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Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop (2017)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
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Appendix C

Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators

Warner Anderson, M.D., left U.S. government civil service in 2014 to become medical director at JICGlobal, LLC. Dr. Anderson oversees health-related curriculum development, instructor standards and practice, and clinical integration and innovation. He is also Assistant Professor of Military and Emergency Medicine at the Uniform Services University of Health Sciences. Prior to joining JICGlobal, Dr. Anderson was a senior leader at the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, developing the Military Health System’s capacity and capabilities in global health engagement. As Director of International Health, he led the Medical Stability Operations Working Group and the Global Health Engagement Working Group, identifying gaps in U.S. Department of Defense capabilities; and oversaw development of the Medical Stability Operations Course and the Defense Medical Language Initiative. As a Special Forces–qualified colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve, Dr. Anderson was mobilized to active duty immediately after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He remained on active duty for nearly 7 years, as Associate Dean of the Joint Special Operations Medical Training Center and Deputy Commander of the Special Operations Medical Group, a command in the U.S. Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and Schools. Here, he oversaw training of 3,000 special operations medics, and refresher training for 600 qualified advanced practice medics and medical officers yearly. During active duty, Dr. Anderson deployed twice to Iraq. During the invasion, he was assigned to Civil Affairs, and was the Chief of Public Health for the Coalition Provisional Authority, leading reestablishment of public health and other health services for the reconstruction of Iraq. In April 2003 his team’s convoy

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

was ambushed and all members seriously or critically injured, including Dr. Anderson. He killed the attacker and performed immediate care on fellow team members before attending to himself, actions that won a Bronze Star Medial with Valor Device, a Purple Heart Medal, and Combat Action Badge. Upon redeployment, he received a second Bronze Star Medal. In 2006, Dr. Anderson again deployed to Iraq, this time as Command Surgeon for the Iraq Counter Terrorist Force (ICTF) and the Iraqi Special Operations Forces (ISOF). He developed curriculum for ICTF and ISOF medics, leading the “train the trainer” program, and served as senior combat medic on several high-risk hostage rescue and high-value target missions. Again, upon redeployment, Dr. Anderson was awarded a third Bronze Star Medal. Prior to mobilization for the Global War on Terror, Dr. Anderson was Chief of Emergency Medicine and Urgent Care at two major regional hospitals, and was EMS Medical Director for city, county, and Navajo Reservation jurisdictions, as well as Indian Health Service chief flight medical officer for the Navajo Reservation. In these positions, he was responsible for the continuing education and quality assurance of EMS in a region the size of Connecticut. Dr. Anderson served on the State of New Mexico EMS Board’s Standards of Practice Committee, and was New Mexico EMS Medical Director of the Year. Dr. Anderson has published several peer-reviewed articles on cross-cultural health communication.

Jalon Arthur, M.S., has dedicated 14 years of humble program service with Cure Violence, an evidence-informed health approach scientifically proven to reduce violence. During his tenure, Mr. Arthur has passionately served in several program roles and played an instrumental role in replicating the Cure Violence model (South Africa, New York, New Orleans, Chicago, Puerto Rico, etc.). Mr. Arthur also formerly led Cure Violence’s training and technical assistance efforts. As an individual who formerly engaged in violence, his commitment toward the preservation of life and transformation of highest-risk youth is heartfelt, and he views his work as a divine calling. Additionally, Mr. Arthur has played a lead role in securing support services (mindfulness, trauma, counseling, etc.) for staff and high-risk youth to further aid their growth and development as future leaders. Currently, Mr. Arthur serves as Director of Innovation and Development tasked with adapting the Cure Violence health approach to address multiple forms of violence (violence against women and children, youth violence, prison violence, violent extremism, trauma, etc.), and to use technology to further enhance reductions in violence in Cure Violence communities across the globe.

Haroon Azar, J.D., is DHS Regional Director for Strategic Engagement in Los Angeles. Partnering with the City of Los Angeles in November 2011, DHS established the first office of its kind in the nation. Mr. Azar’s primary

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

responsibility is strengthening the department’s relationships with state and local law enforcement, government officials, faith-based organizations and community groups, academic institutions, and the private sector. His office partners with both government and nongovernment entities locally to advance DHS’s risk mitigation mission. Previously, Mr. Azar worked as Deputy Director and Senior Policy Analyst for the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia in the Office of International Affairs at DHS headquarters in Washington, DC. His portfolio included providing the secretary and other senior leadership with policy counsel and management of international affairs related to homeland security. Additionally, Mr. Azar was responsible for negotiating bilateral and multilateral security agreements with international partners focusing on improving immigration policy, visa security, aviation security, border security, supply chain management, and countering violent extremism efforts. Mr. Azar received a J.D. from the UCLA School of Law where he focused on the intersection of national security and international law.

