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Impact of Firearms Laws on Airports (2016)

Chapter: XI. STATE LAWS APPLICABLE TO INDIVIDUALS CARRYING A FIREARM IN VIOLATION OF THEIR LICENSE OR PERMIT

« Previous: X. WHETHER THE CARRYING OF A FIREARM IN AN AIRPORT IS A DISTURBANCE OF THE PEACE OR VIOLATES OTHER STATE OR LOCAL LAWS
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Suggested Citation:"XI. STATE LAWS APPLICABLE TO INDIVIDUALS CARRYING A FIREARM IN VIOLATION OF THEIR LICENSE OR PERMIT." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Impact of Firearms Laws on Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23597.
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Suggested Citation:"XI. STATE LAWS APPLICABLE TO INDIVIDUALS CARRYING A FIREARM IN VIOLATION OF THEIR LICENSE OR PERMIT." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Impact of Firearms Laws on Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23597.
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Suggested Citation:"XI. STATE LAWS APPLICABLE TO INDIVIDUALS CARRYING A FIREARM IN VIOLATION OF THEIR LICENSE OR PERMIT." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Impact of Firearms Laws on Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23597.
×
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Suggested Citation:"XI. STATE LAWS APPLICABLE TO INDIVIDUALS CARRYING A FIREARM IN VIOLATION OF THEIR LICENSE OR PERMIT." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Impact of Firearms Laws on Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23597.
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Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

44 enacted statutes requiring an individual to have a license to carry a firearm openly.459 When an individual applies for a license, there is usually a long list of statutory conditions that the carried, brandished, or displayed under circumstances that create a reasonable apprehension on the part of members of the public or a law enforcement official that a crime is being committed or is about to be committed.457 To summarize this section, the mere possession of a firearm may not necessarily constitute a violation of a statute that prohibits disorderly conduct; how- ever, depending on the circumstances and a person’s other conduct, the possession of a firearm could result in a violation of one of the statutes described in this section. XI. STATE LAWS APPLICABLE TO INDIVIDUALS CARRYING A FIREARM IN VIOLATION OF THEIR LICENSE OR PERMIT A. A Licensee’s or Permittee’s Continuing Obligation to Comply with the Conditions for a License or Permit Virtually all states have statutes that authorize the granting of a license to carry a concealed firearm such as a pistol or revolver.458 At least 15 states have 457 lA. rev. stAt. Ann. §§ 40:1382(A), (B) (2015) (empha- sis added). 458 Ark. Code Ann. §§ 5-73-301, 5-73-302, 5-73-315 (2015) (applicable to a license to carry a concealed hand- gun); CAl. penAl Code § 26150 (Deering 2015) (applicable to license to carry a concealed firearm); CAl. penAl Code § 26155 (Deering 2015) (setting forth conditions for a license to carry a firearm “capable of being concealed” on a person); flA. stAt. Ann. § 790.015(1) (LexisNexis 2015) (applicable to carrying a concealed weapon or firearm); flA. stAt. Ann. § 790.06(1) (LexisNexis 2015) (applicable to a license to carry concealed weapon or firearm); gA. Code Ann. § 16-11-126(h) (2015) (setting forth conditions for the issuance of a weapons-carry license); idAho Code Ann. § 18-3302(2015); kAn. stAt. Ann. § 75-7c03 (2015); ky. rev. stAt. Ann. § 237.110(a) (LexisNexis 2015) (applicable to license to carry concealed firearms or other deadly weapons); lA. rev. stAt. Ann. § 40:1379.1.1 (2015); me rev. stAt. tit. 25, § 2001-A(2) (2015); me rev. stAt. tit. 25, § 2003 (2015); miCh. Comp. lAWs serv. § 28.432a (LexisNexis2015); miss. Code Ann. § 45-9-101(1)(a) (2015); mo. rev. stAt. § 571.030.1 (2015); mo. rev. stAt. § 571.037 (2015) (stating when open display of concealed firearm is permitted); mo. rev. stAt. §§ 571.030(1), (4) (2015) (con- cealed-carry permit); mo. rev. stAt. § 571.107 (2015); mont. Code Ann. § 45-8-316 (prohibiting concealed weap- ons); mont. Code Ann. § 45-8-321 (2015) (permit to carry concealed weapon); mont. Code Ann. § 45-8-328 (2015); neB. rev. stAt. Ann. §§ 17-556, 14-102(6) (LexisNexis 2015) (cities of metropolitan class have power to punish carrying of concealed weapons