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A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium (2016)

Chapter: B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
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B

Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members

NADINE AUBRY is University Distinguished Professor and dean of the Northeastern University College of Engineering, is a widely known leader in the field of fluid dynamics, particularly the modeling of open flow turbulence and other complex flows and systems using advanced decomposition techniques and dynamical systems theory. She also made noteworthy contributions to the field of microfluidics. For these and other contributions to the profession, Dr. Aubry was elected as a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the American Association for the Advancement of Science(AAAS), the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), and the National Academy of Inventors. Other recognitions include the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award from the Society of Automotive Engineers. She has served as chair of the U.S. National Committee for Theoretical and Applied Mechanics of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, as chair of the U.S. delegation to the International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (IUTAM), as past chair of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics and as a member of the bureau of IUTAM. Dr. Aubry has also been serving on many APS and ASME committees, numerous NSF and Academies review panels, and a number of advisory boards and review panels in the United States and in foreign countries, including Austria, France, Portugal, Singapore, and South Korea. She has given numerous invited lectures on her research at various universities and conferences. Before joining Northeastern, she was the Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor, University Professor and head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University.

M. KATHERINE BANKS is the vice chancellor for engineering for the Texas A&M University System, dean of the Dwight Look College of Engineering at Texas A&M University, and director of the Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station (TEES). As vice chancellor, Dr. Banks oversees coordination and collaboration among the engineering, academic, and research programs at nine universities throughout the A&M system, as well as three state agencies: TEES, Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service and Texas A&M Transportation Institute. As TEES director, Dr. Banks oversees research administration of more than 4,800 projects and $208 million in sponsored research awards. As dean of the Look College and holder of the Harold J. Haynes Dean’s Chair in Engineering, she leads one of the largest engineering schools in the country, with more than 16,700 students and more than 500 faculty. Dr. Banks was previously the Bowen Engineering Head for the School of Civil Engineering at Purdue University and holder of the Jack and Kay Hockema Professorship. She received her B.S.E. from the University of Florida, M.S.E. from the University of North Carolina, and Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from Duke University. Dr. Banks is a member of the NAE and a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). She has received numerous awards, including the ASCE Petersen Outstanding Woman of the Year Award, ASCE Rudolph Hering Medal, Kate Gleason Medal, a Sloan Foundation Mentoring Fellowship, and a American Association of University Women Fellowship.

CHERYL R. BLANCHARD is the chief executive officer and a member of the board of directors of MicroCHIPS, Inc. Dr. Blanchard has extensive experience in the medical device and biologics sectors.

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×

From 2002 to 2014, she served in roles of increasing responsibility at Zimmer, Inc., a medical device company focused on musculoskeletal products. Her roles at Zimmer included leadership of research and development (R&D), clinical, quality and regulatory affairs, and health economics. She was also a member of Zimmer’s executive committee and developed and led the biologics business at Zimmer through disciplined execution of an R&D pipeline, coupled with significant partnering and business development activities. Previous to Zimmer, Dr. Blanchard built and led the medical device practice at Southwest Research Institute while also serving as an adjunct professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center, both in San Antonio, Texas. She has a B.S in ceramic engineering from Alfred University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from the University of Texas, Austin.

ROBERT D. BRAUN is the David and Andrew Lewis Professor of Space Technology at the Georgia Institute of Technology and has more than 25 years of experience in performing design and analysis of planetary exploration systems as a member of the technical staff of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research has focused on systems’ aspects of planetary exploration, where he contributed to the design, development, test, and operation of several robotic space flight systems. He has been an active participant in the development of advanced methods for multidisciplinary design and optimization. Dr. Braun developed the Collaborative Optimization architecture while at Stanford University from 1991 to 1996. This architecture was shown to have significant computational and operational benefits in the optimization of large, distributed design problems. Since completing the initial research in this area, several university and industry groups have applied this technique in solving a diverse set of engineering challenges. From 2000 to 2001, he led and integrated NASA’s advanced engineering environment development program. Dr. Braun received a B.S. in aerospace engineering from Pennsylvania State University in 1987, M.S. in astronautics from the George Washington University in 1989, and Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University in 1996. He has received the inaugural American Astronautical Society Space Technology Award (2014), the 2012 Alvin Seiff Memorial Award, the 2011 AIAA von Karman Astronautics Award, the 1999 AIAA Lawrence Sperry Award, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, two NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals, two NASA Inventions and Contributions Team Awards, and nine NASA Group Achievement Awards. He is a member of the NAE, vice chair of the Academies’ Space Studies Board, editor-in-chief of the AIAA Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, an AIAA fellow, and the author or co-author of more than 275 technical publications in the fields of atmospheric flight dynamics, planetary exploration, multidisciplinary design optimization, and systems engineering. He presently serves on advisory boards for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Space Systems Sector of the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, and the Planetary Society.