Georges C. Benjamin, M.D., MACP, FACEP(E), FNAPA, Hon FRSPH, Hon FFPH, is well-known as a health leader, practitioner, and administrator. Dr. Benjamin has served as the executive director of the American Public Health Association, the nation’s oldest and largest organization of public health professionals, since December 2002. He is a former Secretary of Health for the state of Maryland. Dr. Benjamin is a graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technology and the University of Illinois College of Medicine. He is board certified in internal medicine, a Master of the American College of Physicians, a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, and a fellow emeritus of the American College of Emergency Physicians. He serves on several nonprofit boards such as Research!America, the University of Maryland Medical System, and the Reagan-Udall Foundation. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine. In April 2016 President Obama appointed Dr. Benjamin to the National Infrastructure Advisory Council, a council that advises the president on how best to assure the security of the nation’s critical infrastructure.

Alejandro J. Beutel, M.P.P., is a researcher for Countering Violent Extremism at the National Consortium for START. Prior to START, Mr. Beutel was the Policy and Research Engagement Fellow at the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding (ISPU), an applied research think tank specializing in the study and promotion of evidence-based development strategies for positive civic, social, and political engagement outcomes for American Muslim communities. He was also an independent research consultant to several nonprofit organizations, private corporations, and think tanks. At ISPU, he was co-principal investigator and project manager of the “Islamophobia:

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

A Threat to All” study, a research initiative that empirically analyzed anti-Muslim bigotry in the United States and provided actionable solutions to effectively combat it. As a consultant, Mr. Beutel authored several publications, including most recently, “Safe Spaces Initiative” a community-based tool kit to combat extremism and violence, published by the Muslim Public Affairs Council. Mr. Beutel graduated from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 2013 with an M.P.P. He also has a B.S. in International Relations and Diplomacy from Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey.

Michael Downing, LinCT, PNGEP, SMIP PERF, is the Commanding Officer, Counter-Terrorism and Special Operations Bureau where he leads five operational divisions: Major Crimes, Emergency Services, Metropolitan, Air Support, and Emergency Operations; dealing with intelligence, investigations, tactical response, and emergency preparedness. Deputy Chief Downing is also Chair of the Executive Board of the Los Angeles Joint Regional Intelligence Center and Vice Chair of the DOJ Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council. Deputy Chief Downing has testified before congressional subcommittees relative to intelligence, homeland security, information sharing, and prison radicalization. Chief Downing served as a member of the DHS Advisory Council working group on developing a national strategy for countering violent extremism. In October 2009, Deputy Chief Downing was appointed as the Interim Police Chief for the LAPD until the permanent police chief was appointed in November 2009. Deputy Chief Downing has also worked with DOJ and the U.S. Department of State, traveling throughout Africa, India, Kenya, Poland, South America, and Turkey in an effort to transition large national police organizations into democratic civilian policing models and overlay counterterrorism enterprises on top of cities. Deputy Chief Downing attended the University of Southern California where he received a bachelor of science degree in Business Administration in 1982, POST Command College 1997, the FBI’s Leadership in Counter-Terrorism (LinCT) in 2008, Post Naval Graduate Executive Program in 2009, and the Senior Management Institute for Police at Boston (SMIP PERF) in 2012. He is a senior fellow at the George Washington University Homeland Security Institute.

David Eisenman, M.D., M.S.H.S., is a Professor in the UCLA Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research. He directs UCLA’s Center for Public Health and Disasters. Prior to coming to UCLA, he was the Associate Director of the Bellevue/New York University (NYU) Program for Survivors of Torture and Assistant Professor of Medicine at the NYU School of Medicine. He holds appointments in the UCLA School of Public Health and the RAND Corporation. Dr. Eisenman holds an M.D. from the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, an M.S.H.S. from the UCLA School of Public Health, and a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania.

