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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
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Appendix B

Workshop Agenda

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2016

8:30 am ET Welcome
David Relman, Forum Chair
8:35 am Building risk communication capacity: Can it be done?
John Rainford, The Warning Project
8:45 am Perspectives on achieving successful communications for infectious disease threats
Maryn McKenna, Independent Journalist and Author
8:55 am Opening remarks
Stefano Bertuzzi, American Society for Microbiology
9:05 am Workshop overview and goals
Jeff Duchin, Workshop Chair
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
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Session I: Laying the Foundation for Effective Communication

PART A
Doug Storey, Moderator
9:10 am An overview of successful communication capacity
Baruch Fischhoff, Carnegie Mellon University
Learning from the social/behavioral/decision science field(s)
Angie Fagerlin, University of Utah
Evidence-based methods and evaluation strategies
Gary Kreps, George Mason University
10:45 am Break
11:00 am PART B
Baruch Fischhoff, Moderator
Drivers of risk perception, effective communication, and behavior change
Noel Brewer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Risk perception, responsiveness, and avoidance
Rajiv Rimal, George Washington University
Sources of information about disease outbreak and community trust: Lessons from Ebola communication in Liberia
Monique Turner, George Washington University
Advocacy and communication of health risks: Examples from tobacco control
Jeff Niederdeppe, Cornell University
12:30 pm Lunch break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

Session II: Achieving Effective Communication

1:30 pm PART A
Jennifer Gardy, Moderator
Packaging a story: Traditional versus digital media
Dina Maron, Scientific American
Responding to misinformation and rumors
Heidi Larson, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
3:00 pm Break
3:15 pm PART B
Jennifer Olsen, Moderator
Participatory surveillance and social listening
Kacey Ernst, University of Arizona
Bidirectional communication platforms
Nick van Praag, Ground Truth Solutions
Building capacity: Training of trainers
Damien Chalaud, World Federation of Science Journalists
4:45 pm Highlights and key lessons learned
Jeff Duchin, Workshop Chair
5:00 pm Adjournment and reception
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2016

8:30 am ET Welcome and objectives
Jeff Duchin, Workshop Chair

Session III: International Context—International Health Regulations Considerations, Lessons from Recent Outbreaks, and Research Gaps

8:40 am PART A
Rima Khabbaz and Rafael Obregon, Moderators
Lessons from the field: The role of data and evidence in Ebola and Zika outbreaks
Rev. John Sumo, Ministry of Health, Liberia
Julienne Anoko, Sorbonne University
Katherine Lyon Daniel, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
10:15 am Break
10:30 am PART B
Rima Khabbaz and Rafael Obregon, Moderators
Strengthening risk communication and community engagement in disease outbreak response: A systems perspective
Gaya Gamhewage, World Health Organization
Erma Manoncourt, M&D Consulting
11:50 am Concluding remarks
Lonnie King, Forum Vice Chair
12:00 pm Adjournment
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 103
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 104
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 105
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24738.
×
Page 106
Next: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators »
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Building communication capacity is a critical piece of preparing for, detecting, and responding to infectious disease threats. The International Health Regulations (IHR) establish risk communication—the real-time exchange of information, advice, and opinions between experts or officials and people who face a threat to their survival, health, and economic or social well-being—as a core capacity that World Health Organization member states must fulfill to strengthen the fight against these threats. Despite global recognition of the importance of complying with IHR, 67 percent of signatory countries report themselves as not compliant. By investing in communication capacity, public health and government officials and civil society organizations facing health crises would be prepared to provide advice, information, and reassurance to the public as well as to rapidly develop messages and community engagement activities that are coordinated and take into account social and behavioral dynamics among all sectors.

To learn about current national and international efforts to develop the capacity to communicate effectively during times of infectious disease outbreaks, and to explore gaps in the research agenda that may help address communication needs to advance the field, the Forum on Microbial Threats of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a 1.5 day workshop on December 13 and 14, 2016, in Washington, DC. Participants reviewed progress and needs in strengthening communication capacity for dealing with infectious disease threats for both outbreaks and routine challenges in the United States and abroad. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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