except in regard to the carrying of a concealed handgun in compliance with the Concealed Handgun Permit Act); neB. rev. stAt. Ann. § 28-1202(2) (LexisNexis 2015) (carrying of a concealed weapon not an offense if the person holds valid permit under Concealed Handgun Permit Act); neB. rev. stAt. Ann. §§ 69-2428, 69-2429 (LexisNexis 2015) (permit to carry concealed handgun); neB. rev. stAt. Ann. §§ 69-2435, 69-2445 (LexisNexis 2015); nev. rev. stAt. Ann. § 202.3657 (LexisNexis 2015) (application for permit to carry a concealed handgun); nev. rev. stAt. Ann. § 202.3673 (LexisNexis 2015); N.H. rev. stAt. Ann. § 159:4 (LexisNexis 2015) (unlawful to carry a loaded pistol or revolver in any vehi- cle or concealed upon his person without a valid license); N.M. stAt. Ann. § 29-19-12 (LexisNexis 2015) (Concealed Handgun Carry Act); N.C. gen. stAt. § 14-269(a1)(2) (unlawful to carry a concealed handgun without a permit); N.C. gen. stAt. § 14-415.11(a) (2015) (authorizing an indi- vidual to carry concealed handgun with a permit); N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-03-01 (2015) (person with a license to carry a concealed handgun not subject to time-of-day restrictions when carrying a handgun); N.D. Cent. Code §§ 62.1-04-01, 62.1-04-02 (2015) (requiring a license to carry a concealed weapon); ohio rev. Code Ann. §§ 2923.125, 2923.126 (LexisNexis 2015) (applicable to licenses to carry a concealed handgun); or. rev. stAt. § 166.291(a) (2015) (applicable to license to carry a concealed handgun); or. rev. stAt. §§ 166.250(1)(c)(A), (B)(i)-(ii) (2015) (unlawful possession by minors); or. rev. stAt. § 166.291 (2015); 18 pA. Cons. stAt. Ann. § 6109 (2015); R.I. gen. lAWs § 11-47- 11(a) (2105) (regarding license to carry concealed pistol or revolver); S.C. Code Ann. § 16-23-20(9)(b) (2015) (carrying of concealed weapon permissible if permit issued in accor- dance with Title 23, Chapter 31, Article 4); S.C. Code Ann. §§ 16-23-460(B)(1), (c) (2015) (concealed weapon statute not applicable to person in compliance with Title 23, Chapter 31, Article 4 or to rifles or shotguns); S.C. Code Ann. § 23-31-215(A) (2015) (regarding issuance of permit to carry a concealable weapon); S.D. Codified lAWs §§ 22-14-9(1), (2) (2015) (unlawful to carry a pistol or revolver, loaded or unloaded, concealed on his person or while operating a vehicle without a permit as provided in Chapter 23-7); S.D. Codified lAWs §§ 23-7-7, 23-7-7.1, 23-7-8, 23-7-8.1, 23-7-8.2, 23-7-8.6 (2015) (regarding permit to carry concealed pistol); utAh Code Ann. § 6-10-504 (LexisNexis 2015) (unlawful to carry concealed firearm except as provided in § 76-10-503); utAh Code Ann. § 76-10-504(1) (LexisNexis 2015) (prohibiting a person from carrying a concealed firearm except as provided in §§ 76-10-503(2), (3), and (4), including an unloaded firearm “or one that is readily accessible for immediate use”); utAh Code Ann. § 76-10-523(2) (2015) (stating that §§ 76-10-504(1) and (2) and 76-10-505 not applicable to a person having a permit to carry a concealed firearm); utAh Code Ann. § 53-5-704 (2015) (permit to carry concealed firearm); utAh Code Ann. § 53-5-705 (2015) (regarding issuance of temporary permit to carry concealed firearm); utAh Code Ann. § 53-5- 507 (2015) (regarding permit to carry concealed firearm); vA. Code Ann. § 18.2-308(A) (2015) (prohibiting concealed weapons); vA. Code Ann. § 18.2-308.01(A) (carrying of a concealed weapon permitted when a person has a valid concealed handgun permit); W. vA. Code Ann. § 61-7-4(a) (2015) (concealed weapons permits authorized only for pistols or revolvers); WAsh. rev. Code Ann. § 9.41.070 (LexisNexis 2015) (applicable to license to carry a con- cealed pistol); Wis. stAt. § 175.60 (2015) (license to carry concealed weapon); Wyo. stAt. Ann. § 6-8-104 (2015) (con- cealed weapon permit). 459 See Open Carrying Policy Summary, lAW Center to