B. Heidi Ellis, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in Psychology and Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital Boston, and a licensed clinical psychologist. She is also the Director of the Refugee Trauma and Resilience Center at Boston Children’s Hospital, a partner in the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. Dr. Ellis’s primary focus is on understanding and promoting refugee youth mental health and adjustment, with a particular emphasis on understanding how trauma exposure, violence, and social context affect developmental trajectories. Over the past 14 years she has conducted a Community-Based Participatory Research program with Somali youth; she is currently principal investigator of a multisite, longitudinal research project examining developmental pathways to and away from violence, including openness to violent extremism, gang involvement, and constructive civic engagement. Dr. Ellis was an advisor to the Boston Pilot Project on countering violent extremism, and is currently developing a multidisciplinary model to promote community resilience to violence. She is also co-developer of the nationally recognized trauma treatment model, Trauma Systems Therapy.

Mehreen Farooq, M.A., is Senior Fellow at WORDE. Ms. Farooq’s areas of expertise include countering violent extremism, Muslim community engagement, and grass-roots community development. She received her M.A. in International Affairs from American University, focusing on the sociopolitical development of the broader Middle East. She is one of the lead researchers of WORDE’s projects to explore the capacity of local civil society organizations to promote peace and counter violent extremism. She has led fieldwork across 80 cities and villages in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and is currently researching the capacity of religious actors in Egypt to counter extremist narratives in Egypt and beyond.

Louise Flavahan, J.D., M.P.H., is currently the Director of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Forum on Global Violence Prevention and a Program Officer with the National Academies’ Board on Global Health. Prior to joining the National Academies in 2014, Ms. Flavahan represented the Duke University Sanford School of Public Policy as a Global Health Fellow within their Global Governance and Policy Program in Geneva, Switzerland. While in Geneva, she also completed an internship with the World Trade Organization’s Standards and Trade Development Facility. Ms. Flavahan holds both a J.D. and an M.P.H. from Case Western Reserve University and completed her undergraduate studies in English and political science at The Ohio State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

Dan Hanfling, M.D., is a consultant on emergency preparedness, response, and crisis management. He is a Contributing Scholar at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s Center for Health Security, Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine at George Washington University, and adjunct faculty at the George Mason University School of Public Policy. He currently serves as the co-chair of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Disasters and Emergencies. Dr. Hanfling spent 18 years as principal advisor to the Inova Health System on matters related to emergency preparedness and response. He continues to practice emergency medicine at Inova Fairfax Regional Trauma Center, and is an operational medical director for a regional helicopter EMS service. He was instrumental in founding one of the nation’s first health care coalitions, the Northern Virginia Hospital Alliance, created in October 2002. His areas of expertise include biodefense and mass casualty management, catastrophic disaster response planning with particular emphasis on scarce resource allocation, and the nexus between health care system planning and emergency management. In addition to his hospital and EMS clinical responsibilities, he serves as a Medical Team Manager for the Fairfax County–based FEMA- and USAID-sanctioned international urban search and rescue team (VATF-1, USA-1), and has responded to catastrophic disaster events across the globe. Dr. Hanfling received his undergraduate degree in political science from Duke University, including a General Course at the London School of Economics, and completed his medical degree at Brown University. He completed his internship in internal medicine at Brown University and his emergency medicine training at the combined George Washington and Georgetown University residency program. He has been board certified in emergency medicine since 1997.

John L. Hick, M.D., is a faculty emergency physician at Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) and an associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Minnesota. He serves as the associate medical director for Hennepin County emergency medical services and medical director for emergency preparedness at HCMC. He is medical advisor to the Minneapolis/St. Paul Metropolitan Medical Response System. He also serves the Minnesota Department of Health as the medical director for the Office of Emergency Preparedness and medical director for Hospital Bioterrorism Preparedness. He is the founder and past chair of the Minneapolis/St. Paul Metropolitan Hospital Compact, a 29-hospital mutual aid and planning group active since 2002. He is involved at many levels of planning for surge capacity and adjusted standards of care and traveled to Greece to assist in health care system preparations for the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of a 15-member team from CDC and HHS. He is a national speaker on hospital preparedness issues and has published numerous papers dealing

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

with hospital preparedness for contaminated casualties, personal protective equipment, and surge capacity.

