National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Beyond Compliance: Strengthening the Safety Culture of the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry
Page 6
Suggested Citation:"Foundations for Future Safety Efforts." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Beyond Compliance: Strengthening the Safety Culture of the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23662.
×
Page 6
Page 7
Suggested Citation:"Foundations for Future Safety Efforts." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Beyond Compliance: Strengthening the Safety Culture of the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23662.
×
Page 7

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

6 Beyond ComplianCe Foundations for Future Safety efforts In the many decades since the oil and gas industry began working along the coastline and, ultimately, moved offshore to explore for and produce oil and gas, occupational safety appears to have improved through the efforts of companies, industry associations, and regula- tors. The offshore environment did not start out as a safe one in which to work. Initial ad hoc and experimental designs for drilling from vessels and platforms in shallow water resulted in overturned vessels, fires, explosions, blowouts, and extensive loss of life in the 1950s and 1960s. Inconsisten- cies in reporting and reporting requirements make it impossible to assess accident rates during the early years as companies moved farther offshore, but a series of di- sasters during this period illustrated the risks and motivated action by industry and government. From the mid-1960s through the 1990s, the industry began to work collectively to solve design and equipment problems. Industry associations such as the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the Offshore Opera- tors Committee (OOC) advised the federal government on changes that would improve safety, developed and issued a series of recommended prac- DoD phoTo By spC 2nD Class JonaThen e. Davis D o D ph o To B y s pC 2n D C la s s Ju sTin sTu m B eR g

Strengthening the Safety Culture of the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry 7 tices and standards, and instituted changes in required training programs for offshore personnel. The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and U.S. Geologi- cal Survey (USGS) (which served as a safety regulator during this period) also began enforcing new occupational safety and other regulations to enhance safety, which expanded over time. Government regulators and industry officials did not always agree on how to address safety concerns. During the 1990s, API developed a recommended practice for safe operations (API Recommended Practice [RP] 75), which began as a voluntary standard. As the number of compa- nies following RP 75 subsequently declined, industry resisted the efforts of federal regulators to require all companies to comply with it. The three government departments currently responsible for regulat- ing the offshore industry—the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), USCG, and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT)—imple- ment safety and environmental regulations according to their capabilities and expertise. USCG regulates nearly all maritime activities, and DOT’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) regulates all pipelines onshore and some offshore. The capabilities and expertise for permitting and inspecting oil and gas wells and production (including producer pipelines) on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf reside in DOI’s Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE). In October 2010, 3 months after flow from the Macondo well was stopped, DOI (through a predecessor bureau to BSEE) published a final Safety DoD phoTo By peTTy offiCeR 3RD Class paTRiCk kelley

Next: Characteristics of a Strong Safety Culture »
Beyond Compliance: Strengthening the Safety Culture of the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Beyond Compliance: Strengthening the Safety Culture of the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry summarizes recommendations to industry and regulators to strengthen and sustain the safety culture of the offshore oil and gas industry.

The committee that prepared the report addresses conceptual challenges in defining safety culture, and discusses the empirical support for the safety culture definition offered by the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, the nine characteristics or elements of a robust safety culture, methods for assessing company safety culture, and barriers to improving safety culture in the offshore industry.

The committee’s report also identifies topics on which further research is needed with respect to assessing, improving, and sustaining safety culture. Download the full report issued in May 2016 or a Report in Brief.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!