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Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two (2017)

Chapter: Appendix B: Committee Meetings and Presentations

« Previous: Appendix A: Committee Biographical Information
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings and Presentations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24619.
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B

Committee Meetings and Presentations

NOVEMBER 11-12, 2015, WASHINGTON, D.C.

Briefing on DOE Solid-State Lighting Program

Jim Brodrick, Lighting Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

LED and Control Compatibility

Ethan Biery, LED Engineering Leader, Lutron

Lighting and LEDs Market Overview and Forecast

Stephanie Pruitt, Senior Analyst, Strategies Unlimited

NAS Issues for Committee Input

Jim Brodrick, Lighting Program Manager, DOE

JANUARY 5-6, 2016, WASHINGTON, D.C.

ENERGY STAR Certification and Market Share Lighting Products

Kathleen Vokes, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

ENERGY STAR Lighting: Overview of Lighting Specifications

Daniel Rogers, ICF International, on behalf of EPA

LED and OLED SSL Manufacturing Value Chain and Related DOE SSL Program R&D

P. Morgan Pattison, President, SSLS, Inc., and Senior Technical Advisor, DOE Solid-State Lighting Program

Future Directions in Solid-State Lighting: Next Generation LEDs and Laser Lighting

Steven DenBaars, University of California and Soraa Inc.

FEBRUARY 22-24, 2016, IRVINE, CALIFORNIA

Solid-State Lighting: The Interaction Between Incentives and Standards

Mary Anderson, Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Bringing OLED Lighting to Market

Michael Boroson, OLEDWorks

Desirable Future of Lighting

Jim Brodrick, DOE

NAS Symposium on Solid-State Lighting

Ken Rider, California Energy Commission

Assessment of Solid-State Lighting—Industry Experience

Ralph C. Tuttle, CREE

Untitled Presentation

Sebastian Suh, Manager, OLED Light, LG Display

Ecology, Physiology, Human Health, and Light

George C. Brainard and John P. Hanifin, Thomas Jefferson University Light Research Program

Plenary Presentation: National Academy of Sciences Symposium

Jed Dorsheimer, CANACCORD Genuity

Effects of Light on Human Health and Wellbeing: Research and Applications

Mariana G. Figueiro, Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Input for NAS Symposium on LED Lighting

Noah Horowitz, Center for Energy Efficiency Standards, Natural Resources Defense Council

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings and Presentations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24619.
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Emerging Lighting Applications

Robert F. Karlicek, ERC Director, Lighting Enabled Systems and Applications, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Ecology, Physiology, and Solid-State Lighting

Travis Longcore, University of Southern California

LED Lighting for Plant Applications

Neil Mattson, Cornell University

LED Lighting as a Platform for Indoor Positioning for Mobile Devices

Marc Saes, Acuity Brands, eldoLED, and Aleksandar Jovicic, Qualcomm, Inc.

Color Metrics: Where Are We? Where Are We Going To?

Yoshi Ohno, National Institute of Standards and Technology

OLED Lighting Discussion

Yuan-Sheng Tyan

APRIL 14-15, 2016, WASHINGTON, D.C.

Xicato Overview Presentation

Willem Sillevis Smitt, Xicato, Inc.

OSRAM Americas Company Presentation

John Tremblay, OSRAM Americas

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings and Presentations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24619.
×
Page 90
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Meetings and Presentations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24619.
×
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The standard incandescent light bulb, which still works mainly as Thomas Edison invented it, converts more than 90% of the consumed electricity into heat. Given the availability of newer lighting technologies that convert a greater percentage of electricity into useful light, there is potential to decrease the amount of energy used for lighting in both commercial and residential applications. Although technologies such as compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) have emerged in the past few decades and will help achieve the goal of increased energy efficiency, solid-state lighting (SSL) stands to play a large role in dramatically decreasing U.S. energy consumption for lighting.

Since the publication of the 2013 National Research Council report Assessment of Advanced Solid-State Lighting, the penetration of SSL has increased dramatically, with a resulting savings in energy and costs that were foreshadowed by that study. What was not anticipated then is the dramatic dislocation and restructuring of the SSL marketplace, as cost reductions for light-emitting diode (LED) components reduced profitability for LED manufacturers. At the same time, there has been the emergence of new applications for SSL, which have the potential to create new markets and commercial opportunities for the SSL industry.

Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two discusses these aspects of change—highlighting the progress of commercialization and acceptance of SSL and reviewing the technical advances and challenges in achieving higher efficacy for LEDs and organic light-emitting diodes. This report will also discuss the recent trends in SSL manufacturing and opportunities for new applications and describe the role played by the Department of Energy (DOE) Lighting Program in the development of SSL.

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