Michael Jensen, Ph.D., is a senior researcher at the National Consortium for START at the University of Maryland, where he serves as the data collection manager for the Global Terrorism Database (GTD) and the principal investigator for the Profiles of Individual Radicalization in the United States (PIRUS) project. He holds a Ph.D. in political science from Arizona State University. Prior to joining START, Dr. Jensen was a postdoctoral fellow in the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University and the Associate Director of the Consortium on Qualitative Research Methods.

Leesa Lin, M.S.P.H., is the senior program manager of the EPREP Program, formerly known as the Harvard Preparedness and Emergency Response Research and Learning Centers (Harvard PERRC/PERLC) at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She has extensive experience working with domestic and international partners, including the World Health Organization, U.S. CDC, China CDC, and Europe CDC, as well as DHS. Harvard EPREP is currently leading the evaluation of the Boston Countering Violent Extremism pilot program. Specialized in public health emergency preparedness, global health, communication science, program evaluation, and social and behavioral sciences, Ms. Lin’s work has centered around the assessment of emergency risk communications, public health systems’ emergency preparedness capabilities and capacity, needs for vulnerable and at-risk populations, and assessment of population’s knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) during the preparedness for and response to actual public health emergencies ranging from earthquakes, outbreaks, and pandemics to water crises, snow emergencies, and volcano eruptions. More recently, she has applied public health program evaluation methods to initiatives that counter extreme violence perpetrated in the name of an ideology. Ms. Lin holds an M.S.P.H. in Global Health and Population from the Harvard School of Public Health and a B.A. in Psychology from the University of British Columbia.

Cynthia Lum, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society, and Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy at George Mason University. She researches primarily in the area of policing, security, and evidence-based crime policy. Her works in this area have included evaluations of policing interventions and police technology, understanding the translation and receptivity of research in policing, and assessing security efforts of federal agencies. With Drs. Christopher Koper and Cody Telep she developed the Evidence-Based Policing Matrix

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

and its associated demonstration projects, which are translation tools designed to help police practitioners incorporate research into their strategic and tactical portfolio. She is a member of the Research Advisory Committee of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the International Advisory Committee of the Scottish Institute for Police Research, the Board of Trustees for the Pretrial Justice Institute, and a Fulbright Specialist. She is the North American editor for Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice (Oxford), and the founding editor of Translational Criminology Magazine and the Springer Series on Translational Criminology. Dr. Lum holds a Ph.D. in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Rajeev Ramchand, Ph.D., is a senior behavioral scientist at the RAND Corporation. His research focuses on the prevalence, prevention, and treatment of mental health and substance use disorders in adolescents, service members and veterans, and minority populations. He has specific interest in the epidemiology of suicide and its prevention, and was lead author of The War Within: Preventing Suicide in the U.S. Military (2011, RAND). He is interested in applying novel approaches in the collection and analysis of survey data, and he formerly served as associate director of the RAND Center for Military Health Policy Research. Dr. Ramchand co-led RAND’s 2014 study on military caregivers, Hidden Heroes; he is currently working on studies examining disparities in mental health conditions among minority subgroups in the U.S. military and evaluating the types and quality of services provided on suicide crisis hotlines in California. His research has been published in such journals as the American Journal of Public Health, Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, AIDS and Behavior, Journal of Trauma, and Journal of Traumatic Stress. He received his B.A. in economics from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. in psychiatric epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Peter Romaniuk, Ph.D., is associate professor of Political Science at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, the City University of New York, and is a Senior Fellow at the Global Center on Cooperative Security (www.globalcenter.org). His recent work with the Global Center includes the reports Does CVE Work?: Lessons Learned from the Global Effort to Counter Violent Extremism and Preventing Violent Extremism in Burkina Faso: Toward National Resilience Amid Regional Insecurity (with Augustin Loada). His book, Multilateral Counter-Terrorism: The Global Politics of Cooperation and Contestation, was published by Routledge in 2010, and his articles have appeared in the RUSI Journal, Review of International Studies, the International Studies Encyclopedia, and the CPA Journal. He holds a B.A. (Hons) and an LLB (Hons) from the University of Adelaide,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

South Australia, and an A.M. and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Brown University.

