commander of Air Force Space Command. From 2003 to 2009 Dr. Brown was a program manager in DARPA’s Tactical Technology Office, where he managed multiple small spacecraft programs. He led the MiTEx space program from design to highly successful on-orbit demonstration and was later recognized as one of DARPA’s top program managers for this effort. While at DARPA Dr. Brown created the fractionated spacecraft architectural concept and led the initial stages of the associated System F6 program. He worked for several years as a spacecraft engineer at Space Systems/Loral supporting the design, test, build, and launch of multiple geosynchronous spacecraft for customers including Intelsat, NTT DoCoMo, NASA/ NOAA, DishTV, and the International Space Station. Dr. Brown served as a nuclear submarine officer onboard fast attack submarines and retired after completing 20 combined years of active duty and reserve service. He holds an M.S. and a Ph.D. in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from Stanford University.

VINCENT W.S. CHAN is the Joan and Irwin Jacobs Chair Professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). From 1974 to 1977, he was an assistant professor of electrical engineering at Cornell University. He joined MIT Lincoln Laboratory in 1977 and has been division head of the Communications and Information Technology Division until becoming the director of the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (1999-2007) at MIT. He founded and is currently a member of the Claude E. Shannon Communication and Network Group at MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronics. In July 1983, he initiated the Laser Intersatellite Transmission Experi-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×

ment Program and in 1997, the follow-on GeoLITE Program. In 1989, he led the All-Optical-Network Consortium (1990-1997) formed among MIT, AT&T, and the Digital Equipment Corporation. He also served as principal investigator of the Next Generation Internet Consortium, ONRAMP (1998-2003), formed by AT&T, Cabletron, MIT, Nortel, and JDS; and the Satellite Networking Research Consortium funded by the National Science Foundation and formed between MIT, Motorola, Teledesic, and Globalstar. In 2009, he founded and served as the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Optical Communications and Networking until 2012. He has served many government advisory boards and is currently a member of the Corporation of Draper Laboratory and was on the board of governors of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Communication Society as vice president of publications. He is currently serving on the National Security Agency Advisory Board’s research and technology panels and was on the most recent Intelligence Science Board of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. He is an elected member of Eta Kappa Nu, Tau Beta Pi, and Sigma Xi, and a fellow of IEEE and of the Optical Society of America. Throughout his career, Dr. Chan has focused his research on communication and networks, particularly on free space and fiber-optical communication and networks and satellite communications. His work has led the way to the first successful ultra-high-rate laser communication demonstration in space and early deployment of WDM optical networks. His recent research emphasis is on heterogeneous (SATCOM, wireless, and fiber) network architectures with stringent performance demands. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from MIT.

MICHAEL D. GRIFFIN is the chairman and chief executive officer of Schafer Corporation, a leading provider of scientific, engineering, and technical services and products in the national security sector. He was previously King-McDonald Eminent Scholar and Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Alabama, Huntsville, was the Administrator of NASA from 2005 to 2009, and prior to that was the Space Department head at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. He has also held numerous executive positions with industry, including president and chief operating officer of In-Q-Tel, chief executive officer of Magellan Systems, general manager of Orbital Science Corporation’s Space Systems Group, and executive vice president and chief technical officer at Orbital. Dr. Griffin’s earlier career included service as both chief engineer and associate administrator for exploration at NASA, and as the deputy for technology at the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO). Prior to joining SDIO in an executive capacity, he played a key role in conceiving and directing several first-of-a-kind space tests in support of strategic defense research, development, and flight testing. These included the first space-to-space intercept of a ballistic missile in powered flight, the first broad-spectrum spaceborne reconnaissance of targets

