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Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry (2017)

Chapter: Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23677.
×

Appendix F

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE

David A. Savitz, Ph.D. (Chair), is the vice president for research at Brown University. He is a professor of epidemiology in the Brown University School of Public Health, with a joint appointment in obstetrics and gynecology in the Alpert Medical School. He came to Brown in 2010 from Mount Sinai School of Medicine, where he had served as the Charles W. Bluhdorn Professor of Community and Preventive Medicine and the director of the Disease Prevention and Public Health Institute since 2006. Earlier, he taught and conducted research at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health and at the Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Dr. Savitz received his undergraduate training in psychology at Brandeis University, a master’s degree in preventive medicine at The Ohio State University, and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. His epidemiological research has addressed a wide range of public health issues including hazards in the workplace, the environmental effects of energy development, childhood obesity, pesticides and breast cancer, pregnancy health risks from environmental exposures, drinking water safety, and ethnicity and birth outcomes. Dr. Savitz has directed 30 doctoral dissertations and 15 master’s theses. He is the author of nearly 350 papers in professional journals and the editor or author of three books on environmental epidemiology. He has served as editor at the American Journal of Epidemiology and Epidemiology, and as a member of the Epidemiology and Disease Control-1 study section of the National Institutes of Health. He was President of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and the Society for Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiologic Research and North American Regional Councilor for the International Epidemiological Association. Dr. Savitz is a member of the National Academy of Medicine.

Vinícius Antão, M.D., M.Sc., Ph.D., is the director of patient registries at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, New York. Prior to this position, he was the lead in the registries team for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) where he was the principal and co-investigator of numerous research projects, including analysis of large databases from 2008 to 2015. Before this he was the senior manager for GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, where he designed and implemented epidemiological studies in many countries in Europe, Asia, and Latin America. He has received numerous awards including Excellence in Surveillance and Health Monitoring from the CDC, Director’s Award for Innovation (National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Registry) from the CDC, Occupational Health and Safety Scientific Research Award from the American Public Health Association, Excellence in Program Delivery Award (National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Registry) from the CDC, and the Collaborative

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23677.
×

Success Award (Respiratory Outbreak Working Group) from the CDC. Dr. Antão received his M.D. from Petropolis Medical School in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, his M.Sc. in respiratory medicine from Fluminense Federal University in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and his Ph.D. in respiratory medicine at Sao Paulo University.

Jane E. Clougherty, Sc.D., is an assistant professor of environmental and occupational health and the director of exposure science at the Graduate School of Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh. Before joining the faculty, she worked with the City of New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to collect and analyze year-round measures of fine particles and metals constituents, elemental carbon, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and ozone at 150 sites throughout New York City, developing predictive models to explore exposure variability across a large population. As an interdisciplinary environmental health scientist, Dr. Clougherty’s training and experience lie predominantly in air pollution exposure assessment and environmental epidemiology, but her interests also include occupational health, social epidemiology, community-based research, and toxicology. She serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology and Environmental Health Perspectives and as a reviewer for several other publications in the field of environmental health. Dr. Clougherty received her undergraduate degree in economics and environmental studies from the University of Chicago, her masters of science in geography (environmental health sciences) from McMaster University, and her Sc.D. in exposure, epidemiology, and risk program from Harvard University School of Public Health.

Montserrat Fuentes, Ph.D., became the Dean of the College of Humanities and Sciences at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, in 2016. Prior to that position, she served as the head and a professor of statistics at North Carolina State University (NCSU). She is the principal investigator and director of the Research Network for Statistical Methods for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, has authored more than 75 scientific publications, and served as principal investigator (or co-principal investigator) on more than 20 research grants. Dr. Fuentes was named an American Statistics Association Fellow (2008) for outstanding contributions to research in spatial statistics, for excellence in the development and application of statistical methodology in atmospheric sciences, air pollution and oceanography; and for service to the profession. She is the editor of the Journal of Agricultural, Biological, and Environmental Statistics of the International Biometrics Society. Dr. Fuentes is a member of the Science Advisory Board Integrated Human Exposure Committee of the Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. representative in the board of directors of the International Environmetrics Society. She was a member of the biostatistical methods and research design study section of the National Institutes for Health, and she is currently a member of the scientific review committee of Health Canada. She was also a member of a committee of the National Research Council working on the impact of ozone on mortality. Dr. Fuentes was awarded the NCSU 2013 Equity of Women award, for major contributions to the equity and well-being of women at NCSU. She received her B.S. in mathematics and music (piano) from the University of Valladolid (Spain) and her Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Chicago.