Laura Runnels, M.P.H., is a strategist and facilitator with LARC, a Washington, DC-based consulting firm. She was born on a mountaintop in Tennessee, raised in a small-town in Mississippi, and educated in California, Connecticut, and Missouri. She has more 12 years of experience providing capacity-building assistance, training, and coaching to local, state, and federal clients. She is known for designing and facilitating highly collaborative, efficient, and productive meetings, workshops, and trainings. As a strategist, she guides individuals, organizations, and coalitions through technical and adaptive challenges. Ms. Runnels holds an M.P.H. from Saint Louis University and completed her undergraduate studies at Yale University.

Irfan Saeed, J.D., is the director for CVE, Bureau of Counterterrorism and Countering Violent Extremism, at the U.S. Department of State. Mr. Saeed manages an office that leads strategy and policy formulation for international CVE efforts of the United States. Previously, Mr. Saeed served in the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan, where he developed the Community Engagement Office, the first of its kind in U.S. embassies worldwide, to use traditional public diplomacy tools to counter violent extremism in Pakistan. Prior to joining the U.S. Department of State, Mr. Saeed was a senior policy advisor at DHS, Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, where he developed and coordinated activities relating to countering violent extremism. Prior to joining DHS, Mr. Saeed worked as a criminal prosecutor, at the state and federal levels. Mr. Saeed worked as an Assistant U.S. Attorney, DOJ, in the Eastern District of Louisiana, as well as an Assistant District Attorney, in New Orleans, Louisiana. He served as the Resident Legal Advisor at U.S. embassies in Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan.

George Selim, M.P.A., serves as the director in the Office for Community Partnerships at DHS and director of the CVE Task Force. Before joining the Task Force, Mr. Selim served for 4 years as the director for community partnerships on the White House’s National Security Staff, where he focused on building public–private partnerships to address homeland security priorities. Previously, he served as a senior policy advisor in DHS’s Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties.

Joumana Silyan-Saba, M.A., currently serves in the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Public Safety. In her role, Ms. Silyan-Saba is leading the city’s effort as the Director of the intervention and prevention strategies against violent extremism. She organizes regional partners and resources to bolster community-led prevention and intervention services alternatives to ideo-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

logically motivated violence. She is a featured expert speaker including most recently a Homeland Security panel presentation with presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Mayor Eric Garcetti. Prior to that, she was a Senior Policy Analyst for the City of Los Angeles Human Relations Commission (City HRC), where she worked with diverse communities to promote healthy inter-group relations, pluralism, and civic engagement. Her efforts included working with faith and civic leaders, civil rights organizations, policy makers and academic institutes to bridge divides and address social justice concerns. Within the government structures her focus included working with local, state and federal agencies to provide recommendations aimed to improve community–government relations and expand community engagement concepts. Over the past 8 years, she has been at the forefront of developing the local framework for countering violent extremism and building healthy and resilient communities. Ms. Silyan-Saba has designed and implemented various training curriculums in the areas of conflict management, cultural fluency and human relations. Most recently, she worked with the U.S. Department of State to deliver training courses in Nepal and India. Prior to her city service Ms. Silyan-Saba was a Director at the Asian Pacific American Dispute Resolution Center. She managed staff operations and all mediation, conciliation direct services as well as community programs, training, outreach, and grant compliance. Ms. Silyan-Saba obtained her B.S. in Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement with a minor in Business Administration Human Resources Management at California State University Long Beach. She completed her M.A in Negotiation and Conflict Management at California State University Dominguez Hills, where she is currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor and teaches in the Negotiations and Peace Building Program graduate program.

Rebecca Skellett, manages the Strong Cities Network (SCN) at the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD). ISD is a London-based “think and do tank” that has pioneered policy and operational responses to the rising challenges of violent extremism and intercommunal conflict. SCN is the first global network of mayors, municipal-level policy makers, and practitioners united in building social cohesion and community resilience to counter violent extremism in all its forms. SCN recognizes that cities are uniquely positioned to safeguard their citizens from polarization and radicalization through partnerships with local communities. Previously, Rebecca worked on the front line of the U.K. government’s Prevent Strategy, working as a practitioner across several London boroughs. This role has seen her conduct extensive work with institutions, ideologies, and individuals including the management of case work via the United Kingdom’s Channel program, a referral mechanism for individuals at risk of radicalization. During her time as a Prevent practitioner, Rebecca worked with more than 200 institu-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

tions, trained 4,000 staff, and worked with more than 2,000 young people building resilience to extremist narratives. She is also a member of the U.K. Department for Education’s Expert Advisory Panel for Extremism.