ANDREAS CANGELLARIS is the dean of the College of Engineering and the M.E. Van Valkenburg Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Professor Cangellaris received his B.S. in electrical engineering from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, in 1981, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1983 and 1985, respectively. Following a 2-year tenure as a senior staff engineer with the Electronics Engineering Department of General Motors Research Labs, he joined the faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Arizona in Tucson, in 1987. In 1997, he joined the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, as a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He served as head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering from 2009 until 2013. He was appointed dean of the College of Engineering in 2013.

CURTIS R. CARLSON, founder and CEO of Practice of Innovation, was president and CEO of SRI International from 1998 to 2014 and is a prominent technologist. He has helped create more than two dozen new companies, including Siri, which was bought by Apple and is now on the iPhone. The value creation process he developed, Innovation for Impact, is used world-wide, including by companies, universities, and government agencies in the United States, Sweden, Finland, Chile, Singapore, Japan,

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
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Denmark, Brazil, and Taiwan. A physics graduate of Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and a Ph.D. graduate in geophysical fluid dynamics from Rutgers University, he worked at RCA, GE, and then the Sarnoff Corporation. While at Sarnoff, Dr. Carlson led teams that developed the U.S. HDTV standard and a system to assess broadcast digital-video image quality, both of which were awarded engineering Emmy awards. He is fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. He received Suffolk University’s first Global Leadership in Innovation and Collaboration Award. He was honored with the Medal of Excellence Award by Rutgers University’s School of Engineering and the Dr. Robert H. Goddard Award from WPI for his professional achievements. For his role in advancing the performance and image quality of information displays, he received the Society for Information Display’s Otto H. Schade Award. He has received four honorary doctor awards, including from the Malaysian Technical University. He was a member of President Obama’s National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Taiwan’s scientific advisory board, and the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. Currently, he is a member of the scientific advisory board for the Singapore National Research Foundation, the advisory council for NSF, and a trustee at WPI. With William Wilmot, he wrote the BusinessWeek Top-10 book, Innovation: The Five Disciplines for Creating What Customers Want.

JEAN-LOU CHAMEAU took office as president of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia on July 1, 2013. Dr. Chameau is president emeritus of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), which he led for 7 years prior to joining KAUST. After receiving his engineering degree in France at the École Nationale Supérieure des Arts et Métiers and earning his Ph.D. in civil engineering from Stanford University, he had a distinguished career as a professor and administrator at Purdue University and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech). He then served as president of Golder Associates, a geotechnical consulting company, before returning to Georgia Tech as Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar and vice provost for research. He became dean of its college of engineering, the largest in the United States, and then provost and vice president for academic affairs. He has served on a number of public and industry boards, including the Council on Competitiveness, John Wiley & Sons, MTS, Safran, and the Academic Research Council of Singapore. Chameau has received numerous awards for his research and contributions as an educator and academic leader. These include an NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, the Arthur Casagrande Award from the ASCE, the Rodney Chipp Memorial Award from the Society of Women Engineers, the Prix Nessim Habif from the École Nationale Supérieure d’Arts et Métiers, and the Benjamin Garver Lamme Award from the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). In his native France, Dr. Chameau was elected Chevalier de la Légion d’ Honneur. He is a member of both the French Académie des Technologies and the U.S. NAE.

DEAN CHANG teaches design thinking and lean startup to students and researchers to cultivate the innovator and entrepreneurial mindset inside. He is the University of Maryland’s associate vice president for innovation and entrepreneurship, reporting to the president and provost and tasked with engaging every student in all 12 colleges in innovation. He is also a principal investigator (PI) and instructor in NSF’s I-Corps Node program. Prior to the University of Maryland, Dr. Chang spent 15 years in Silicon Valley where he served as the chief technology officer and vice president at Gaming Business of Immersion Corporation. He joined Immersion as employee number 4 and helped transform the venture-backed Stanford University robotics laboratory spinout into a publicly traded licensor of haptics technology embedded in products from Microsoft, Apple, BMW, Samsung, and Electronic Arts. Dr. Chang holds more than 40 patents, a B.S. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University, and an M.B.A. from the Wharton School.

JIM C.I. CHANG is currently a visiting chair professor at National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan. Prior to this, he was an adjunct professor in the Department of Electric and Computer Engineering at North Carolina State University. He received his Ph.D. in theoretical and applied mechanics from Cornell University. He retired as chief scientist of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL).

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
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Prior to joining ARL in 1998, Dr. Chang served as director of the Aerospace and Materials Science Directorate of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, chief scientist of the Naval Air Systems Command, manager of advanced materials, structures and space systems at NASA, and branch head of the structural integrity branch of the Naval Research Laboratory.

