National Academies Press: OpenBook

Appendices to NCHRP Research Report 842 (2017)

Chapter: Front Matter

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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Appendices to NCHRP Research Report 842. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24703.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Appendices to NCHRP Research Report 842. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24703.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Appendices to NCHRP Research Report 842. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24703.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Appendices to NCHRP Research Report 842. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24703.
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ACKNOWLEDGMENT This work was sponsored by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration, and was conducted in the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP), which is administered by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. COPYRIGHT INFORMATION Authors herein are responsible for the authenticity of their materials and for obtaining written permissions from publishers or persons who own the copyright to any previously published or copyrighted material used herein. Cooperative Research Programs (CRP) grants permission to reproduce material in this publication for classroom and not-for-profit purposes. Permission is given with the understanding that none of the material will be used to imply TRB, AASHTO, FAA, FHWA, FMCSA, FRA, FTA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology, PHMSA, or TDC endorsement of a particular product, method, or practice. It is expected that those reproducing the material in this document for educational and not-for-profit uses will give appropriate acknowledgment of the source of any reprinted or reproduced material. For other uses of the material, request permission from CRP. DISCLAIMER The opinions and conclusions expressed or implied in this report are those of the researchers who performed the research. They are not necessarily those of the Transportation Research Board; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; or the program sponsors. The information contained in this document was taken directly from the submission of the author(s). This material has not been edited by TRB.

The National Academy of Sciences was established in 1863 by an Act of Congress, signed by President Lincoln, as a private, non- governmental institution to advise the nation on issues related to science and technology. Members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research. Dr. Marcia McNutt is president. The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to bring the practices of engineering to advising the nation. Members are elected by their peers for extraordinary contributions to engineering. Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., is president. The National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) was established in 1970 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to advise the nation on medical and health issues. Members are elected by their peers for distinguished contributions to medicine and health. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president. The three Academies work together as the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions. The Academies also encourage education and research, recognize outstanding contributions to knowledge, and increase public understanding in matters of science, engineering, and medicine. Learn more about the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine at www.national-academies.org. The Transportation Research Board is one of seven major programs of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The mission of the Transportation Research Board is to increase the benefits that transportation contributes to society by providing leadership in transportation innovation and progress through research and information exchange, conducted within a setting that is objective, interdisciplinary, and multimodal. The Board’s varied committees, task forces, and panels annually engage about 7,000 engineers, scientists, and other transportation researchers and practitioners from the public and private sectors and academia, all of whom contribute their expertise in the public interest. The program is supported by state transportation departments, federal agencies including the component administrations of the U.S. Department of Transportation, and other organizations and individuals interested in the development of transportation. Learn more about the Transportation Research Board at www.TRB.org.

iii  TABLE OF CONTENTS APPENDIX A: DESCRIPTION OF MEASUREMENT SITES ...........................................A1 PHASE I – NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ....................................................................A2 PHASE II – NORTH CAROLINA ...............................................................................A9 APPENDIX B: ON-BOARD SOUND INTENSITY RESULTS ............................................B1 ON-BOARD SOUND INTENSITY DISCUSSION ....................................................B2 APPENDIX C: STATISTICAL ISOLATED PASS-BY DISCUSSION ...............................C1 COMPARISON OF TEST SITES ................................................................................C2 COMPARISON OF MEASUREMENT SITE AVERAGES ................................... C21 COMPARISON OF TESTING METHODS ............................................................. C27 APPENDIX D: ADDITIONAL CONTOUR ANALYSIS FOR HEAVY TRUCKS ...........D1 HEAVY TRUCK NOISE CONTOUR DISCUSSION ...............................................D2 APPENDIX E: METHODS OF FREQUENCY WEIGHTING ...........................................E1 MAXIMUM PROFILE LEVEL ADJUSTMENT FACTOR DEVELOPMENT ..........E2 ADDITIONAL HEAVY TRUCK EXAMPLES USING THE MAXIMUM PROFILE LEVEL METHOD .........................................................................................................E9 ENERGY SUMMATION ADJUSTMENT FACTOR DEVELOPMENT ................... E31

iv  APPENDIX F: TWO-POINT SOURCE DISTRIBUTION DEVELOPMENT ...................F1 FINAL MATCHING OF TWO-POINT SOURCE MODEL TO AVERAGE HEAVY TRUCK PROFILES ......................................................................................................F2 APPENDIX G: BARRIER/DISTRIBUTION ANALYSIS ....................................................G1 SITE AVERAGED PROFILES FOR VARYING BARRIER HEIGHTS .....................G2 MODIFIED HEAVY TRUCK PROFILES WITH A 12FT (3.7M) BARRIER.............G5 MODIFIED HEAVY TRUCK PROFILES WITH A 14FT (4.3M) BARRIER........... G17 APPENDIX H: MEDIUM TRUCKS DISCUSSION..............................................................H1 DISCUSSION OF MEDIUM TRUCK CONTOURS AND PROFILES ........................H2 APPENDIX I: LIGHT VEHICLES AND BUSES SUMMARY............................................. I1 LIGHT VEHICLE RESULTS ....................................................................................... I2 BUS RESULTS ..............................................................................................................I10 Note: The appendices published herein are the appendices to NCHRP Research Report 842: Mapping Heavy  Vehicle Noise Source Heights for Highway Noise Analysis. Readers can read or purchase NCHRP Research Report 842 at www.trb.org. 

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TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Web-Only Document 225: Appendices to NCHRP Research Report 842 contains nine appendices to NCHRP Research Report 842: Mapping Heavy Vehicle Noise Source Heights for Highway Noise Analysis. NCHRP Research Report 842 provides an analysis to determine height distributions and spectral content for heavy vehicle noise sources. The report also explores establishing and beginning the development of an extended heavy vehicle (truck and bus) noise source database for incorporation into traffic noise models, including future versions of the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Transportation Noise Model (TNM) acoustical code.

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