National Academies Press: OpenBook

Livable Transit Corridors: Methods, Metrics, and Strategies (2016)

Chapter: Appendix E - People and Place Livability Combinations

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Page 105
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E - People and Place Livability Combinations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Livable Transit Corridors: Methods, Metrics, and Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23630.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E - People and Place Livability Combinations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Livable Transit Corridors: Methods, Metrics, and Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23630.
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Page 106
Page 107
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E - People and Place Livability Combinations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Livable Transit Corridors: Methods, Metrics, and Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23630.
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Page 107
Page 108
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E - People and Place Livability Combinations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Livable Transit Corridors: Methods, Metrics, and Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23630.
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Page 108

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105 As discussed in Section 2, each corridor type can be distinguished by its combination of people and place factors. The various combinations of these characteristics, and the degree to which these combinations are consistent with and mutually reinforce each other, help determine the quality of transit corridor livability. For ease of interpretation, these factors combine and interact along a simple continuum: low- to high-quality of transit corridor livability opportunities. The discussion of people and place interactions for High-Quality Transit, Walking, and Bicycling Opportunities Principle is provided in Section 1. Additional discussion of the people and place interactions for the remaining Transit Corridor Livability Principles are provided in this appendix. Mixed-Income Housing Near Transit Affordable housing is a combination of the amount and diversity of housing for a variety of incomes (place), and the degree to which the housing in the corridor is available to a diverse population (people). Figure E-1 illustrates how these two factors interact to create mixed-income housing opportunities near transit, with the darkest box representing the highest level of livability opportunities. Different combinations of these people and place factors create a set of four transit corridor livability categories with varying qualities of mixed-income housing and population diversity (including age, race, income, and education). Transit-Accessible Economic Opportunities While there are many important aspects of economic life, economic livability opportunities can be reduced to two essential components: employment (place) and consumer opportunities (people). Labeling these components as people and place factors may seem arbitrary—for example, employment is arguably as much about people as it is about place. However, this distinction is useful for this typology since retail usually moves to where people live, and decisions regarding location of nonretail employment generally relate to the quality of places, for example, access to markets, suppliers, or clusters of innovation. Figure E-2 illustrates how employment and consumer opportunities interact, with the upper- right quadrant representing the highest level of livability opportunities. Varying combinations of these people and place factors create a set of four transit corridor livability categories with varying qualities of employment and consumer opportunities. A P P E N D I X E People and Place Livability Combinations

106 Livable Transit Corridors: Methods, Metrics, and Strategies Figure E-1. Mixed-income housing (place) and population diversity (people) factor combinations. Figure E-2. Employment opportunities (place) and consumer opportunities (people) factor combinations. Accessible Social and Government Services Accessible government services provide an important foundation for building a community with rich livability opportunities. Effective planning and public policies (place) that address the needs and desires of corridor residents can encourage civic-mindedness and community involvement. Accessibility to critical services (people) such as education and health care are a direct result of effective governmental policies and public involvement. Figure E-3 illustrates how

People and Place Livability Combinations 107 corridor access to government services (place), and social services (people) opportunities interact, with upper-right quadrant representing the highest level of livability opportunities. Vibrant and Accessible Community, Cultural, and Recreational Opportunities Vibrant community, cultural, and recreational opportunities are (in part) a consequence of accessibility, and accessibility in a transit corridor is highly dependent on urban form patterns. Compact urban form patterns allow for more efficient use of the resources required to build and maintain streets, sewers, and energy infrastructure, to name a few. Well-designed public works investments—such as parks and other public spaces—create cost-effective cultural and recreational opportunities for people to enhance their quality of life. Figure E-4 illustrates how urban form (place), and community, cultural, and recreational (people) opportunities interact, with the upper-right quadrant representing the highest level of livability opportunities. Healthy, Safe, Walkable Transit Corridor Neighborhoods Neighborhood safety is an important element of livability. In transit corridors, neighborhood design and infrastructure influence how people feel about walking and riding bicycles, thus affect- ing the physical health of the population. The combination of a pedestrian-oriented environment (place) and neighborhood safety from crimes and traffic collisions (people) can have important effects on public health and livability outcomes. These interactions are illustrated in Figure E-5 with the upper-right quadrant representing the highest level of livability opportunities. Figure E-3. Accessible social services (people) and effective government services (place) factor combinations.

108 Livable Transit Corridors: Methods, Metrics, and Strategies Figure E-4. Vibrant and accessible community, cultural, and recreational opportunities factor combinations. Figure E-5. Pedestrian-oriented environment (place) and neighborhood safety (people) factor combinations.

Next: Appendix F - Metrics, Methods, and Data »
Livable Transit Corridors: Methods, Metrics, and Strategies Get This Book
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TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Research Report 187: Livable Transit Corridors: Methods, Metrics, and Strategies presents practical planning and implementation strategies to enhance livability in transit corridors. This Handbook provides a resource for planning practitioners, policy makers, and other stakeholders to measure, understand, and improve transit corridor livability.

The handbook provides a definition of transit corridor livability and a set of methods, metrics, and strategies—framed within a five-step visioning and improvement process—that communities can use to improve livability in their transit corridors. It includes a set of tools and techniques that can help in planning and building support for corridor improvements, screening alternatives in preparation for environmental review, identifying a corridor’s livability needs, and developing an action-oriented set of strategies for improving transit corridor livability and quality of life.

A spreadsheet-based Transit Corridor Livability Calculator tool is available for download. Instructions for using the Calculator tool are embedded within. Additional guidance in the form of a User Manual can be found in Appendix H of TCRP Research Report 187. To ensure the Calculator tool is fully-functional, make sure the tool's spreadsheet file and the TCRP Research Report 187 PDF file are both saved to the same directory folder on your computer.

Any digital files or software included is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences or the Transportation Research Board (collectively “TRB”) be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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