Richard (Dick) A. Kulka, Ph.D., is an independent consultant in statistical, survey and social research. He has served on the staff of four major research organizations: the Survey Research Center at the University of Michigan, the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, RTI International (formerly Research Triangle Institute), and Abt Associates Inc. (also holding senior management positions at RTI, NORC, and Abt). He has been involved in the design, conduct, and analysis of numerous statistical surveys on health, mental health, and other social policy issues for more than 30 years, while also conducting a broad range of applied research on survey research methods. Dr. Kulka has authored or co-authored numerous papers, articles, and chapters based on this work as well as three research monographs. He has also provided ongoing methodological design, analysis, oversight, and consultation on a broad range of federal statistical surveys as well as advice to several other statistical survey organizations, including the Census Bureau and ongoing longitudinal surveys conducted at the University of Michigan. Also active in several professional organizations, he is a member and fellow of the American Statistical Association (including service on the Census Advisory Committee and Committee on Privacy and Confidentiality) and a member of the American Association for Public Opinion Research since 1980, where he has served the organization in a number of capacities, including as president (2008–2009). Other activities include

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23677.
×

the board of directors for the Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics, the National Institute of Statistical Sciences, and the triennial Conferences on Health Survey Research Methods. He has also served at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on several committees and expert panels and as a report coordinator for the Committee on National Statistics, the National Research Council, and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Kulka earned his B.A. from Tulane University and M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

Frances Murphy, M.D., M.P.H., is the president and chief executive officer of Sigma Health Consulting, LLC, a woman-owned, veteran-owned small business. Dr. Murphy is a health care executive with extensive experience in managing, operating, and transforming large health care organizations. She serves as a consultant on health information technology, leadership development, health care management, neuroscience and mental health, women’s health, quality and safety, study design and research management, and veterans’ and military health. Dr. Murphy had a 20-year career working in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) at medical centers and in the VA Central Office. She served as the deputy under secretary for health (DUSH) for health policy coordination from 2002 to 2006 and as the principle DUSH from 1999 to 2002. She served in the U.S. Air Force as the staff neurologist at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, from 1983 to 1987. She is board certified in neurology and earned her M.D. at Georgetown University School of Medicine and her M.P.H. from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

Cecile S. Rose, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor of medicine in the Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at National Jewish Health (NJH). She has academic appointments in the Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Colorado and in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health in the Colorado School of Public Health. Dr. Rose has long-standing research and clinical interests in occupational and environmental lung diseases. She is the principal investigator on a collaborative research project in deployment-related lung diseases and is medical director of the clinical program in deployment lung disease at NJH. Her other research interests focus on noninfectious granulomatous lung diseases and mining-related cardiopulmonary diseases. Dr. Rose earned her B.A. from Northwestern University. She received a masters degree in public health and an M.D. from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Armistead (Ted) G. Russell, Ph.D., is the Howard T. Tellepsen Chair and Regents Professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Russell arrived at Georgia Tech in 1996, from Carnegie Mellon University, and has expertise in air quality engineering, with a particular emphasis in air quality modeling, air quality monitoring and analysis. He has been a member of a number of the National Academies committees, including chairing the Committee to Review EPA’s Mobile Model and the Committee on Carbon Monoxide Episodes in Meteorological and Topographical Problem Areas, and he served on the committee on Tropospheric Ozone Formation and Measurement, the committee on the ozone-forming potential of reformulated fuels and the committee on Risk Assessment of Hazardous Air Pollutants. Dr. Russell was a member of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee and the subcommittee on Air Quality Modelling Subcommittee of the Advisory Council on Clean Air Compliance Analysis. He was a member of the Health Effects Institute Research Review Committee, the EPA Federal Advisory Committee Act Subcommittee on Ozone, Particulate Matter and Regional Haze, the North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone, and California’s Reactivity Science Advisory Committee. Dr. Russell earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering at the California Institute of Technology. His B.S. is from Washington State University.