FRANCE A. CÓRDOVA is the 14th director of NSF, the only government agency charged with advancing all fields of scientific discovery, technological innovation, and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. NSF is a $7.5-billion independent federal agency with a mission that is vital to supporting our nation’s economy, security, and ability to remain a global leader. Dr. Córdova is president emerita of Purdue University, where she served as president from 2007 to 2012. Prior to her tenure at Purdue, she was chancellor of the University of California, Riverside, and vice chancellor for research at the University of California, Santa Barbara. From 1993 to 1996, she was chief scientist at NASA. She is a recipient of NASA’s highest honor, the Distinguished Service Medal. Dr. Córdova has been a professor of physics and astronomy at University of California, Riverside, University of California, Santa Barbara, and the Pennsylvania State University. She was deputy group leader in the Earth and space sciences division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Her scientific contributions are in the areas of observational and experimental astrophysics, multispectral research on X-ray and gamma-ray sources and space-borne instrumentation. More recently, Dr. Córdova served as chair of the board of regents of the Smithsonian Institution and on the board of trustees of Mayo Clinic. She also served as a member of the National Science Board (NSB). As NSF director, she is an ex officio member of the NSB. Dr. Córdova has a B.A. from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in physics from Caltech. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Association for Women in Science, a National Associate of the National Academies, and has been awarded many honorary doctorates.

MARTHA N. CYR is the director of K-12 Outreach at WPI and is a nationally recognized authority on K-12 educational outreach. Dr. Cyr joined WPI in 2003 after serving as director of the Center for Engineering Educational Outreach at Tufts University, where she had also taught engineering for 9 years. She received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of New Hampshire and an M.S. and Ph.D. in the field from WPI. She also worked as a thermal engineer for Data General Corporation and held a NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program fellowship for 3 years working on computational thermal fluids research on the impact of liquid pooling on the energy transfer within a heat pipe in microgravity. At WPI, Dr. Cyr oversees one of the nation’s largest and most comprehensive university-based K-12 STEM outreach programs, which includes programs targeted at students in elementary, middle, and secondary schools; programs that seek to engage girls and students from underrepresented minorities in STEM disciplines; and programs that provide training and classroom resources for teachers. Working with researchers at other universities under a $1 million award from the NSF National Digital Library Program, Dr. Cyr helped develop TeachEngineering, an extensive online resource for K-12 educators who teach engineering. At Tufts, she was also PI on a $1.5 million NSF award that funded the Tufts Engineering the Next Steps Project and a $1.75 million award from the NSF Teacher Enhancement Program for a pre-college engineering project for teachers.

MONICA OLVERA DE LA CRUZ is the Lawyer Taylor Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, professor of chemistry, professor of chemical and biological engineering, and professor of physics and astronomy at Northwestern University; director of the Center for Computation and Theory of Soft Materials; and co-director of the Center for Bio-Inspired Energy Science. Dr. de la Cruz obtained her B.A. in physics from the UNAM, Mexico, in 1981, and her Ph.D. in physics from Cambridge University, U.K., in 1985. She was a guest scientist (1985-1986) in the National Institute of Standards and Technology. She joined Northwestern University in 1986. From 2006 to 2013 she directed the Materials Research Center at Northwestern. From 1995 to 1997 she was a staff scientist in the Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique, Saclay, France, where she also held visiting scientist positions in 1993 and in 2003. She has developed theoretical models to determine the thermodynamics, statistics, and dynamics of

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
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macromolecules in complex environments including multicomponent solutions of heterogeneous synthetic and biological molecules, and molecular electrolytes.

FREDERIC FARINA is Caltech’s chief innovation and corporate partnerships officer. His responsibilities include commercializing inventions made at Caltech and the JPL/NASA through the creation of new startup ventures and partnerships with established companies. His office is responsible for evaluating inventions, supervising patent prosecution, and portfolio management, negotiating licensing deals with industry, assisting Caltech/JPL entrepreneurs with the creation of new startup companies, and establishing research collaborations with industry. Prior to joining the office, Mr. Farina worked as a research engineer in the GPS field at JPL and the University of Miami. He subsequently joined a law firm where he prosecuted patent applications on various technologies before the U.S. and European patent offices. Mr. Farina holds a “diplôme d’ingénieur” in electrical engineering from the Institut National des Sciences Appliquees, Lyon, France, and is a graduate of Caltech from which he received a master’s degree in electrical engineering in 1992. He is a registered patent agent with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

