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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Overview." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Using Commodity Flow Survey Microdata and Other Establishment Data to Estimate the Generation of Freight, Freight Trips, and Service Trips: Guidebook. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24602.
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8The primary purpose of NCFRP Research Report 37 is to improve freight demand modeling by providing FSA models that practitioners and researchers could use to quantify FSA. In doing so, the guidebook describes both the process followed to develop the models and their application. Chapter 2 describes the relevant key concepts. Chapter 3 provides background information about urban economies and urban supply chains to help the reader understand the interconnections between the economic activities and FSA. Chapter 4 defines the various metrics that could be used to measure FSA: FG, FTG, and service trip generation (STG). Chapter 5 describes the principles that guided the model development. Chapter 6 discusses the modeling methodology. Chapter 7 identifies potential applications of FSA models and defines step-by-step processes for the most typical cases. Chapter 8 presents the final models that resulted from the statistical estimation process. Chapter 9 presents four illustrative applications of FSA models that differ in terms of the objective of the analysis, geographic scale, and the FSA metric that is estimated. Chapter 9 is followed by a list of the references cited in the guidebook. Appendices contain the technical details of the models and descriptive analyses of the data. C h a p t e r 1 Overview

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TRB's National Cooperative Freight Research Program (NCFRP) Research Report 37: Using Commodity Flow Survey Microdata and Other Establishment Data to Estimate the Generation of Freight, Freight Trips, and Service Trips: Guidebook provides policy makers with improved establishment-level models that estimate the Freight Trip Generation (FTG), the number of vehicle trips produced and attracted at a given establishment; the Freight Production (FP), the amount of cargo produced by the establishment; and the Service Trip Attraction (STA), and the number of vehicle trips that arrive at the establishment to perform a service activity. These models, estimated with the best data available, provide tools to assess the various facets of the overall Freight and Service Activity (FSA) that takes place in urban and metropolitan areas. The models will allow transportation practitioners to conduct sound curb-management, properly size loading and unloading areas, support traffic impact analyses, and improve transportation planning and management efforts.

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