David H. Trump, M.D., M.P.H., M.P.A., is the former chief deputy commissioner for public health and preparedness for the Virginia Department of Health. Dr. Trump oversaw the Office of Epidemiology, Office of Drinking Water, Office of Radiological Health, Office of Emergency Services, Office of Licensure and Certification, Office of Chief Medical Examiner, Office of Emergency Preparedness, and Office of Risk Communication and Education. From March 2012 to May 2014 he was the director, Office of Epidemiology, and the state epidemiologist. The Office of Epidemiology oversees and is responsible for disease reporting, investigation, surveillance, and control programs statewide for communicable diseases; HIV and other sexually transmitted infections; vaccine preventable

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23677.
×

diseases; and waterborne, vectorborne, and zoonotic diseases in humans. From 2005 to 2012 he was the director of the Peninsula Health District, which provides public health services for the 340,000 residents of the cities of Newport News, Williamsburg, and Poquoson and the counties of York and James City in southeastern Virginia. Prior to joining the Virginia Department of Health, he completed a 24-year career as a Navy medical officer specializing in public health and preventive medicine. His career included service as officer in charge of Navy Environmental and Preventive Medicine Unit No. 7 in Naples, Italy, and senior public health leadership assignments with the Navy Surgeon General’s office and at the Pentagon. He retired at the rank of Captain from his last assignment as an associate professor of preventive medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Trump received his M.D. from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, an M.P.H. from the School of Hygiene and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University, and an M.P.A. from George Mason University. He is a fellow of the American College of Preventive Medicine and is board certified in family medicine and general preventive medicine.

Joyce S. Tsuji, Ph.D., DABT, is a board-certified toxicologist and a fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. She specializes in assessing exposure and risks associated with chemicals and in the communication of scientific issues. Dr. Tsuji has worked on projects in the United States and internationally for industry, trade associations, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies, the U.S. Department of Justice, the Australian EPA, municipalities, and private citizens. Her experience includes human health and environmental toxicology related to a wide variety of chemicals in the environment, consumer products, and medical devices. She has designed and directed dietary and environmental exposure studies and community programs involving health education and biomonitoring for populations potentially exposed to chemicals in the environment, including soil, water, and food-chain exposures. Dr. Tsuji has also assessed exposure and health risks associated with chemical exposures from air, foods, medical devices, and a variety of consumer products (e.g., cleaners, air fresheners, cosmetics, personal care products, paints and coatings, carpets, glues, wood preservatives, building materials, and children’s toys and play equipment), including those containing nanotechnology or nanomaterials. She has served on expert panels on toxicology and health risks issues for the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council (including the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology), Institute of Medicine, and federal and state agencies. Dr. Tsuji earned her B.S. in biological sciences from Stanford University and a Ph.D. focused in environmental physiology from the Department of Zoology, University of Washington.

Mark J. Utell, M.D., is a professor of medicine and environmental medicine, the director of occupational and environmental medicine, and the former director of pulmonary and critical care medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center. His research interests have centered on the effects of environmental toxicants on the human respiratory tract. Dr. Utell has published extensively on the health effects of inhaled gases, particles, and fibers in the workplace and indoor and outdoor environments. He was the co-principal investigator of an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Particulate Matter Center and chair of the Health Effects Institute’s Research Committee. He has served as chair of EPA’s Environmental Health Committee and on the executive committee of the EPA’s science advisory board. He is a former recipient of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Academic Award in Environmental and Occupational Medicine. Dr. Utell currently chairs the National Academies Committee to Review EPA’s “Science to Achieve Results” Research Grant Program. He previously served as chair of the Institute of Medicine Committee to Review the Department of Labor’s Site Exposure Matrix (SEM); as chair of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee to Review the Department of Defense Enhanced Particulate Matter Surveillance Program Report; and as chair of the NRC Committee to Review the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Respiratory Disease Research Program. He was a member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology (BEST) and the Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter. He received his M.D. from the Tufts University School of Medicine.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23677.
×

STAFF

David A. Butler, Ph.D., is a scholar in and the director of the Office of Military and Veterans Health in the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in engineering from the University of Rochester and his doctoral degree in public policy analysis from Carnegie Mellon University. Before joining the National Academies, Dr. Butler served as an analyst for the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment, was a research associate in the Department of Environmental Health of the Harvard School of Public Health, and conducted research at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He has directed several National Academies studies on military and veterans health, environmental health, and risk assessment topics, including ones that produced Research on the Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation—Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute; Future Uses of the DoD Joint Pathology Center Biorepository; Provision of Mental Health Counseling Services Under TRICARE; PTSD Compensation and Military Service; Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 1998, and Update 2000; Disposition of the Air Force Health Study; and the report series Characterizing the Exposure of Veterans to Agent Orange and Other Herbicides Used in Vietnam. Dr. Butler was also a co-editor of Systems Engineering to Improve Traumatic Brain Injury Care in the Military Health System.

