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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Multimodal Therapies for Brain Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23657.
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A

References

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Multimodal Therapies for Brain Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23657.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Multimodal Therapies for Brain Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23657.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Multimodal Therapies for Brain Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23657.
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Luber, B., L. H. Kinnunen, B. C. Rakitin, R. Ellsasser, Y. Stern, and S. H. Lisanby. 2007. Facilitation of performance in a working memory task with rTMS stimulation of the precuneus: Frequency- and time-dependent effects. Brain Research 1128(1):120-129.

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Multimodal Therapies for Brain Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23657.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Multimodal Therapies for Brain Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23657.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Multimodal Therapies for Brain Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23657.
×
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Multimodal Therapies for Brain Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23657.
×
Page 62
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Multimodal Therapies for Brain Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23657.
×
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Multimodal Therapies for Brain Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23657.
×
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Multimodal Therapies for Brain Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23657.
×
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Multimodal Therapies for Brain Disorders: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23657.
×
Page 66
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Multimodal therapy approaches that combine interventions aimed at different aspects of disease are emerging as potential—and perhaps essential—ways to enhance clinical outcomes for patients with psychiatric and neurological disorders. In order to examine the general principles underlying multimodal therapies and to explore challenges, potential barriers, and opportunities for their development, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop in June 2016. Participants explored scientific, clinical, regulatory, and reimbursement issues related to multimodal approaches and potential opportunities to enhance clinical outcomes for individuals with nervous system disorders. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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