Mark G. Stainbrook, M.P.A., is the second-in-command of the San Diego Harbor Police Department (HPD), which is the premier police presence on the San Diego Bay, the San Diego International Airport, and on all tidelands around the Bay. The department is composed of 170 employees and has jurisdiction in the five member cities of the Port District, which include San Diego, Chula Vista, Coronado, Imperial Beach, and National City. Mr. Stainbrook retired as a lieutenant from the Los Angeles Police Department, where he served in a variety of assignments including patrol, gangs, internal affairs, intelligence and counterterrorism. Mr. Stainbrook is a graduate of the Federal Bureau of Investigation National Academy in Quantico, Virginia. In his second career, Mr. Stainbrook is a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve with 30 years of military service. He was most recently assigned to Security Battalion, Camp Pendleton, California. His personal awards include the Navy-Marine Corps Medal for heroism, as well as the Army Commendation Medal and the Navy Achievement Medal. While serving in Iraq in April 2003, Mr. Stainbrook was tasked to reconstitute Iraqi police units in Baghdad. His experiences were chronicled in the article “Seven Days in Baghdad” (Police Magazine, December 2003). Mr. Stainbrook was extensively interviewed and quoted during Operation Iraqi Freedom by CNN, Good Morning America, Inside Edition, The Washington Post, and the BBC. He graduated with honors from California State University Long Beach with an M.P.P. His master’s thesis, “Attitudes of American-Muslims Towards Law Enforcement: A Comparison of Before and After September 11, 2001,” was the catalyst for his selection to a Fulbright Police Fellowship. During his Fulbright, Mr. Stainbrook was a visiting fellow at Leeds University in the Religious and Theology Department, and was also seconded to the West Yorkshire Police Force. He studied and worked in local West Yorkshire Muslim communities for 6 months, including the suburbs of Beeston, where the “7/7 London bombers” resided. He has worked with the U.S. Department of State in India, Kenya, and Nepal to train their police forces on counterterrorism, criminal intelligence, and community policing methods. Mr. Stainbrook has authored several law enforcement articles in Police Chief Magazine, including “Learning from the Lessons of the 2008 Mumbai Terrorist Attacks” and “Policing with Muslim Communities in the Age of Terrorism.” Mr. Stainbrook joined the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies as a Senior Fellow in June 2016.

Brette Steele, J.D., serves as acting deputy director of the CVE Task Force at DOJ. From 2013 to 2016, Ms. Steele served as senior counsel

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

to the Deputy Attorney General and coordinated DOJ’s efforts to build community resilience against violent extremism. She also chaired the DOJ Arab- and Muslim-American Engagement Advisory Committee and vice chaired the Attorney General’s Advisory Committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities. Before joining the Office of the Deputy Attorney General, she coordinated departmental CVE policy through the Office of Legal Policy. Ms. Steele graduated with a B.A. from University of California, Berkeley, and a J.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law.

Kiersten Stewart, M.A., is director of Public Policy for Futures Without Violence and leads the organization’s Washington, DC, office. Previously she was the chief of staff to U.S. Representative Maurice Hinchey (D-NY). She received her M.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and her B.S. from Northwestern University.

Susan Szmania, Ph.D., is a senior researcher at the University of Maryland’s National Consortium for START with a specialization in CVE. She is currently on an intergovernmental personnel agreement assignment to DHS, where she is a Senior Advisor in the Office for Community Partnerships. In this capacity, she also serves as the Chief of the Research and Analysis line of effort for the interagency CVE Task Force, established in January 2016, to synchronize federal CVE activities. Prior to her work at START and DHS, Dr. Szmania served at U.S. embassies in Spain and Sweden, where she developed and implemented CVE programs. She received her Ph.D. from The University of Texas with a focus on conflict resolution and restorative justice.