45 In most states, when a person no longer qualifies, there is a prescribed procedure for the revocation of the license.461 For example, in Idaho, the sheriff is empowered to revoke a license “subsequent to a hear- ing” for three reasons, including the licensee’s “doing of an act or [the] existence of a condition that would have been grounds for the denial of the license by the sheriff….”462 The commissioner of the Kentucky State Police is directed to “revoke the license of any person who becomes permanently ineligible to be issued a license or have a license renewed under the criteria set forth in this section.”463 In some states, however, an individual’s later ineligibility serves automatically to invalidate or revoke the person’s license or permit. Under Min- nesota law, a “permit to carry is void at the time that the holder becomes prohibited by law from possessing a firearm, in which event the holder must return the permit card to the issuing sheriff within five business days after the holder knows or should know that the holder is a prohibited per- son.”464 Furthermore, “[w]hen a permit holder is convicted of an offense that prohibits the permit holder from possessing a firearm, the court must take possession of the permit, if it is available, and send it to the issuing sheriff.”465 In Nebraska, a permittee must continue to meet the requirements of Section 69-2433 of the Nebraska Revised Statutes while holding a permit. Whenever applicant must meet to qualify for a license.460 After a license is issued, a licensee may become ineligible for the reason that he or she no longer meets one or more of the statutory conditions for a license. When a law enforcement officer encounters some- one in an airport carrying a firearm who has a license to carry a firearm or a concealed firearm, there are federal and state databases that enable an officer to verify the validity of a firearm license. There are other databases that may disclose whether a licensee no longer satisfies one or more of the con- ditions under which a license was issued, such as a conviction for a felony or other serious offense. prevent gun violenCe, http://smartgunlaws.org/open- carrying-policy-summary/#identifier_13_5940 (last accessed Mar. 10, 2016) (naming Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Tennes- see, Texas, and Utah) (citations omitted). See also Conn. gen. stAt. § 29-35(a) (2015) (providing that only in a per- son’s home or place of business may a person carry a pistol or revolver without a permit to carry); minn. stAt. § 624.714 (2015) (concerning issuance of a permit to carry a pistol); N.J. rev. stAt. § 2C:39-5(b)(1) (2015) (unlawful to possess a handgun without having a permit to carry the same as provided in § 2C:58-4); N.J. rev. stAt. § 2C:39-5(c) (2015) (unlawful to possess rifle or shotgun without a fire- arms purchase identification card); oklA. stAt. tit. 21, § 1272(A)(2) (2015) (unlawful to carry any pistol, revolver, shotgun, or rifle, loaded or unloaded, except as permitted by statute or Oklahoma Self-Defense Act); R.I. gen. lAWs § 11-47-8(a) (2015) (unlawful with some exceptions to carry a pistol or revolver in a vehicle or on his or her per- son without a license or permit as provided in §§ 11-47-11, 11-47-12, and 11-47-18); R.I. gen. lAWs § 11-47-11(a) (2015) (regarding issuance of a license to carry); tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1315 (2015) (designating classes of per- sons authorized to carry handguns including “[a]ny other officer or person authorized to carry handguns by this[] or any other law of this state”); tenn. Code Ann. §§ 39-17-308, 39-17-1351(b) (2015) (regarding issuance of a handgun carry permit); tex. penAl Code Ann. §§ 46.02(a)(1), (2) (2015). 460 AlA. Code § 13A-11-175(a)(1) (LexisNexis 2015) (regarding license to carry a concealed weapon); Conn. gen. stAt. § 29-38 (2015) (regarding a permit to carry a pistol or revolver); gA. Code Ann. §§ 16-11-129(b)(2)(A)– (L) (2015) (setting forth conditions an applicant must meet for issuance of weapons-carry license); idAho Code Ann. §§ 18-3302(11)(a)-(m) (2015); lA. rev. stAt. Ann. §§ 40:1379.13(C)(1)–(19) (2015); minn. stAt. § 624.714(2) (b) (2015) (setting forth conditions for issuance of permit to carry a pistol); miss. Code Ann. §§ 45-9-101(2)(b)-(l), 45-9-101(3) (2015); nev. rev. stAt. Ann. §§ 202.3657(4)-(6) (LexisNexis 2015) (appears to apply to a permit to carry a concealed handgun); N.Y. penAl lAW § 400.00(1) (Consol. 2015) (conditions for issuance of license to carry a fire- arm); S.D. Codified lAWs § 23-7-7.1 (2015); utAh Code Ann. § 53-5-704(2)(a) (LexisNexis 2015) (stating grounds for denying, suspending, or revoking concealed firearm permit); W. vA. Code Ann. § 61-7-4(a)(4) (LexisNexis 2015) (stating conditions for issuance of concealed weapons permit); Wis. stAt. §§ 175.60(3), (11) (2015); Wyo. stAt. Ann. §§ 6-8-104(b)(v)-(vi) (2015). 