MIKE GREGORY is head of the Manufacturing and Management Division of the University Engineering Department and of the Institute for Manufacturing (IfM). Following an early career in industry, he was the founder member of the team which established the Manufacturing Engineering Tripos, a senior undergraduate programme covering, marketing, design, production, distribution, and service with very close industrial engagement. Subsequent developments in research and collaboration with industry reflected this broad view of manufacturing and led to the establishment of the IfM in 1998. Linking science, engineering, management, and economics and integrating education, research, and practice, the IfM now has more than 230 staff and research students and a further 100 undergraduate and masters students. Mr. Gregory’s work continues to be closely linked with industry and government, and he has published in the areas of manufacturing strategy, technology management, international manufacturing, and manufacturing policy. External activities have included membership of various government and institutional committees. He served as executive director of the Cambridge MIT Institute from 2005 to 2008 and was a Springer Visiting Professor at University of California, Berkeley, in 2008 and 2009. He chairs the U.K. Manufacturing Professors Forum and is a member of the U.K. government’s Manufacturing Analytical Group on Manufacturing. He is a fellow of Churchill College Cambridge.

WILLIAM HARRIS is the president and CEO of Science Foundation Arizona (SFAz). Prior to joining SFAz, Dr. Harris was in Ireland serving as director general of Science Foundation Ireland (SFI), a new Irish agency that helped facilitate tremendous growth in Ireland’s R&D sector during his tenure. Immediately prior to going to Ireland, Dr. Harris was vice president of research and professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of South Carolina (USC). There, he oversaw research activities throughout the USC system, several interdisciplinary centers and institutes, the USC Research Foundation and sponsored research programs. Dr. Harris served at the U.S. NSF from 1978 to 1996, including as the director for mathematical and physical sciences (1991-1996). He was responsible for federal grants appropriation of $750 million. He also established 25 science and technology centers to support investigative, interdisciplinary research by multi-university consortia. Earlier in his career, he catalyzed the Research Experience for Undergraduates program in the chemistry division and it became an NSF-wide activity. In 2005, Dr. Harris was elected a member of the Irish Royal Academy and received the Wiley Lifetime Achievement Award from California Polytechnic State University. He has authored more than 50 research papers and review articles in spectroscopy and is a fellow of the AAAS. Dr. Harris earned his undergraduate degree at the College of William and Mary and received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of South Carolina.

ORIN HERSKOWITZ is vice president of intellectual property and tech transfer at Columbia University. In addition to his role as vice president, Mr. Herskowitz serves as executive director of Columbia Technology Ventures, which manages more than 350 invention disclosures emerging from Columbia’s

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
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research laboratories each year, leading to more than 100 license deals and more than 20 new startups annually. Mr. Herskowitz has served on boards or as the PI for several innovation and entrepreneurship-focused initiatives, including the NYC Media Lab, PowerBridgeNY, and the Columbia Coulter Translational Partnership. Prior to joining Columbia, he spent 7 years with the Boston Consulting Group’s New York office.

JOHN P. HOLDREN is Assistant to the President for Science and Technology, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and co-chair of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST). Prior to joining the Obama administration, Dr. Holdren was the Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy and director of the Program on Science, Technology, and Public Policy at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, as well as a professor in Harvard’s Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and director of the independent, nonprofit Woods Hole Research Center. Previously, he was on the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, where he co-founded in 1973 and co-led until 1996 the interdisciplinary graduate-degree program in energy and resources. During the Clinton administration Dr. Holdren served as a member of PCAST through both terms and in that capacity chaired studies requested by President Clinton on preventing theft of nuclear materials, disposition of surplus weapon plutonium, the prospects of fusion energy, U.S. energy R&D strategy, and international cooperation on energy-technology innovation. Dr. Holdren holds advanced degrees in aerospace engineering and theoretical plasma physics from MIT and Stanford University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the NAE, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as a foreign member of the Royal Society of London and former president of the AAAS. He served as a member of the MacArthur Foundation’s board of trustees from 1991 to 2005, as chair of the Academies’ Committee on International Security and Arms Control from 1994 to 2005 and as co-chair of the independent, bipartisan National Commission on Energy Policy from 2002 to 2009. His awards include a MacArthur Foundation Prize Fellowship, the John Heinz Prize in Public Policy, the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, and the Volvo Environment Prize. In December 1995, he gave the acceptance lecture for the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, an international organization of scientists and public figures in which he held leadership positions from 1982 to 1997.