Jihad Turk, M.A., the president of Bayan Claremont Islamic Graduate School and former Imam and director of Religious Affairs at the Islamic Center of Southern California, has dedicated the past decade to improving the relations between the Muslim community and other faith traditions in Southern California. Having been born to a Muslim-Palestinian father and a Christian-American mother in Phoenix, Arizona, Mr. Turk spent his college years traveling the Muslim world and exploring his roots and the Islamic tradition. He spent time in both the Islamic University of Medina where he studied Arabic and Islamic Studies and to Iran where he studied Farsi at the University of Tehran and in Qum. He completed his undergraduate study at the University of California, Berkeley, where he received his B.A. degree in History and Arabic. Mr. Turk completed his master’s degree at The University of Texas at Austin in Arabic and Islamic law and jurisprudence, and he has taught Islamic Studies and Arabic as adjunct faculty for many years at the University of California, Los Angeles. In 2010, having served for 7

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

years as the Imam and religious director at the largest and oldest mosque in the Los Angeles area, the Islamic Center of Southern California, Mr. Turk went on to found the nation’s first accredited Islamic seminary, Bayan Claremont. Mr. Turk has co-founded the Muslim–Christian Consultative Group composed of major Southern California Muslim leaders and the judicatory representatives of mainline protestant denominations as well as the Catholic archdiocese. This group pairs up mosques and churches nationally. He has organized many interfaith events including an annual interfaith 9/11 memorial held at the Islamic Center and has led several interfaith trips to the Holy Land. Mr. Turk has been consulted by the White House and has traveled around the world (France, Indonesia, Morocco, and Qatar) for the U.S. Department of State to speak to Muslim communities abroad and represent the American Muslim community. Mr. Turk is a member of the U.S. Indonesia Society, a nongovernmental organization that aims to strengthen ties between the United States and Indonesia. Mr. Turk was profiled on the front page of the Los Angeles Times, regularly appears on NPR and other news outlets, has appeared numerous times on the History Channel, and was featured in a documentary produced by the Annenberg Foundation’s www.explore.org about the Abrahamic faiths, titled “Traveling with Jihad.” Mr. Turk has received awards for his religious leadership by U.S. Representative Jane Harmon, the Valley Interfaith Council, and the South Coast Interfaith Council, and he has been acknowledged as a Local Hero in 2008 by the World Festival of Sacred Music. Mr. Turk also sits on the board of a Muslim-Jewish peace organization, the ReGeneration, which is developing a model for education that nurtures understanding and peaceful coexistence between Israelis and Palestinians.

Stevan Weine, M.D., is a professor of Psychiatry at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, where he is also the director of the International Center on Responses to Catastrophes and the director of Global Health Research Training at the Center for Global Health. For 25 years he has been conducting research both with refugees and migrants in the United States and in postconflict countries, focused on mental health, health, and countering violent extremism. He leads an active, externally funded research program that has been supported by multiple federal, state, university, and foundation grants, from 1998 to the present, all with collaboration from community partners. To date, this includes eight grants from the National Institute of Mental health, two from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, three from the Fogarty International enter, four from the Department of Homeland Security, two from the National Institute of Justice, one from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and one from the Office of Aids Research. Dr. Weine is author of When History Is a Nightmare: Lives and Memories of Ethnic Cleansing in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

Bosnia-Herzegovina (Rutgers, 1999) and Testimony and Catastrophe: Narrating the Traumas of Political Violence (Northwestern, 2006).

Leana Wen, M.D., is the Baltimore City health commissioner. An emergency physician and patient and community advocate, she leads the Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD), the oldest health department in the United States, formed in 1793. BCHD is an agency with a $130 million annual budget and 1,000 employees that aims to promote health and improve well-being through education, policy/advocacy, and direct service delivery. BCHD’s wide-ranging responsibilities include maternal and child health, youth wellness, school health, senior services, animal control, restaurant inspections, emergency preparedness, sexually transmitted infection/HIV treatment, and acute and chronic disease prevention. Since her appointment by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in January 2015, Dr. Wen has been reimagining the role of public health as being critical to all aspects of urban revitalization. Her transformative approach involves engaging hospitals and returning citizens in violence prevention; launching one of the most ambitious opioid overdose prevention programs in the country that is training every resident to save lives; and implementing a citywide youth health and wellness strategy. Following the civil unrest in April 2015, she directed Baltimore’s public health recovery efforts, including ensuring prescription medication access to seniors after the closure of over a dozen pharmacies and developing the Mental Health/Trauma Recovery Plan. Most recently, Dr. Wen has been an attending physician and Director of Patient-Centered Care in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the George Washington University (GW). A professor of Emergency Medicine at the School of Medicine and of Health Policy at the School of Public Health, she codi-rected GW’s Residency Fellowship in Health Policy, co-led a new national collaboration on health policy and social mission with Kaiser Permanente, and served as founding director of Who’s My Doctor, a campaign calling for radical transparency in medicine. The author of the critically acclaimed book When Doctors Don’t Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary Tests, Dr. Wen has given six popular TED and TEDMED talks on patient-centered care, public health leadership, and health care reform. Her TED talk on transparency has been viewed nearly 1.5 million times. Dr. Wen received her medical training from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, where she was a Clinical Fellow at Harvard Medical School. A Rhodes Scholar, she studied public health and health policy at the University of Oxford, and worked as a community organizer in Los Angeles and St. Louis. She has served as a consultant with the World Health Organization, Brookings Institution, and China Medical Board; an advisor to the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute and the Lown