461 flA. stAt. Ann. § 790.06(2) (LexisNexis 2015) (stat- ing the conditions for issuing a license to carry a con- cealed weapon); flA. stAt. Ann. § 790.06(10) (LexisNexis 2015) (stating the circumstances under any one of which a license to carry a concealed firearm is to be suspended or revoked); ky. rev. stAt. Ann. § 237.110(4) (LexisNexis 2015) (stating the conditions for granting or renewing a license to carry a concealed firearm); ohio rev. Code Ann. § 2923.125(D) (LexisNexis 2015) (regarding license to carry a concealed handgun); 18 pA. Cons. stAt. §§ 6109(e)(1)(i)–(xiv) (2015) (stating conditions for issu- ance of concealed weapons permit); 18 pA. Cons. stAt. § 6109(i) (2015) (providing that a license to carry firearms may be revoked for good cause and shall be revoked “for any reason stated in subsection (e)(1)….”); Wis. stAt. §§ 175.60(14)(a), (am) (stating when license will be revoked or suspended); tex. gov’t Code § 411.172 (2016) (stating conditions for a license to carry a handgun, with the term “concealed” having been deleted from the 2015 version of the statute). 462 idAho Code Ann. § 18-3302K(12) (2015) (applicable to enhanced licenses to carry concealed weapons). 463 ky. rev. stAt. Ann. §§ 237.110(13)(a), (b) (2015). See also Wyo. stAt. Ann. § 6-8-104(q) (2015) (stating that a con- cealed weapon permit “shall be revoked” if the permittee becomes ineligible for a permit under the section). 464 minn. stAt. § 624.714(8)(a) (2015) (emphasis added). 465 minn. stAt. § 624.714(8)(B) (2015).

46 been either a patient in a rehabilitation program pursuant to a court order or otherwise hospital- ized for the abuse of or an addiction to alcohol or a controlled substance in the previous 10 years; and must not have been a voluntary patient in a reha- bilitation program or voluntarily hospitalized for the abuse of or addiction to alcohol or a controlled substance in the previous 3 years; ∙ Must not have been convicted of the offense of driving under the influence of an intoxicant in Tennessee or any other state two or more times in the previous 10 years with no conviction having occurred in the previous 5 years; ∙ Must not have been adjudicated as mentally defective, judicially committed to or hospitalized in a mental institution, had a court appointed conser- vator by reason of a mental defect, judicially deter- mined to be disabled by reason of a mental illness, developmental disability or other mental incapac- ity, and in the previous 7 years not found by a court to pose an immediate substantial likelihood of serious harm because of mental illness; ∙ Must not be an alien or be illegally in the United States; ∙ Must not have been discharged from the armed forces under dishonorable conditions; ∙ Must not have renounced his or her United States citizenship; ∙ Must not have been convicted of a misdemean- or crime of domestic violence; ∙ Must not be receiving Social Security disability benefits because of alcohol dependence, drug depen- dence, or mental disability; and ∙ Must not have been convicted of stalking.471 In Kentucky, an applicant cannot “owe a child support arrearage,” as further elaborated in the statute, and must have “complied with any sub- poena or warrant relating to child support or paternity proceedings.”472 One of the conditions in Oregon for the issuance of a license to carry a con- cealed handgun is that the applicant cannot be someone who is required to register as a sex offender in any state.473 As discussed in Section XIII, a law enforcement official has the authority when a licensee is carry- ing a firearm to verify the validity of the person’s required license and quite possibly to determine preliminarily whether the licensee still meets the requirements for a license; for example, by a permittee fails to meet one or more of the require- ments, the permit holder must return his or her per- mit to the Nebraska State Patrol for revocation.466 In New York, if a licensee is convicted of a felony or other serious offense or for any other reason is no longer eligible for a license, the person’s ineligibility “operate[s] as a revocation of the license.”467 In South Carolina, a person’s concealed weapons permit “must be surrendered…if the permit holder becomes a per- son prohibited under state law from possessing a weapon.”468 In West Virginia, a sheriff is authorized to revoke an existing license for a concealed weapons permit if the holder has violated any of the require- ments for the issuance of his or her permit.469 In summary, in some states whenever a licensee no longer meets the qualifications for his or her license, the licensee no longer has a legal right to carry a