ARVIND KRISHNA is senior vice president and director, IBM Research. In this role, he helps guide the company’s overall technical strategy, leading a global organization of approximately 3,000 scientists and technologists located at 12 laboratories on six continents. Dr. Krishna was most recently general manager of IBM Systems and Technology Group’s Development and Manufacturing organization, responsible for the advanced engineering and development of a full technology portfolio, ranging from advanced semiconductor materials to leading-edge microprocessors, servers, and storage systems. He was previously general manager of IBM Information Management, which included database, information integration, and big data software solutions. Prior to that, he was vice president of strategy for IBM Software. He has held several key technical roles in IBM Software and IBM Research, where he pioneered IBM’s security software business. Arvind has an undergraduate degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

FRED C. LEE is currently a university distinguished professor and founder and director of the NSF ERC for Power Electronics Systems (CPES), a preeminent academic center in power electronics research at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech). He is a member of the NAE, an academician of Academia Sinica, and a foreign member of the Chinese Academic of Engineering. As CPES director, Dr. Lee leads a program encompassing research, technology development, educational outreach, industry collaboration, and technology transfer. CPES focuses its research to meet industry needs and allows industry to profit from the center’s research and outputs. The CPES program enables its principal industry members to sponsor graduate fellowships and provides the opportunity to direct research in areas of mutual interest, as well as the ability to access intellectual property generated

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×

collectively by all industry-funded fellowships on a royalty-free and non-exclusive basis. To date, more than 150 companies worldwide have benefited from this industry partnership program. The center has been cited by NSF as a model ERC for its industry collaboration and technology transfer, education, and outreach programs. Dr. Lee has served as major advisor to 83 M.S. and 76 Ph.D. students. He holds 74 U.S. patents and has published 270 journal articles and more than 660 refereed technical papers. His research interests include high-frequency power conversion, magnetics and EMI, distributed power systems, renewable energy, power quality, high-density electronics packaging, and integration, and modeling and control.

RICHARD K. MILLER was appointed president and first employee of Olin College of Engineering in 1999. He served as dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Iowa from 1992 to 1999. The previous 17 years were spent on the engineering faculty at USC in Los Angeles and University of California, Santa Barbara. With a background in applied mechanics and current interests in innovation in higher education, Dr. Miller is the author of more than 100 reviewed journal articles and other technical publications. Together with two Olin colleagues, he received the 2013 Bernard M. Gordon Prize from the U.S. NAE for innovation in engineering and technology education. A member of both the NAE and the National Academy of Inventors, he received the Marlowe Award for creative and distinguished administrative leadership from the ASEE in 2011. Dr. Miller served as chair of the Engineering Advisory Committee of the U.S. NSF and has served on advisory boards and committees for Harvard University, Stanford University, the NAE, and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in addition to others. Furthermore, he has served as a consultant to the World Bank in the establishment of new universities. A frequent speaker on engineering education, he received the 2002 Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award from the University of California, Davis, where he earned his B.S. He earned his M.S. from MIT and Ph.D. from Caltech, where he received the 2014 Caltech Distinguished Alumni Award.

PHILIP M. NECHES is the founder of Teradata Corporation. Dr. Neches served as the chief technology officer at idealab! in 1999. He served as a vice president and chief technology officer at Multimedia Products and Services Group, AT&T Corporation, from 1994 to 1996, senior vice president and chief scientist at NCR Corporation from 1989 to 1994, and led both the repositioning of their computer product family and the product plan for a merger at AT&T. He founded Teradata in 1979, where he served as vice president and chief scientist from 1979 to 1988. Dr. Neches began his career as a manager of Systems Evaluation Group at Transaction Technology, Inc., where he led analysis of consumer banking networks, including the first large-scale deployment of automated teller machines in the United States. He has been an independent consultant and advisor at a number of public and private information technology companies since 1996. He serves on the advisory boards of Foundation Ventures, LLC (chairman), Evolution Venture Partners, LLC, Tizor Systems, Inc., Simulmedia, Inc., EarthLink, TACODA, LLC, Luxtera, Inc., and the Technology Group of Merrill Lynch. Dr. Neches serves on the board of directors of PeopleLink, Inc.; he also serves on Caltech’s board of trustees, sits on its audit, investment, business and finance, development, JPL, and executive committees, and chairs the Technology Transfer Committee. He has been a director of International Meta Systems, Inc., since 1996 and served as a director of Expand Beyond Corporation, Vendquest, Inc., Evolving Systems, Inc., International Rectifier Corporation DemoGraFx, and MediaMap. He is one of America’s leading technologists and has more than 30 years of leadership in the field. Dr. Neches received his formal training at Caltech, where he completed his B.S. degree with honors in 1973, M.S. in engineering science in 1977, and Ph.D. in computer science in 1983.

