National Academies Press: OpenBook

Tendances Récentes de la Fécondité en Afrique Subsaharienne: Synthèse de l'Atelier (2016)

Chapter: Annexe B: Liste des participants a l'atelier

« Previous: Annexe A: Programme de l'atelier
Suggested Citation:"Annexe B: Liste des participants a l'atelier." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Tendances Récentes de la Fécondité en Afrique Subsaharienne: Synthèse de l'Atelier. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23610.
×

Annexe B

Liste des participants à l'atelier

Jacob Adetunji

Samuel Agyei-Mensah

Akin Bankole

Alix Beatty

Donatien Beguy (via Skype)

Ann Biddlecom

Kristin Bietsch

Alison Bodenheimer

John Bongaarts

Jason Bremner

David Canning

John Casterline

Yoonjoung Choi

John Cleland

Julie DaVanzo

Peter Donaldson

Parfait M. Eloundou-Enyegue

Tim Evans

Alex Ezeh

Rachel Friedman

Sarah Garver

Mary Ghitelman

Michele Gragnolati

Sahlu Haile

Reid Hamel

Margareta N. Harrit

Rifat Hasan

Robert Hauser

Véronique Hertrich

Mahesh Karra

Kristina Kastler

Kevin Kinsella

Jean-François Kobiané

Kavitha Krishnan

David Lam

Tina M. Latimer

Marlene Lee

Christophe Lemiere

Qingfeng Li

Landis MacKellar

John May

Cheikh Mbacké

Tyler McCormick

Geoff McNicoll

Scott Moreland

Jotham Musinguzi

Maggwa Baker Ndugga

Crystal Lee Perez

James Phillips

Thomas J. Plewes

Suggested Citation:"Annexe B: Liste des participants a l'atelier." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Tendances Récentes de la Fécondité en Afrique Subsaharienne: Synthèse de l'Atelier. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23610.
×

Ndola Prata

Stephanie Psaki

Sangeeta Raja

Susan Rich

Clémentine Rossier

Ellen Starbird

Ian Timaeus

Amy Tsui

Linnea Zimmerman

Eliya Zulu

Suggested Citation:"Annexe B: Liste des participants a l'atelier." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Tendances Récentes de la Fécondité en Afrique Subsaharienne: Synthèse de l'Atelier. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23610.
×
Page 77
Suggested Citation:"Annexe B: Liste des participants a l'atelier." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Tendances Récentes de la Fécondité en Afrique Subsaharienne: Synthèse de l'Atelier. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23610.
×
Page 78
Next: Annexe C: Biographie succincte des membres du comite directeur »
Tendances Récentes de la Fécondité en Afrique Subsaharienne: Synthèse de l'Atelier Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $49.00 Buy Ebook | $39.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Note: This is the French translation of Recent Fertility Trends in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Fertility rates and population growth influence economic development. The marked declines in fertility seen in some developing nations have been accompanied by slowing population growth, which in turn provided a window of opportunity for rapid economic growth. For many sub-Saharan African nations, this window has not yet opened because fertility rates have not declined as rapidly there as elsewhere.

Fertility rates in many sub-Saharan African countries are high: the total rate for the region is estimated to be 5.1 births per woman, and rates that had begun to decline in many countries in the region have stalled. High rates of fertility in these countries are likely to contribute to continued rapid population growth: the United Nations projects that the region's population will increase by 1.2 billion by 2050, the highest growth among the regions for which there are projections.

In June 2015, the Committee on Population organized a workshop to explore fertility trends and the factors that have influenced them. The workshop committee was asked to explore history and trends related to fertility, proximate determinants and other influences, the status and impact of family planning programs, and prospects for further reducing fertility rates. This study will help donors, researchers, and policy makers better understand the factors that may explain the slow pace of fertility decline in this region, and develop methods to improve family planning in sub-Saharan Africa.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!