firearm, except possibly in those situations when the person may carry a firearm without a license. Depending on the condition that a licensee no longer satisfies (e.g., no felony conviction), an individual could, however, be prohibited from pos- sessing a firearm in an airport or anywhere. As explained in the following section, states have numerous conditions that must be satisfied at all times that are relevant whenever there is a question as to whether a person is lawfully carrying a firearm in an airport or elsewhere.470 B. Statutory Eligibility Conditions for a License to Carry a Firearm or to Carry a Concealed Firearm Tennessee has approximately 20 conditions for the issuance or renewal of a permit to carry a hand- gun. Tennessee requires that an applicant: ∙ Must not be prohibited from purchasing or pos- sessing a firearm under Tennessee law, the law of another state, or federal law; ∙ Must not be presently indicted for or convicted of a felony or one of several disqualifying misde- meanors; ∙ Must not be subject presently to any “order of protection”; ∙ Must not be a fugitive; ∙ Must not be an unlawful user of or addicted to alcohol or any controlled substance; must not have 466 neB. rev. stAt. Ann. § 69-2435 (LexisNexis 2015) (except as provided in § 69-2433(4)). 467 N.Y. penAl lAW § 400.00(11)(a) (Consol. 2015). See also me. rev. stAt. tit. 25, §§ 2003(1)(D)(5)(a)-(ff) (2015). 468 S.C. Code Ann. § 23-31-25(F)(2) (2015). 469 W. vA. Code Ann. § 61-7-4(n) (LexisNexis 2015). 470 Wis. stAt. §§ 175.60(112)(b)(1)(a), (12g) (2015) (law enforcement officer is authorized to “confirm” whether license is valid). 471 tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(b) (2015). 472 ky. rev. stAt. Ann. §§ 237.110(4)(f), (g) (LexisNexis 2015). 473 or. rev. stAt. § 166.291(1)(o) (2015).

47 person is merely transporting the firearm through the state.”479 In some states, the appropriate state official, often the state attorney general, is authorized to enter into reciprocity agreements with other states.480 Thus, in Idaho the attorney general con- tacts the “appropriate officials in other states for the purpose of establishing, to the extent possible, recog- nition and reciprocity of the enhanced license to carry a concealed weapon by other states, whether by formal agreement or otherwise.”481 In Ohio, [a] person who holds a valid concealed handgun license issued by another state that is recognized by the attorney general pursuant to a reciprocity agreement…has the same right to carry a concealed handgun in this state as a person who was issued a concealed handgun license…and is sub- ject to the same restrictions that apply to a person who car- ries a license issued under that section.482 The attorney general in Pennsylvania is autho- rized “to enter into reciprocity agreements with other states providing for the mutual recognition of a license to carry a firearm issued by the Commonwealth and a license or permit to carry a firearm issued by the other state.”483 As of January 1, 2016, the governor of Texas is directed to negotiate agreements with other states that issue a license to carry a handgun so that a license issued by one state is recognized by the other state, as further provided in the statute.484 In brief, as discussed in this section, under state laws authorizing the issuance of a license to carry a firearm or a concealed firearm, licensees have a con- tinuing obligation to comply with the conditions under which their license was issued. Many states have pro- cedures for the recognition of out-of-state licenses; however, some states recognize out-of-state licenses automatically, whereas other states have require- ments that must be met prior to the recognition of an out-of-state license. Some states authorize a state offi- cial, usually the state’s attorney general, to enter into reciprocity agreements with other states for the mutual recognition of licenses to carry a firearm. consulting national and state databases that are available to law enforcement officials.474 C. Whether an Out-of-State License or Permit Is Valid in Another State Airport authorities and law enforcement offi- cers may be interested in whether a license issued in another state is valid in the state where an individual is carrying a firearm in an airport. Although there are differences from state to state, both in the procedures and in what each state rec- ognizes, many states have a procedure for the rec- ognition of licenses issued in other