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Supporting Students' College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies (2017)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Supporting Students' College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24697.
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Appendix C

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

JOAN HERMAN (Chair) is co-director emeritus of the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she currently serves as senior research scientist. Her research has explored the effects of testing on schools and the design of assessment systems to support school planning and instructional improvement. Her recent work focuses on the validity and utility of teachers’ formative assessment practices and the assessment of deeper learning. She also has wide experience as an evaluator of school reform. Dr. Herman is past president of the California Educational Research Association and has held a variety of leadership positions in the American Educational Research Association, National Organization of Research Centers, and Knowledge Alliance. She is an elected member of the National Academy of Education and fellow of the American Educational Research Association. Dr. Herman is current editor of Educational Assessment, served on the Joint Committee for the Revision of Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, and is a member of the National Academies’ Board on Testing and Assessment. She received her B.A. in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley; was awarded an M.A. and Ed.D. in Learning and Instruction from the University of California, Los Angeles; and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

DAVID BILLS is associate dean for academic affairs and graduate programs at the University of Iowa College of Education and professor of the sociology of education. He holds a secondary appointment in the Department of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Supporting Students' College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24697.
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Sociology. Dr. Bills’ research interests are in social stratification, education and the workplace, labor markets, technological and organizational change, educational demography, and social inequality. His current work focuses on the growing role of labor market intermediaries and employers’ use of algorithms for personnel decisions. Dr. Bills has held short-term appointments at the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung and the Institute for the Study of Social Inequality in Amsterdam. He is collaborating on various research projects with colleagues from Brazil, Germany, Ukraine, Italy, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, and Albania. He holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

CORBIN M. CAMPBELL is assistant professor of higher education at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research focuses on understanding the organizational contexts that support learning and growth for students and faculty in higher education. Her recent work focuses on the assessment of quality in higher education and how the conceptualization and measurement of quality may serve to incubate (or alternatively result in pulling away from) college teaching and learning. Her secondary work explores the organizational contexts that facilitate faculty’s sense of agency in their careers. Dr. Campbell received a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation fellowship and subsequent funding from the Spencer Foundation for her work on assessing college educational quality. She serves on the editorial boards of Review of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, and the Journal of College Student Development. She holds a Ph.D. in higher education from the University of Maryland, an M.A. from the Ohio State University, and a B.A. in psychology from the University of Virginia.

TABBYE CHAVOUS is professor of education and psychology and associate dean for academic programs and initiatives at the Rackham Graduate School, University of Michigan (UM). Her research interests and projects center on social identity processes (around race/ethnicity, gender, and social class) among ethnic minority adolescents and young adults in secondary and postsecondary education contexts and implications for students’ academic identity development (including academic engagement and motivation), subsequent academic performance and persistence, and psychological adjustment. Her work also focuses on measurement and impacts of diversity and multicultural climates within secondary and higher education settings. Dr. Chavous is a principal investigator and co-director of UM’s Center for the Study of Black Youth in Context. She currently has an National Science Foundation grant for a project examining race, gender, and academic identification processes among college students pursuing academic pathways in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Supporting Students' College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24697.
×

science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. She received her Ph.D. in community psychology from the University of Virginia.

GREG J. DUNCAN is distinguished professor of education at the University of California, Irvine. He has published extensively on neighborhood effects on the development of children and adolescents and other issues involving welfare reform, income distribution, and its consequences for children and adults. His recent research has shifted from these environmental influences to the comparative importance of the skills and behaviors developed during childhood. In particular, he seeks to understand the relative importance of early academic skills, cognitive and emotional self-regulation, and health in promoting children’s eventual success in school and the labor market. Dr. Duncan was elected president of the Society for Research in Child Development for 2009-2011, was awarded the Klaus J. Jacobs Research Prize 2013, and received the Society for Research in Child Development Award for Distinguished Contributions to Public Policy and Practice in Child Development in 2015. Dr. Duncan is member of the National Academy of Sciences. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.

SYLVIA HURTADO is a professor and served more than a decade as director of the Higher Education Research Institute at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She has published numerous articles and books related to her primary interest in student educational outcomes, campus climates, college impact on student development, and diversity in higher education. She has served on a number of editorial boards for journals in education and served on boards including that of the Higher Learning Commission, and is past president of the Association for the Study of Higher Education. In 2015, she was awarded the Exemplary Research Award from the Postsecondary Division of the American Educational Research Association. Dr. Hurtado has coordinated several national research projects, including a U.S. Department of Education–sponsored project on how colleges are preparing students to achieve the cognitive, social, and democratic skills needed to participate in a diverse democracy. She is engaged in two National Institutes of Health projects on the preparation of underrepresented students for biomedical and behavioral science research careers. She obtained her Ph.D. in education from UCLA, Ed.M. from Harvard Graduate School of Education, and A.B. in sociology from Princeton University.

PATRICK C. KYLLONEN is senior research director of the Center for Academic and Workforce Readiness and Success at the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, New Jersey Center, where scientists conduct innovative research on higher education assessment; workforce readiness; inter-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Supporting Students' College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24697.
×

national large-scale assessment research; and assessment of 21st-century skills assessment, such as creativity, collaborative problem solving, and situational interviews. Dr. Kyllonen is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Educational Research Association. He is co-author (with A. von Davier and M. Zhu) of Innovative Assessment of Collaboration and has served on several National Academies committees. Dr. Kyllonen received his B.A. from St. John’s University and Ph.D. from Stanford University.

