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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Finding a Path to Safety in Food Allergy: Assessment of the Global Burden, Causes, Prevention, Management, and Public Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23658.
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Appendix D

Acronyms and Abbreviations

AAAAI

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

AAFA

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America

AAP

American Academy of Pediatrics

ACAA

Air Carrier Access Act

ACAAI

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

ACD

allergic contact dermatitis

ACP

allergen control plan

AD

atopic dermatitis

ADA

American Diabetes Association

ADA

Americans with Disabilities Act

aOR

adjusted odds ratio

AP

allergenic proctocolitis

APC

antigen-presenting cell

APT

atopy patch test

ASCIA

Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

BAT

basophil activation test

BEAT

Beating Egg Allergy Trial

CAC

Codex Alimentarius Commission

CCP

critical control point

CD14

cluster of differentiation 14

CDC

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CI

confidence interval

CPSC

Consumer Product Safety Commission

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Finding a Path to Safety in Food Allergy: Assessment of the Global Burden, Causes, Prevention, Management, and Public Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23658.
×
CRD

component resolved diagnostics

DBPCOFC

double-blind, placebo-controlled oral food challenge

DC

dendritic cell

DMP

differentially methylated probe

DOJ

U.S. Department of Justice

DOT

U.S. Department of Transportation

EAACI

European Academy of Allergy & Clinical Immunology

EAT

Enquiring About Tolerance

ECHO

Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes

ED

eliciting dose

EFSA

European Food Safety Authority

EG

eosinophilic gastroenteritis

EHF

extensively hydrolyzed cow’s milk formula

ELISA

enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

EoE

eosinophilic esophagitis

EPIT

epicutaneous immunotherapy

ESPGHAN

European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

EU

European Union

EWAS

epigenome-wide association study

FAA

Federal Aviation Administration

FALCPA

Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act

FAMPP

Food Allergy Management and Prevention Plans

FAO

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

FDA

Food and Drug Administration

FDEIA

food-dependent, exercise-induced allergy

FNS

U.S. Food and Nutrition Service

FPIES

food protein–induced enterocolitis syndrome

FSIS

Food Safety and Inspection Service

FSMA

Food Safety Modernization Act

GI

gastrointestinal

GINI

German Infant Nutritional Intervention

GWAS

genome-wide association study

GxE

genome–environment

HACCP

hazard analysis and critical control point

HEAP

Hen’s Egg Allergy Prevention

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Finding a Path to Safety in Food Allergy: Assessment of the Global Burden, Causes, Prevention, Management, and Public Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23658.
×
HHS

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

HLA

human leucocyte antigen

HRQL

health-related quality of life

ICD

International Classification of Diseases

ICN

Institute of Child Nutrition

ICSA

interval censoring survival analysis

IDEA

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

IEP

individualized education program

IFN

interferon

IgE

immunoglobulin E

ILSI-EU

International Life Sciences Institute-Europe

IOM

Institute of Medicine

ITP

Interstate Travel Program

JCAAI

Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

LEAP

Learning Early About Peanut Allergy

LOAEL

lowest-observed-adverse-effect level

MAPK

mitogen-activated protein kinase

MED

minimal eliciting done

Mis-BAIR

Melbourne Infant Study-BCG for Allergy and Infection Reduction

MMR

measles, mumps, rubella

NAS

National Academy of Sciences

NCHS

National Center for Health Statistics

NEISS

National Electronic Injury Surveillance System

NHAMCS

National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

NHANES

National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

NHDS

National Hospital Discharge Survey

NHMRC

National Health and Medical Research Council

NIAID

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

NIH

National Institutes of Health

NOAEL

no-observed-adverse-effect level

NRC

National Research Council

NSAID

nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug

OFC

oral food challenge

OIT

oral immunotherapy

OR

odds ratio

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Finding a Path to Safety in Food Allergy: Assessment of the Global Burden, Causes, Prevention, Management, and Public Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23658.
×
PAL

precautionary allergen labeling

PASTURE

Protection against Allergy Study in Rural Environments

PCR

polymerase chain reaction

PFAS

pollen-associated food allergy syndrome

PHF

partially hydrolyzed formula

PIFA

Prevalence of Infant Food Allergy; Pertussis Immunisation and Food Allergy

PreventADALL

Preventing Atopic Dermatitis and Allergies in Children

PRISMA

Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses

RAST

radioallergosorbent test

RCT

randomized controlled trial

RFR

Reportable Food Registry

RR

relative risk

sIgE

allergen-specific IgE (or food-specific IgE)

SLIT

sublingual immunotherapy

SNP

single nucleotide polymorphism

SOP

standard operating procedure

SPT

skin prick test

STEP

Starting Time for Egg Protein

SyMBIOTA

Synergy in Microbiota

TNO

Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research

TTB

U.S. Tax and Trade Bureau

TWG

Threshold Working Group

USDA

U.S. Department of Agriculture

VDR

vitamin D receptor

VITAL®

Voluntary Incidental Trace Allergen Labeling

WAO

World Allergy Organization

WHO

World Health Organization

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Finding a Path to Safety in Food Allergy: Assessment of the Global Burden, Causes, Prevention, Management, and Public Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23658.
×
Page 541
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Finding a Path to Safety in Food Allergy: Assessment of the Global Burden, Causes, Prevention, Management, and Public Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23658.
×
Page 542
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Finding a Path to Safety in Food Allergy: Assessment of the Global Burden, Causes, Prevention, Management, and Public Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23658.
×
Page 543
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Finding a Path to Safety in Food Allergy: Assessment of the Global Burden, Causes, Prevention, Management, and Public Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23658.
×
Page 544
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Over the past 20 years, public concerns have grown in response to the apparent rising prevalence of food allergy and related atopic conditions, such as eczema. Although evidence on the true prevalence of food allergy is complicated by insufficient or inconsistent data and studies with variable methodologies, many health care experts who care for patients agree that a real increase in food allergy has occurred and that it is unlikely to be due simply to an increase in awareness and better tools for diagnosis. Many stakeholders are concerned about these increases, including the general public, policy makers, regulatory agencies, the food industry, scientists, clinicians, and especially families of children and young people suffering from food allergy.

At the present time, however, despite a mounting body of data on the prevalence, health consequences, and associated costs of food allergy, this chronic disease has not garnered the level of societal attention that it warrants. Moreover, for patients and families at risk, recommendations and guidelines have not been clear about preventing exposure or the onset of reactions or for managing this disease.

Finding a Path to Safety in Food Allergy examines critical issues related to food allergy, including the prevalence and severity of food allergy and its impact on affected individuals, families, and communities; and current understanding of food allergy as a disease, and in diagnostics, treatments, prevention, and public policy. This report seeks to: clarify the nature of the disease, its causes, and its current management; highlight gaps in knowledge; encourage the implementation of management tools at many levels and among many stakeholders; and delineate a roadmap to safety for those who have, or are at risk of developing, food allergy, as well as for others in society who are responsible for public health.

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