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×

and decoys in midcourse flight, and the first space-to-ground reconnaissance of ballistic missiles during the boost phase. He also played a leading role in other space missions in earlier work at the JHU Applied Physics Laboratory, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the Computer Science Corporation. Dr. Griffin was an adjunct professor for 13 years at the University of Maryland, Johns Hopkins University, and George Washington University, teaching courses in spacecraft design, applied mathematics, guidance and navigation, compressible flow, computational fluid dynamics, spacecraft attitude control, astrodynamics, and introductory aerospace engineering. He is a registered professional engineer in Maryland and California and is the lead author of over two dozen technical papers and the textbook Space Vehicle Design. Dr. Griffin is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the International Academy of Astronautics, an honorary fellow and the current president of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), a fellow of the American Astronautical Society, and a senior member of IEEE. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal, the AIAA Space Systems Medal and Goddard Astronautics Award, the National Space Club’s Goddard Trophy, the Rotary National Award for Space Achievement, the Missile Defense Agency’s Ronald Reagan Award, and the Department of Defense (DoD) Distinguished Public Service Medal, the highest award that can be conferred on a nongovernment employee. He received his Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Maryland and has been recognized with honorary doctoral degrees from Florida Southern College and the University of Notre Dame.

RAYMOND JEANLOZ is professor in Earth and planetary science and in astronomy, and is senior fellow in the Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science at the University of California, Berkeley. His specialties include the constitution and evolution of planetary interiors and properties of materials at high pressures and temperatures. After completing his Ph.D. at the California Institute of Technology, he was on the faculty of Harvard University and then moved to UC Berkeley. Dr. Jeanloz has served as an advisor to academia, industry, and government, including as chair of the Academies’ Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (2000 to 2002) and of the NAS Committee on International Security and Arms Control (since 2005). Dr. Jeanloz is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a member of the Science and Technology Committee advising the LLCs that manage Los Alamos and Livermore laboratories. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Physical Society.

DAVID A. KOPLOW is a professor of law at Georgetown University. He specializes in the areas of public international law and national security law. Professor Koplow

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
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joined the Georgetown law faculty in 1981. His principal courses have been International Law I (the introductory survey of public international law topics), a seminar in the area of arms control, nonproliferation and terrorism, and the proseminar for LLM students in national security law. In addition, he has directed a clinic, the Center for Applied Legal Studies, in which students provide pro bono representation to refugees who seek asylum in the United States because of persecution in their homelands. His government service has included stints as special counsel for arms control to the general counsel of DoD (2009-2011); as deputy general counsel for international affairs at DoD (1997-1999); and as attorney-advisor and special assistant to the director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (1978-1981). He is a graduate of Harvard College and Yale Law School and was a Rhodes Scholar. Most of his scholarly writing concentrates on the intersection of international law and U.S. constitutional law, especially in the areas of arms control and national security and treaty negotiation and implementation. He received a J.D. from Yale University.

L. ROGER MASON, JR., is senior vice president, national security and intelligence, and chief security officer at Noblis. Dr. Mason serves as senior vice president and corporate officer responsible for the overall direction of Noblis’ national security missions, including intelligence, defense, homeland security, and law enforcement. He returns to Noblis after 5 years of service in the Intelligence Community (IC) as the first assistant director of national intelligence for Systems and Resource Analyses (ADNI/SRA). In this capacity, Dr. Mason served as the DNI’s principal intelligence officer and trusted advisor on all matters dealing with intelligence capabilities, resources, requirements, systems analysis, program evaluation, and cost analysis. He led the establishment of this new capability that combined operations research, decision sciences, and business analytics to aid the DNI and senior intelligence agency leaders make difficult decisions on complex issues that spanned every aspect of intelligence from overhead space technologies to counterterrorism. In recognition of his service, Dr. Mason was awarded the National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal—the IC’s highest award. In addition, he led SRA to four National Intelligence Meritorious Unit commendations and received numerous intelligence agency awards. Prior to federal service, Dr. Mason served in a number of senior executive positions in the national security sector, including vice president at Noblis, director at the Institute for Defense Analyses, and general manager of the Advanced Systems Group at General Dynamics (formerly Veridian). Earlier in his career, he led a number of advanced programs combining technology development, system integration, and field operations for military and intelligence missions. He is a nationally recognized expert in intelligence capabilities, operations research, overhead reconnaissance, systems integration, and change leadership. He has published more than 35 papers in peer-reviewed journals and symposia and holds two

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×

U.S. patents dealing with advanced materials and collection devices. Dr. Mason earned his Ph.D. and M.S. in engineering physics (nuclear) from the University of Virginia, a master’s degree in business administration from the Northwestern University’s Kellogg School, and a B.S. in physics from George Washington University. Additionally, he has been recognized with many professional awards, including the Omicron Delta Kappa Leadership Honor Society, Alpha Nu Sigma Honor Society for nuclear science, and the University of Virginia Distinguished Student Award. Dr. Mason is an active leader in the Boy Scouts of America and has been a part of this organization for over 37 years, including attaining the rank of Gold Palm Eagle Scout.