EOIN O’SULLIVAN is the director of the Center for Science, Technology and Innovation Policy in the Engineering Department of Cambridge University, U.K. Dr O’Sullivan’s research interests include comparative analysis of national innovation systems, intermediate R&D institutes, university-industry partnership models, and emerging technology foresight methodologies. He works closely with a range of U.K. research and innovation agencies and policy makers. Recent policy work has included projects for the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills, the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
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Council; the Higher Education Funding Council, Innovate UK, and the British Standards Institute. He has also been a consultant and programme reviewer for research foundations and economic development agencies in a number of countries. From late 2006 through 2007, Dr. O’Sullivan was a research programmes director at the Cambridge-MIT Institute. Before that he was special advisor to the director general at Science Foundation Ireland, where he also led the Centers for Science, Engineering and Technology program. He was also a senior policy advisor at Forfás, the Irish Government’s National Policy Board for Enterprise, Trade, Science, Technology and Innovation. Dr. O’Sullivan has a D.Phil. from the Physics Department of Oxford University.

DAVID PAREKH is a fellow of the AIAA and a member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering. He serves on the board of the Connecticut Technology Council, the executive board of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Energy Efficient Buildings Hub and the advisory board of the Georgia Tech College of Engineering. He is a member of the Academies’ Aeronautics Research and Technology Roundtable and previously served on the Defense Science Board’s Task Force on DOD Energy Strategy. He earned a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering, master’s degrees in mechanical and electrical engineering from Stanford University and a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Virginia Tech.

DARRYLL J. PINES is dean and Nariman Farvardin Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the Clark School since 2009. He first arrived at the Clark School in 1995 as an assistant professor and then served as chair of the Department of Aerospace Engineering from 2006 to 2009. During a leave of absence from the university (2003-2006), Dr. Pines served as program manager for the Tactical Technology Office and Defense Sciences Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). While at DARPA, he initiated five new programs primarily related to the development of aerospace technologies, for which he received a Distinguished Service Medal. He also held positions at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Chevron Corporation, and Space Tethers, Inc. At LLNL, Dr. Pines worked on the Clementine Spacecraft program, which discovered water near the south pole of the Moon. A replica of the spacecraft now sits in the National Air and Space Museum. Dr. Pines received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He earned M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from MIT.

RICHARD F. RASHID is chief research officer at Microsoft Research, which he founded in 1991, and between 1991 and 2013, he oversaw the worldwide operations for Microsoft Research, an organization that grew to encompass more than 850 researchers across nearly a dozen laboratories worldwide. His teams collaborated with the world’s foremost researchers in academia, industry, and government on initiatives to expand the state of the art across the breadth of computing and to help ensure the future of Microsoft’s products. During his time at Microsoft, Dr. Rashid has held the positions of director, vice president, senior vice president, and chief research officer. He is currently chief technology officer of Microsoft’s Applications and Services Division. He was presented with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Emanuel R. Piore Award in 2008 and inducted into the NAE in 2003. He was also inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and received the SIGOPS Hall of Fame Award in 2008. In 2009, Dr. Rashid was given the Microsoft Technical Recognition Award for exceptional career achievements and was inducted into the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2014. He is a past member of the NSF Computer Directorate Advisory Committee, the DARPA UNIX Steering Committee, and the Computer Science Network Executive Committee. He is a trustee for the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology, as well as a former chair of the Association for Computing Machinery Software System Awards Committee. Dr. Rashid received master of science (1977) and doctoral (1980) degrees in computer science from the University of Rochester. He graduated with honors in mathematics and comparative literature from Stanford University in 1974.

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×

S. SHANKAR SASTRY is currently the dean of engineering at University of California, Berkeley, and the faculty director of the Blum Center for Developing Economies. From 2004 to 2007, Dr. Sastry was the director of the Center for Information Technology in the Interests of Society (CITRIS), an interdisciplinary center spanning the University of California in Berkeley, Davis, Merced, and Santa Cruz. He has served as chair, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, from January 2001 through June 2004. From 1999 to early 2001, he was on leave from Berkeley as director of the Information Technology Office at DARPA. From 1996 to 1999, he was the director of the Electronics Research Laboratory at Berkeley. Dr. Sastry received his Ph.D. degree in 1981 from the University of California, Berkeley. He was on the faculty of MIT as an assistant professor from 1980 to 1982 and at Harvard University as a chaired Gordon Mc Kay Professor in 1994. His areas of personal research are resilient network control systems, cybersecurity, autonomous and unmanned systems (especially aerial vehicles), computer vision, nonlinear and adaptive control, control of hybrid and embedded systems, and software. Most recently, he has been concerned with critical infrastructure protection, in the context of establishing a 10-year NSF Science and Technology Center Team for Research in Ubiquitous Secure Technologies. He has coauthored more than 550 technical papers and nine books. Dr. Sastry was elected into the NAE in 2001 and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2004, and a fellow of the IEEE. He also received the President of India Gold Medal in 1977, the IBM Faculty Development award for 1983-1985, the a NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1985, the Eckman Award of the of the American Automatic Control Council in 1990, the Ragazzini Award for Distinguished Accomplishments in teaching in 2005, the Distinguished Alumnus Award of the Indian Institute of Technology in 1999, and the David Marr Prize for the best paper at the International Conference in Computer Vision in 1999, and the C.L. Tien Award for Academic Leadership in 2010. Dr. Sastry earned an M.A. (honoris causa) from Harvard University in 1994 and an honorary doctorate from the Royal Swedish Institute of Technology in 2007. He has been a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (2002-2005) and the Defense Science Board (2008), among other national boards. He is currently on the corporate boards of C3-Carbon and HCL Technologies (India) and on the scientific advisory boards of Interwest, LLC, GE Software, and Eriksholm.