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

Institute; and as national president of the American Medical Student Association and American Academy of Emergency Medicine-Resident & Student Association. In 2005, she was selected by the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services to represent physicians-in-training on the Council on Graduate Medical Education, an advisory commission to Congress. In 2010, she served as chair of the Young Professionals Council, a global leadership network of medical, nursing, and public health professionals. In addition to her extensive scholarship in public health and patient safety, Dr. Wen has conducted health systems research in China, Denmark, D.R. Congo, Nigeria, Rwanda, Singapore, Slovenia, and South Africa. She has published more than 100 articles, including in the Lancet, JAMA, and Health Affairs. She is regularly featured on NPR, CNN, Fox, MSNBC, The Atlantic, USA Today, the Baltimore Sun, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. Dr. Wen has been honored by the Daily Record as 1 of the 100 most influential Marylanders and by the Baltimore Business Journal’s “40 under 40.” She is the recipient of the Greater Baltimore Committee’s Dr. Elijah Saunders Trailblazers Award and the National Association of Health Services Executives Leadership Award.

Matthew Wynia, M.D., M.P.H., is the Director of the University of Colorado’s Center for Bioethics and Humanities, on the Anschutz Medical Campus. Dr. Wynia’s training is in internal medicine, infectious diseases, public health, and health services research. Prior to moving to Colorado in July 2015, he worked at the American Medical Association (AMA) and the University of Chicago. At the AMA, he was Director of Patient and Physician Engagement for Improving Health Outcomes, and he developed a research institute and training programs focusing on bioethics, professionalism, and policy issues (the AMA Institute for Ethics). He also founded the AMA’s Center for Patient Safety. His research has focused on understanding and improving practical management of ethical issues in medicine and public health. He has led projects on a wide variety of issues related to ethics and professionalism, including public health and disaster ethics; understanding and measuring the ethical climate of health care organizations and systems; ethics and quality improvement; communication, team-based care and engaging patients as members of the team; defining physician professionalism; medicine and the Holocaust (with the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum); and inequities in health and health care. He has served on committees, expert panels, and as a reviewer for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, The Joint Commission, federal agencies, the Hastings Center, the American Board of Medical Specialties, and other organizations, and he has delivered more than two dozen named lectures and visiting professorships nationally and internationally. Dr. Wynia is the author of more than 140 published articles,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×

chapters, and essays. His work has appeared in JAMA, the New England Journal of Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, Heath Affairs, and other leading medical and ethics journals, and he is a contributing editor at the American Journal of Bioethics. Dr. Wynia is a past president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, and he has chaired the Ethics Forum of the American Public Health Association and the Ethics Committee of the Society for General Internal Medicine. He has current board certifications in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, and he cares for patients at the University of Colorado Hospital.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24638.
×
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Countering Violent Extremism Through Public Health Practice: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
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Countering violent extremism consists of various prevention and intervention approaches to increase the resilience of communities and individuals to radicalization toward violent extremism, to provide nonviolent avenues for expressing grievances, and to educate communities about the threat of recruitment and radicalization to violence. To explore the application of health approaches in community-level strategies to countering violent extremism and radicalization, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a public workshop in September 2016. Participants explored the evolving threat of violent extremism and radicalization within communities across America, traditional versus health-centered approaches to countering violent extremism and radicalization, and opportunities for cross-sector and interdisciplinary collaboration and learning among domestic and international stakeholders and organizations. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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