JOHN A. MONTGOMERY is the director of research at the Naval Research Laboratory, where he oversees research and development programs with expenditures of approximately $1.2 billion per year. He joined the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in 1968 as a research physicist in the Advanced Techniques Branch of the Electronic Warfare Division, where he conducted research on a wide range of electronic warfare (EW) topics. In 1980, he was selected to head the Off-Board Countermeasures Branch. In May 1985, he was appointed to the Senior Executive Service (SES) and was selected as superintendent of the Tactical EW Division. He has been responsible for numerous systems that have been developed/approved for operational use by the Navy and other services. He has had great impact through the application of advanced technologies to solve unusual or severe operational deficiencies noted during world crises, most recently in Afghanistan and Iraq and for Homeland Defense and in the Pacific theater. Dr. Montgomery received the Department of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service Award in 2001. He was recognized by the Department of the Navy Distinguished Civilian Service Award in 1999 and by the Department of the Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award in 1986. As a member of the SES, he received the Presidential Rank Award of Distinguished Executive in 1991 and again in 2002, and the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive in 1988, 1999, and again in 2007. He also received the 1997 Dr. Arthur E. Bisson Prize for Naval Technology Achievement, awarded by the Chief of Naval Research in 1998. Further, he received the Association of Old Crows (Electronic Defense Association) Joint Services Award in 1993. He was an NRL Edison Scholar and is a member of Sigma Xi. He served as the U.S. National Leader of the Technical Cooperation Program’s multinational group on EW from 1987 to 2002, and served as its executive chairman. In 2006, Dr. Montgomery received the Laboratory Director of the Year Award from the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer, and in 2011, he received the Roger W. Jones Award for Executive Leadership from American University’s School of Public Affairs. Dr. Montgomery received his Ph.D. in physics from the Catholic University of America. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×

SCOTT PACE is the director of the Space Policy Institute and professor of the practice of international affairs at the George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs. His research interests include civil, commercial, and national security space policy, and the management of technical innovation. From 2005 to 2008, he served as the associate administrator for program analysis and evaluation at NASA. In this capacity, he was responsible for providing objective studies and analyses in support of policy, program, and budget decisions by the NASA Administrator. He previously served as chief technologist for space communications in NASA’s Office of Space Operations, where he was responsible for issues related to space-based information systems. He participated in negotiations that resulted in the 2004 GPS-Galileo Agreement between the United States and the European Commission. Dr. Pace also previously served as the deputy chief of staff to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe. His primary areas of responsibility included oversight of the President’s management agenda in human capital, competitive sourcing, expanding e-government, financial management, and integrating budget and performance. Prior to NASA, Dr. Pace was the assistant director for space and aeronautics in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). There he was responsible for space and aviation-related issues and coordination of civil and commercial space issues through the Space Policy Coordinating Committee of the National Security Council. From 1993 to 2000, Dr. Pace worked for the RAND Corporation’s Science and Technology Policy Institute—a federally funded research and development center for OSTP. Dr. Pace was a key member of a successful international effort to preserve radio navigation satellite spectrum at the 1997 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-97) and the addition of new spectrum for satellite navigation at WRC-2000. He also was a member of the DoD Senior Review Group on Commercial Remote Sensing and the Academies’ Committee on Earth Sciences. From 1990 to 1993, Dr. Pace served as the deputy director and acting director of the Office of Space Commerce, in the Office of the Deputy Secretary of the Department of Commerce. Dr. Pace represented the department to the National Space Council and participated in efforts affecting export controls for space technologies, space trade negotiations with Japan, Russia, China, and Europe, the licensing process for private remote sensing systems, missile proliferation, and the U.S. space industrial base. Dr. Pace received a Ph.D. in policy analysis from the RAND Graduate School.