DAN P. MCADAMS is Henry Wade Rogers professor of psychology and professor of human development and social policy at Northwestern University. Currently, he also serves as chair of the Psychology Department. Professor McAdams works in the areas of personality and life-span developmental psychology. His theoretical and empirical writings focus on concepts of self and identity in contemporary American society and on themes of power, intimacy, redemption, and generativity across the adult life course. He is the winner of the Henry A. Murray Award from the American Psychological Association for research on personality and the study of lives, the 2006 Theodore Sarbin Award for contributions to theoretical and philosophical psychology, and the 2012 Jack Block Award from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology for career contributions to personality psychology. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association (Division 8) and the American Psychological Society, has served on the Executive Committee of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, and is a founding member of the Association for Research in Personality. Professor McAdams received his B.S. from Christ College, Valparaiso University in 1976, and his Ph.D. in psychology and social relations from Harvard University in 1979.

FREDERICK L. OSWALD is professor of industrial-organizational psychology in the Department of Psychology at Rice University. His substantive expertise deals with psychological testing and personnel selection within organizational, education, and military settings. Substantively, his work focuses on defining, modeling, and predicting societally relevant outcomes (e.g., job performance, academic performance, satisfaction, turnover) from psychological measures that are based on cognitive and motivational constructs (e.g., cognitive abilities, personality traits, situational judgment tests, job knowledge and skill, and biographical data). His statistical work in meta-analysis, structural equation modeling, and adverse impact also informs psychological testing and personnel selection issues in the research, practice, and legal arenas. Dr. Oswald is president of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (American Psychological Association [APA] Division 14). He is also a fellow of Evaluation, Measurement, and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Supporting Students' College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24697.
×

Statistics (APA Division 5); APA; and the Association for Psychological Science. He received a B.A. in psychology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1992 and his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Minnesota in 1999.

JONATHAN PLUCKER is Julian C. Stanley endowed professor of talent development at the Johns Hopkins University, Center for Talented Youth and School of Education. He was previously Raymond Neag endowed professor at the University of Connecticut and professor of educational psychology and cognitive science at Indiana University, where he was founding director of the Center for Evaluation and Education Policy. His work focuses on education policy and talent development. Recent work includes a research collaboration with the Partnership for 21st Century Skills and studies of creative and affective assessment. His work on defining and studying excellence gaps is part of a larger effort to reorient policy makers’ and educators’ thinking about how best to promote success and high achievement for all children. Dr. Plucker is a fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and recipient of the 2012 Arnheim Award for Outstanding Achievement from APA and 2013 Distinguished Scholar Award from the National Association for Gifted Children. He received his B.S. in chemistry education and M.A. in educational psychology from the University of Connecticut and his Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Virginia.

K. ANN RENNINGER is Dorwin P. Cartwright professor of social theory and social action and chair of the Department of Educational Studies, Swarthmore College. Her research interests include the role of interest in learning and development; the relationship between interest and other motivational variables; change in the cognitive and affective functioning of learners; and links among theory, research, and practice as they pertain to changed understanding. Her research program focuses on the role of interest in learning and conditions that support the development and deepening of learner interest. She studies these questions across a variety of contexts both in and out of school, including children’s play and students’ work with expository text, mathematical word problems, and science. Her studies are typically undertaken in collaboration with practitioners. A former Spencer Fellow of the National Academy of Education, she received a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and her Ph.D. in education and child development from Bryn Mawr College.

BRIAN STECHER is a senior social scientist at the RAND Corporation, an associate director of RAND Education, and a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. His research focuses on measuring educational

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Supporting Students' College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24697.
×

quality and evaluating education reforms, with particular emphasis on assessment and accountability systems. He has directed prominent national and state evaluations of No Child Left Behind, mathematics and science systemic reforms, and class-size reduction. His measurement-related expertise includes test development (prototype performance assessments for teacher certification, hands-on science tasks for middle school students), test validation (the quality of portfolio assessments in Vermont and Kentucky), and the use of assessments for school improvement (formative and interim assessments, the quality of classroom assessments, and measures of inter- and intrapersonal competencies). Dr. Stecher has presented findings to policy makers at the state and national levels, to practitioners, and to the public. He has published widely in professional journals and is currently a member of the editorial board of Educational Assessment. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Supporting Students' College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24697.
×
Page 239
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Supporting Students' College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24697.
×
Page 240
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Supporting Students' College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24697.
×
Page 241
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Supporting Students' College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24697.
×
Page 242
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Supporting Students' College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24697.
×
Page 243
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Supporting Students' College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24697.
×
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The importance of higher education has never been clearer. Educational attainment—the number of years a person spends in school—strongly predicts adult earnings, as well as health and civic engagement. Yet relative to other developed nations, educational attainment in the United States is lagging, with young Americans who heretofore led the world in completing postsecondary degrees now falling behind their global peers. As part of a broader national college completion agenda aimed at increasing college graduation rates, higher education researchers and policy makers are exploring the role of intrapersonal and interpersonal competencies in supporting student success.

Supporting Students’ College Success: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies identifies 8 intrapersonal competencies (competencies involving self-management and positive self-evaluation) that can be developed through interventions and appear to be related to persistence and success in undergraduate education. The report calls for further research on the importance of these competencies for college success, reviews current assessments of them and establishes priorities for the use of current assessments, and outlines promising new approaches for improved assessments.

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