Anne N. Styka, M.P.H., is a program officer in the Health and Medicine Division at the National Academies. Over her tenure she has worked on a broad range of topics related to the health of military and veteran populations, including mental health treatment offered in the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), epidemiological research using VA data, and directing a research program of fostering new research studies using data and biospecimens collected as part of the 20-year Air Force Health Study. Before coming to the Academies, Ms. Styka spent several years working as an epidemiologist for the New Mexico Department of Health and the Albuquerque Area Southwest Tribal Epidemiology Center and even spent several months in Zambia as the epidemiologist on a study of silicosis and other nonmalignant respiratory diseases among copper miners. She has several peer-reviewed publications and has contributed to numerous state and national reports. She received her B.S. in cell and tissue bioengineering from the University of Illinois at Chicago and has an M.P.H. in epidemiology from the University of Michigan. Ms. Styka was the 2015 recipient of the Institute of Medicine and National Academy of Medicine Multitasker Award and a member of the 2011 National Academies’ Distinguished Group Award.

Cary Haver, M.P.H., is a program officer in the Health and Medicine, and has worked with the Committee on Gulf War Health: Treatment of Chronic Multisymptom Illness; the Committee to Review the Department of Labor Site Exposure Matrix; and the Committee on Long-Term Health Consequences of Exposure to Burn Pits in Iraq and Afghanistan. Before joining the National Academies, Ms. Haver worked for Tetra Tech Sciences, a consulting group dedicated to a variety of environmental and occupational epidemiology and toxicology projects, including exposures to asbestos, chromium, and mercury. She earned her M.P.H. with a concentration in epidemiology from George Washington University.

Pamela Ramey-McCray is an administrative assistant in the Health and Medicine Division. She has worked to support numerous studies on military and veterans health, malaria research, and studies on U.S. veteran twins since coming to the National Academies in 1993. Ms. Ramey-McCray is a recipient of the Institute of Medicine’s 2009 Veteran Award. She earned her bachelor’s degree in human relations at Trinity Washington University in Washington, DC. Before coming to the National Academies, Ms. Ramey-McCray worked for the American Psychological Society and the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Sulvia Doja, M.S.H.C.P.M., was a research associate at the National Academies through August 2016, and worked on studies addressing occupational and environmental exposures, health diagnostic criteria, and treatment guidelines. She earned her masters of science degree in health care policy and management from Carnegie Mellon University’s H. John Heinz III College and her undergraduate degree in biology with a minor in chemistry from Chatham College. Before coming to the National Academies, she researched the effect of national health care

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23677.
×

reform on American Indian and Alaskan Native populations and pioneered a social-media marketing outlet to increase customer visibility and enhance communication with that population.

Nicole Freid was a senior program assistant at the National Academies until October 2016. She worked to support several studies addressing occupational and environmental exposures among the veteran population. She earned her bachelor’s degree in economics and political science at American University in Washington, DC. Before coming to the National Academies, she worked at Avalere Health, a health care consulting firm, where she incorporated health policy analysis in final deliverables for pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23677.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23677.
×
Page 232
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23677.
×
Page 233
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23677.
×
Page 234
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23677.
×
Page 235
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23677.
×
Page 236
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Military operations produce a great deal of trash in an environment where standard waste management practices may be subordinated to more pressing concerns. As a result, ground forces have long relied on incineration in open-air pits as a means of getting rid of refuse. Concerns over possible adverse effects of exposure to smoke from trash burning in the theater were first expressed in the wake of the 1990–1991 Gulf War and stimulated a series of studies that indicated that exposures to smoke from oil-well fires and from other combustion sources, including waste burning, were stressors for troops. In January 2013, Congress directed the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to establish and maintain a registry for service members who may have been exposed to toxic airborne chemicals and fumes generated by open burn pits.

Assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry analyzes the initial months of data collected by the registry and offers recommendations on ways to improve the instrument and best use the information it collects. This report assesses the effectiveness of the VA’s information gathering efforts and provides recommendations for addressing the future medical needs of the affected groups, and provides recommendations on collecting, maintaining, and monitoring information collected by the VA’s Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry.

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