states to carry a firearm or to carry a concealed firearm.475 Some states recognize out-of-state licenses automati- cally;476 however, other states have requirements that must be met prior to recognizing an out-of- state license. The requirements in Michigan for a license to carry a concealed pistol do not apply to a licensed resident of another state.477 In Tennessee, a “facially valid handgun firearm[] per- mit” issued by another state is recognized but only for carrying a handgun.478 Rhode Island’s licens- ing requirements do not apply to the holder of a license issued by another state “provided the 474 Wis. stAt. §§ 175.60(112)(b)(1)(a), (12g) (2015) (autho- rizing a law enforcement officer to “confirm” whether a license is valid). 475 See, e.g., Conn. gen. stAt. § 29-28(f) (2015) (holder of license from another state to carry a pistol or revolver may apply “directly” to the Commissioner of Emergency Ser- vices and Public Protection for a permit); ky. rev. stAt. Ann. §§ 237.110(20)(a), (b) (LexisNexis 2015); lA. rev. stAt. Ann. § 40.1379.3(T)(5) (2015); miss. Code Ann. § 45-9- 101(19) (2015); mo. rev. stAt. § 571.107(1) (2015); N.M. stAt. Ann. § 29-19-12(E) (LexisNexis 2015); N.C. gen. stAt. § 14-415.24(a) (2015) (state Department of Justice to determine whether other states allow North Carolina res- idents to carry concealed handgun in their state); N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-04-03.1 (2015); S.C. Code Ann. § 23-31- 215(N) (2015) (setting forth conditions for recognition of valid out-of-state permit to carry concealable weapons). 476 AlA. Code § 13A-11-85 (LexisNexis 2015) (person licensed to carry a handgun in any state authorized to carry a handgun in Alabama); me. rev. stAt. tit. 25, § 2001-A(2)(F) (2015); minn. stAt. §§ 624.714(16)(a), (b) (2015) (regarding recognition of permits issued in other states but providing that a permit from another state is not valid “if the holder is or becomes prohibited by law from possessing a firearm”); utAh Code Ann. § 53-5-704(4)(a) (LexisNexis 2015); WAsh. rev. Code Ann. § 9.41.073(1) (a) (LexisNexis 2015) (setting forth two conditions for recognition of a license issued in another state to carry a pistol); W. vA. Code Ann. §§ 61-7-6(a) (6), 61-7-6a (LexisNexis 2015) (stating requirements for rec- ognition of out-of-state handgun permit). 477 miCh. Comp. lAWs serv. § 28.432a(1)(h) (LexisNexis 2015). 478 tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(r)(1) (2015). 479 R.I. gen. lAWs § 11-47-8(a) (2015); see also R.I. gen. lAWs § 11-47-11(a) (2015) (recognizing out-of-state license to carry concealed weapons). 480 tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(r)(3)(A) (2015) (requir- ing commissioner of safety to enter into written reciproc- ity agreements); Wis. stAt. § 175.60(18) (2015) (relating to reciprocity agreements). 481 idAho Code Ann. § 18-3302k(14) (2015). 482 ohio rev. Code Ann. § 2923.126(D) (LexisNexis 2015) (emphasis added). 483 18 pA. Cons. stAt. § 6109(k)(1) (2015). 484 tex. gov’t Code Ann. § 411.173 (2016).

Next: XII. RELATIONSHIP OF STATE STATUTES AND LOCAL LAWS REGULATING FIREARMS AT AIRPORTS »
Impact of Firearms Laws on Airports Get This Book
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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Legal Research Digest 29: Impact of Firearms Laws on Airports analyzes recent court cases on federal and state laws that have been challenged for restricting or prohibiting the carrying of firearms in public and other places.

The right to carry guns at airports is subject to the U.S. Constitution, federal and state legislation, and judicial decisions. Some state laws allow guns to be carried openly in public places. Most state laws regulate how guns are to be carried in a vehicle or left in a public or an employer’s parking lot. These and other state laws also have ramifications for commercial airports in the United States.

Accompanying the report are appendices available online:

  • Appendix A: Survey Questions
  • Appendix B: List of Airports and Airport Authorities Responding to the Survey
  • Appendix C: Summary of Responses by Airports and Airport Authorities to the Survey
  • Appendix D: ACRP Web Only Document 29: Compendium of State and Federal Laws Affecting the Possession of Firearms at Airports
  • Appendix E: Airport Ordinances, Policies, and Rules and Regulations Provided by Airports Responding to the Survey
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