THOMAS E. ROMESSER is an independent consultant. Dr. Romesser was chief technology officer for Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems until the start of 2012 and sector vice president of Aerospace Systems. In those roles, he provided senior leadership representation with customers, universities, industry, and the rest of the corporation. He also was responsible for technology development to support future programs while maintaining close linkage to legacy programs. Prior to his

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×

present assignment, Dr. Romesser was sector vice president and general manager of the Technology and Emerging Systems Division for Northrop Grumman’s former Space Technology sector. In this role, he was responsible for the development and execution of Space Technology’s strategy to support both near- and long-term business objectives, system enhancements and technology leverage for new business pursuits. He oversaw activities of the Directed Energy Systems and Advanced Concepts organizations as well as the Space Technology Research Laboratories. Previously, Dr. Romesser was vice president of technology development; responsible for the identification, development, and acquisition of Space Technology’s strategic technologies; and managed discretionary investments in technology and product development. He joined Northrop Grumman via the acquisition of TRW in 2002. A vice president since 1998, he previously served as vice president and deputy of the Space and Electronics Engineering organization. Northrop Grumman Corporation is a leading global security company whose 120,000 employees provide innovative systems, products, and solutions in aerospace, electronics, information systems, shipbuilding and technical services to government and commercial customers worldwide. Prior to that, he was vice president and general manager of TRW’s Space and Technology Division; responsible for spacecraft hardware and software engineering; manufacturing, testing and space vehicle production; as well as chemical and solid-state laser design and development; sensor systems, space and tactical propulsion systems; and research in the physical, chemical and engineering sciences. Dr. Romesser earned a B.S. in physics from Manhattan College and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. He is also a graduate of the USC Executive Management Program. Dr. Romesser was elected a fellow of the Directed Energy Professional Society in 2002 and a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 2003.

WILLIAM L. SHELTON retired from the U.S. Air Force in September 2014. His last assignment was as commander, Air Force Space Command, Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, where he was responsible for organizing, equipping, training, and maintaining mission-ready space and cyberspace forces and capabilities for the North American Aerospace Defense Command, U.S. Strategic Command, and other combatant commands around the world. General Shelton oversaw Air Force network operations; managed a global network of satellite command and control, communications, missile warning and space launch facilities; and was responsible for space system development and acquisition. He led more than 42,000 professionals assigned to 134 locations worldwide. General Shelton entered the Air Force in 1976 as a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy. He served in various assignments, including research and development testing, space operations, and staff work. The general has commanded at the squadron, group, wing, and numbered air force levels, and served on the staffs at major command headquarters, Air Force

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×

headquarters, and in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Prior to assuming his final position, General Shelton was the assistant vice chief of staff and the director of Air Staff, U.S. Air Force, the Pentagon, Washington, D.C. He holds an M.S. in astronautical engineering from the U.S. Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio.

BOB THOMSON is an aerospace consultant and appointed visiting industry director of the Cal Poly CubeSat program. He joined Lockheed Martin in 1981 as an aerodynamics engineer focused on the F-117, U-2, and unmanned vehicle programs. Mr. Thomson assumed a range of progressively more responsible leadership positions, beginning with managing the payload and avionics subsystems for the Dark Star UAV program, evolving to his position as vice president, special programs, leading several multibillion-dollar satellite development programs critical to national security. These satellite development programs spanned the entire procurement life cycle: from the restart of a cold satellite production line, thereby avoiding a national imagery gap, to the capture and start-up of a brand new effort, to completing the integration, test, and subsequent launch of a national asset. His efforts resulted in more than $12 billion dollars of new business for Lockheed Martin. Since his retirement in 2011, Mr. Thomson has been engaged with the dean of engineering at Cal Poly on a variety of special topics. Mr. Thomson is a 1981 graduate of Cal Poly with a B.S. in aeronautical engineering.

