National Academies Press: OpenBook

The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series (2017)

Chapter: Appendix A: Seminars Agendas

« Previous: 13 Epilogue After the Panel Discussions
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Seminars Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24751.
×

Appendix A

Seminars Agendas

The Chemistry of Microbiomes
Earth Seminar
September 20, 2016 from 2:00 PM–5:00 PM

Image

Keck Center of the National Academies
Room 201
500 Fifth Street NW
Washington, DC 20001

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2016

2:00 PM Doors Open, Room 201
2:10 PM Welcome and Introduction
Jim Fredrickson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
2:15 PM Illuminating the Dark Matter Beneath Our Feet
Kelly C. Wrighton, The Ohio State University
2:45 PM Life in High-Temperature Environments: Modern-Day Analogs of Early Earth Still Relevant Today
William P. Inskeep, Montana State University
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Seminars Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24751.
×
3:15 PM Exometabolomics Linking Genomes with Environments to Understand How Webs of Microbes Sustain Biomes
Trent E. Northen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
3:45 PM Discussion
5:00 PM Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Seminars Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24751.
×

The Chemistry of Microbiomes
Marine Seminar
October 19, 2016 from 2:00 PM–5:00 PM

Image

Keck Center of the National Academies
Room 100
500 Fifth Street NW
Washington, DC 20001

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

2:00 PM Doors Open, Room 100
2:10 PM Welcome and Introduction
Edward DeLong, University of Hawai‘i
2:15 PM Chemical Ecology as the Language of Microbiomes—and Life in General
Mark E. Hay, Georgia Institute of Technology
2:45 PM Examining the Chemical Interactions Within Oceanic Microbiomes Using Quantitative Proteomics
Mak A. Saito, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
3:15 PM Better Living Through Chemistry: Organic Nutrient Cycles and the Open Ocean Marine Microbiome
Daniel J. Repeta, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
3:45 PM Break
4:00 PM Discussion
5:00 PM Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Seminars Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24751.
×

The Chemistry of Microbiomes
Human Seminar
November 9, 2016 from 2:00 PM–5:00 PM

Image

Keck Center of the National Academies
Room 105
500 Fifth Street NW
Washington, DC 20001

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2016

2:00 PM Doors Open, Room 105
2:10 PM Welcome and Introduction
Barbara Gerratana, National Institutes of Health
2:15 PM Digitizing the Chemistry of Microbes: Its Importance, Current Status, and Opportunities
Pieter C. Dorrestein, University of California, San Diego
2:45 PM Strain-Specific Functional Profiling in the Human Microbiome and Its Molecular Environment
Curtis Huttenhower, Harvard University
3:15 PM Break
3:30 PM Discovering and Manipulating the Chemistry of the Human Gut Microbiome
Emily P. Balskus, Harvard University
4:00 PM Discussion
Viewers on the Web are encouraged to ask questions. Please submit questions to CSR@nas.edu or mention us on Twitter @NASEM_Chem.
5:00 PM Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Seminars Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24751.
×

The Chemistry of Microbiomes
All Systems Seminar
December 7, 2016 from 2:00 PM–5:00 PM

Image

National Academy of Sciences Building
Room 125
2101 Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20418

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2016

2:00 PM Doors Open, Room 125
2:10 PM Welcome and Introduction
Tina Bahadori, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
2:15 PM Talking with Molecules: Marine Bacteria and Microalgae
Mohammad R. Seyedsayamdost, Princeton University
2:50 PM Engineering the Microbiome
Timothy K. Lu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
3:25 PM Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling of Microbial Communities
Jennifer L. Reed, University of Wisconsin–Madison
4:00 PM Open Panel Discussion

Moderator: Carole Bewley, National Institutes of Health

Panelists: Trent R. Northen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (via WebEx)

Mak A. Saito, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (via WebEx)

Mark E. Hay, Georgia Institute of Technology (via WebEx)

Mohammad R. Seyedsayamdost, Princeton University

Timothy K. Lu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Jennifer L. Reed, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Discussion Questions:
  • What are the future research opportunities and challenges?
  • Are there unique technical challenges associated with this research?
  • Can we identify cross-system and cross-platform commonalities and opportunities for collaboration and integration?
5:00 PM Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Seminars Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24751.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Seminars Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24751.
×
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Seminars Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24751.
×
Page 98
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Seminars Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24751.
×
Page 99
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Seminars Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24751.
×
Page 100
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Seminars Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24751.
×
Page 101
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Seminars Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24751.
×
Page 102
Next: Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Seminars Planning Committee and Seminars Speakers »
The Chemistry of Microbiomes: Proceedings of a Seminar Series Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $58.00 Buy Ebook | $46.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The 21st century has witnessed a complete revolution in the understanding and description of bacteria in eco- systems and microbial assemblages, and how they are regulated by complex interactions among microbes, hosts, and environments. The human organism is no longer considered a monolithic assembly of tissues, but is instead a true ecosystem composed of human cells, bacteria, fungi, algae, and viruses. As such, humans are not unlike other complex ecosystems containing microbial assemblages observed in the marine and earth environments. They all share a basic functional principle: Chemical communication is the universal language that allows such groups to properly function together. These chemical networks regulate interactions like metabolic exchange, antibiosis and symbiosis, and communication.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Chemical Sciences Roundtable organized a series of four seminars in the autumn of 2016 to explore the current advances, opportunities, and challenges toward unveiling this “chemical dark matter” and its role in the regulation and function of different ecosystems. The first three focused on specific ecosystems—earth, marine, and human—and the last on all microbiome systems. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the seminars.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!