MAXINE L. SAVITZ is the retired general manager for Technology Partnerships at Honeywell, Inc., formerly AlliedSignal. Previously, she was the general manager of AlliedSignal Ceramics Components. Dr. Savitz was employed at DOE and its predecessor agencies (1974-1983) and served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation. She serves on the board of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy and on advisory bodies for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Sandia National Laboratories, and JPL. She serves on the MIT visiting committee for sponsored research activities. In 2009, Dr. Savitz was appointed to PCAST and served as vice president of the NAE from 2006 to 2014. She is a member of the NAE, a fellow of the California Council on Science and Technology, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Past board memberships include the National Science Board, the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, the Defense Science Board, the Electric Power Research Institute, Draper Laboratories, and the Energy Foundation. Dr. Savitz’s awards and honors include the Orton Memorial Lecturer Award (American Ceramic Society) in 1998, the DOE Outstanding Service Medal in 1981, the President’s Meritorious Rank Award in 1980, recognition by the Engineering News Record for Contribution to Construction Industry in 1979 and 1975, and the MERDC Commander Award for Scientific Excellence in 1967. She is the author of about 20 publications.

THOMAS M. SIEBEL is the chairman and CEO of C3 IoT. He was the chairman and CEO of Siebel Systems, which merged with Oracle Corporation in 2006. Founded in 1993, Siebel Systems became a leader in application software with more than 8,000 employees in 32 countries, more than 4,500 corporate customers, and annual revenue in excess of $2 billion. Mr. Siebel is also chairman of the Siebel Energy Institute, a global consortium for innovative and collaborative energy research for the public domain. Through the Thomas and Stacey Siebel Foundation, Mr. Siebel provides support for energy solutions, bioengineering and stem cell research programs, and other projects that work to improve the quality of

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×

life, environment, and education of its community members. He serves on the boards of advisors for the Stanford University College of Engineering, the University of Illinois College of Engineering, and the University of California, Berkeley, College of Engineering. Mr. Siebel is a graduate of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where he received a B.A. in history, an M.B.A, and an M.S. in computer science.

KELLY O. SULLIVAN joined PNNL in 2001 and currently works with the deputy director for science and technology to provide leadership in developing PNNL’s long-term scientific vision and strategy for distinguishing PNNL within the scientific community and enabling its researchers to advance the boundaries of both scientific and engineering achievement. Dr. Sullivan has had multiple roles at PNNL. She has led the laboratory’s science and technology investments—a more than $80 million annual investment portfolio for capability and business development—since April 2012 and has managed the Linus Pauling Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowship Program since its inception in 2009. She served as the interim director of institutional strategy from April-October 2015. Prior to coming to PNNL, she was a chemistry professor at Mankato State University in Minnesota and at Creighton University in Nebraska. Dr. Sullivan’s research interests focus on the electronic structure of small molecules and ions. She received a B.S. in chemistry from Christian Brothers College and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Texas Tech University.

EDWIN L.THOMAS is the William and Stephanie Sick Dean of the George R. Brown School of Engineering. He holds joint appointments in the Departments of Materials Science and Nanoengineering and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and collaborates with scientists and engineers in the Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology at Rice University. Dr. Thomas is a materials scientist and mechanical engineer and is passionate about promoting engineering leadership and student design competitions. His research is currently focused on using 2D and 3D lithography, direct-write, and self-assembly techniques for creating metamaterials with unprecedented mechanical and thermal properties. Dr. Thomas is the former head of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at MIT, a position he held from 2006 until his appointment at Rice in July 2011. He was named Morris Cohen Professor of Materials Science and Engineering in 1989 and is the founder and former director of the MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnology (2002-2006). Before joining MIT, Dr. Thomas founded and served as co-director of the Institute for Interface Science and was head of the Department of Polymer Science and Engineering at the University of Massachusetts. He is a recipient of the 1991 High Polymer Physics Prize of the APS and the 1985 American Chemical Society Creative Polymer Chemist award. He was elected to the NAE and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2009, and he is an inaugural fellow of the Materials Society in 2008, a fellow of the AAAS (2003), and a fellow of the APS in 1986. He wrote the undergraduate textbook The Structure of Materials and has coauthored more than 420 papers and holds 16 patents. Dr. Thomas received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts and his Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Cornell University.