DAVID M. VAN WIE is the mission area executive for precision strike at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) with responsibility for the strategic planning, executing, and performance of programs addressing detection and targeting, kinetic engagement, and electronic attack capabilities. Prior to his current assignment, Dr. Van Wie was the chief technologist for the Precision Strike Mission Area, where he focuses on technology development supporting asymmetric mulidomain system concepts for use in anti-access/area-denial environments. Dr. Van Wie holds a research faculty position in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at JHU and has lectured extensively in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland. He served on committees of the Academies addressing conventional prompt global strike, civil booster systems, and Air Force development planning. Dr. Van Wie also served as a member of the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board conducting studies on hypersonic systems, small precision weapons, virtual training technologies, future launch vehicles, and munitions for the environment in 2025 and beyond, and he served as the vice chair and chair of the 2010 and 2011 Air Force Research Laboratory Science and Technology Reviews, respectively. Dr. Van Wie is a fellow of the AIAA, an active member of the U.S. science and technology community, and has published extensively in the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
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fields of high-temperature fluid dynamics, plasma aerodynamics, and hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems.

DEBORAH L. WESTPHAL is managing director of the strategy advisory firm Toffler Associates. Recognized globally for her expertise in strategy, innovation, and organizational transformation, Ms. Westphal helps organizations understand the forces that drive change in their industries and the world, and identifies the best courses of action to create enduring success. Ms. Westphal came to Toffler Associates in 1999 after 13 years as a senior government official in the U.S. Air Force. Her work in the area of technology and advanced concepts for air vehicles, missiles, and space systems has been recognized with numerous awards from the California Air Force Association, a U.S. Air Force Meritorious Civilian Award, an Air Force Association Los Angeles Chapter Civilian of the Year award, and an Air Force Association Medal of Merit. Ms. Westphal has also served on the Army Science Board, the board of directors for the National Defense Industrial Association Greater Los Angeles Chapter, and the board of directors for the Air Force Association, Schriever Chapter 147. Currently, Ms. Westphal serves on the Air Force Studies Board of the Academies. Managing director of Toffler Associates since 2007, she is an acknowledged expert in the aerospace industry and brings a wealth of experience in a wide range of other sectors, including materials, transportation, security, space, hospitality, and telecommunications, as well as U.S. defense, intelligence, and civilian government. Ms. Westphal’s success can be traced to her unique combination of education and experience. Holding a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of New Mexico, she went on to get an MBA from Webster University, and has completed executive education at the Harvard Business School and the Wharton School of Business.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×
Page 50
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×
Page 54
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×
Page 55
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. National Security Space Defense and Protection: Public Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23594.
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Next: Appendix B: Meetings and Speakers »
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It is not yet 60 years since the first artificial satellite was placed into Earth orbit. In just over a half century, mankind has gone from no presence in outer space to a condition of high dependence on orbiting satellites. These sensors, receivers, transmitters, and other such devices, as well as the satellites that carry them, are components of complex space systems that include terrestrial elements, electronic links between and among components, organizations to provide the management, care and feeding, and launch systems that put satellites into orbit. In many instances, these space systems connect with and otherwise interact with terrestrial systems; for example, a very long list of Earth-based systems cannot function properly without information from the Global Positioning System (GPS).

Space systems are fundamental to the information business, and the modern world is an information-driven one. In addition to navigation (and associated timing), space systems provide communications and imagery and other Earth-sensing functions. Among these systems are many that support military, intelligence, and other national security functions of the United States and many other nations. Some of these are unique government, national security systems; however, functions to support national security are also provided by commercial and civil-government space systems.


The importance of space systems to the United States and its allies and potential adversaries raises major policy issues. National Security Space Defense and Protection reviews the range of options available to address threats to space systems, in terms of deterring hostile actions, defeating hostile actions, and surviving hostile actions, and assesses potential strategies and plans to counter such threats. This report recommends architectures, capabilities, and courses of action to address such threats and actions to address affordability, technology risk, and other potential barriers or limiting factors in implementing such courses of action.

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