DAVID R. WALT is a university professor, the Robinson Professor of Chemistry, a professor of biomedical engineering, a professor of genetics, and a professor of oral medicine at Tufts University and is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute professor. Dr. Walt is the founding scientist of Illumina, Inc., and has been a director and chairman of its scientific advisory board since 1998. He is also the founding scientist of Quanterix Corporation and is a director and chairman of its scientific advisory board since 2007. Dr. Walt has received numerous national and international awards and honors for his fundamental and applied work in the field of optical sensors, arrays, and single molecule detection. He is a co-chair of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology of the Academies. Dr. Walt is a member of the NAE, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, and a fellow of the AAAS.

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×

KARAN L. WATSON is provost and executive vice president of Texas A&M University. Dr. Watson had served in the interim position since July 2009. She previously served as vice provost at Texas A&M from December 2008 to July 2009 and as dean of faculties and associate provost from February 2002 to December 2008. She joined the faculty of Texas A&M in 1983 and is currently a Regents Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. Before assuming the position of dean of faculties and associate provost, Dr. Watson served as the associate dean for graduate studies in the Dwight Look College of Engineering. She also served the Look College as associate dean for academic affairs and as a member of the faculty senate. She was interim vice president and associate provost for diversity from November 2005 to September 2006, a role that she again held from December 2008 until July 2009. Dr. Watson is a fellow of the IEEE and the ASEE. Her awards and recognitions include the U.S. President’s Award for Mentoring Minorities and Women in Science and Technology, the AAAS mentoring award, the IEEE International Undergraduate Teaching Award, the College of Engineering Crawford Teaching Award, and two university-level Distinguished Achievement Awards from the Texas A&M University Association of Former Students—one in student relations in 1992 and one in administration in 2010. Dr. Watson has chaired the graduate committees of 34 doctoral students and more than 60 master’s degree students. In 2003 to 2004, she served as a senior fellow of the NAE Center for the Advancement of Scholarship in Engineering Education. Since 1991, she has served as an accreditation evaluator and commissioner and is now on the board of directors for ABET, Inc., formerly the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. She served as ABET president for 2012 to 2013.

YANNIS YORTSOS has served as dean of the USC Viterbi School of Engineering since 2005. He is the Chester F. Dolley Professor of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering and holds the Zohrab A. Kaprielian Dean’s Chair in Engineering. Dr. Yortsos is well known for his work on fluid flow, transport, and reaction processes in porous and fractured media with applications to the recovery of subsurface fluids and soil remediation. He has been actively involved in the peer review of the Yucca Mountain Project for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The recipient of many honors for research, teaching, and service, Dr. Yortsos is a member of the NAE and serves as the liaison of Section 11 to the Academies. He received his B.Sc. from the National Technical University, Athens, Greece, and his M.Sc. and Ph.D. from Caltech, all in chemical engineering. An invited scholar at several institutions in the United States and abroad, Dr. Yortsos joined the faculty of USC in 1978. He is an associate member of the Academy of Athens and is the recipient of the Ellis Island Medal of Honor. He currently serves on the executive committee of the Engineering Deans Council as well as the executive committee of the Global Engineering Deans Council.

Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×
Page 35
Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×
Page 36
Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×
Page 38
Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×
Page 39
Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×
Page 40
Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×
Page 41
Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×
Page 42
Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×
Page 43
Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×
Page 44
Suggested Citation:"B Biographical Sketches of Symposium Speakers and Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23645.
×
Page 45
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A Vision for the Future of Center-Based Multidisciplinary Engineering Research: Proceedings of a Symposium Get This Book
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Out of concern for the state of engineering in the United States, the National Science Foundation (NSF) created the Engineering Research Centers (ERCs) with the goal of improving engineering research and education and helping to keep the United States competitive in global markets. Since the ERC program’s inception in 1985, NSF has funded 67 ERCs across the United States. NSF funds each ERC for up to 10 years, during which time the centers build robust partnerships with industry, universities, and other government entities that can ideally sustain them upon graduation from NSF support.

To ensure that the ERCs continue to be a source of innovation, economic development, and educational excellence, NSF commissioned the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to convene a 1-day symposium in April 2016. This event featured four plenary panel presentations on: the evolving global context for center-based engineering research, trends in undergraduate and graduate engineering education, new directions in university-industry interaction, and emerging best practices in translating university research into innovation. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the symposium.

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