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Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use (2017)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Richard J. Bonnie, LL.B. (Chair), is the Harrison Foundation professor of medicine and law, professor of psychiatry and neurobehavioral sciences, professor of public policy, and director, Institute of Law, Psychiatry and Public Policy at the University of Virginia. He was elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) in 1991. He teaches and writes about criminal justice, bioethics, and public policies relating to mental health, substance abuse, and public health. He was associate director of the National Commission on Marijuana and Drug Abuse (1971–1973), secretary of the first National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse (1975–1985), and chair of a Commission on Mental Health Law Reform (2006–2011) at the request of the chief justice of Virginia. He has also served on the MacArthur Foundation’s research networks on Mental Health and the Law, Mandated Community Treatment, and Law and Neuroscience. Mr. Bonnie has chaired numerous consensus committees for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including multiple studies on tobacco policy, underage drinking, elder mistreatment, injury prevention, juvenile justice, and the health and well-being of young adults. He received the Yarmolinsky Medal in 2002 for his contributions to the NAM and the National Academies. In 2007, Mr. Bonnie received the University of Virginia’s highest honor, the Thomas Jefferson Award. He holds a B.A. from Johns Hopkins University and an LL.B. from the University of Virginia School of Law.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
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Hortensia de los Angeles Amaro, Ph.D., is associate vice provost for community research initiatives and dean’s professor of social work and preventive medicine at the University of Southern California. Previously, she served as associate dean and distinguished professor of health sciences and of counseling psychology in the Bouve College of Health Sciences, and director of the Institute on Urban Health Research at Northeastern University. Prior to that, she served as professor in the Boston University School of Public Health and School of Medicine. Her research interests include alcohol and drug use and addiction among adolescents and adults, substance abuse and mental health treatment for Latinos and African Americans, and alcohol and drug use among college populations. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and has received numerous awards from professional, government, and community organizations and honorary degrees from Simmons College and the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology. Additionally, she has served on review and advisory committees for the National Institutes of Health, including the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Amaro founded five substance abuse treatment programs for women in Boston and served on the board of the Boston Public Health Commission for 14 years. She received her Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Linda Burnes Bolton, Dr.P.H., R.N., FAAN, is system chief nursing executive and vice president for nursing at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles. Her research, teaching, and clinical expertise include nursing and patient care outcomes, improving organization performance, quality care, and cultural diversity within the health professions. She is co-investigator of the regional Collaborative Alliance for Nursing Outcomes research team and has made significant contributions to the advancement of nurses and other clinical team members in decreasing patient harm. Dr. Burnes Bolton is a past president of the American Academy of Nursing, American Organization of Nurse Executives, and National Black Nurses Association. She has provided leadership for several state and national programs, including service as chair of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation advisory committee on Transforming Care at the Bedside and the Veterans Affairs Commission on Nursing, and vice chair of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing at the Institute of Medicine. She is a trustee at Case Western Reserve University and a board member of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She received the James R. Klinenberg, MD and Lynne Klinenberg-Linkin Endowed Chair in 2016. Dr. Burnes Bolton earned her B.S. degree in nursing from Arizona State University. She received her M.S.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×

degree in nursing as well as her M.P.H. and Dr.P.H. from the University of California, Los Angeles. She was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2015.

Jonathan P. Caulkins, Ph.D., is university professor of operations research and public policy in the Heinz College of Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests include modeling the effectiveness of interventions related to drugs, crime, violence, delinquency, and prevention. He has been on the Heinz College faculty since 1990, with leaves of absence to be co-director of RAND’s Drug Policy Research Center in Santa Monica (1994–1996), to found RAND’s Pittsburgh Office (1999–2001), and to teach at Carnegie Mellon’s campus in Doha, Qatar (2005–2011). He has published on such topics as epidemiological models for examining marijuana use over the life course and evidence of the effectiveness of drug policy interventions. Dr. Caulkins serves or has served on the editorial board of Management Science, Operations Research, Mathematical and Computer Modelling, Journal of Drug Issues, Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, and I/S: A Journal of Law and Policy for the Information Society, and has refereed for more than 85 different journals. He completed his undergraduate work in engineering and computer science at Washington University in St. Louis. He holds master’s degrees in systems science and mathematics (Washington University, 1987) and electrical engineering and computer science (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1989) and a Ph.D. in operations research (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1990).

David Clark, M.D., Ph.D., is professor of anesthesia, perioperative medicine and pain at Stanford University and director of the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Pain Clinic, and as such comes into contact with pain and its consequences in many settings. Commonly encountered pain consultations include patients with very difficult-to-manage postoperative pain, patients with chronic pain after surgical procedures, and patients with chronic pain syndromes related to war injuries. Referral to his pain management clinic due to difficulties with opioid management is extremely common. His laboratory has been dedicated for more than a decade to identifying mechanisms supporting chronic pain as well as maladaptations to opioids. Much of this work has focused on genetic mechanisms and approaches, including the use of laboratory animals and humans. Some of his laboratory’s findings have resulted in translational studies and clinical trials. Current projects include efforts to understand immunological contributions to chronic pain after limb injury, pain mechanisms after traumatic brain injury, and maladaptations to the long-term use of opioids. Dr. Clark received both his Ph.D. in pharmacology and his M.D. from Vanderbilt University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×

Eli Eliav, D.M.D., Ph.D., is a professor and the director of the Eastman Institute for Oral Health at the University of Rochester and the vice dean for oral health within the School of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Eliav joined the University of Rochester Medical Center in 2013. Previously, he served as the chair of the Department of Diagnostic Sciences, the director of the Center for Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain, and Carmel Endowed Chair in Algesiology at Rutgers School of Dental Medicine, part of Rutgers University. He earned his D.M.D. and Ph.D. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, specialized in oral medicine in Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem, and trained in the National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research. He is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Pain Society and International Association for the Study of Pain. Dr. Eliav’s current research projects involve orofacial pain, quantitative sensory testing, neuropathic pain, pain modulation, and the role of inflammation in neuropathic pain.

Garret FitzGerald, M.D., F.R.S., professor of medicine and pharmacology, is the McNeil professor in translational medicine and therapeutics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, where he chairs the Department of Systems Pharmacology and Translational Therapeutics and directs the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics. Dr. FitzGerald’s research has been characterized by an integrative approach to elucidating the mechanisms of drug action, drawing on work in cells, model organisms, and humans. His work contributed fundamentally to the development of low-dose aspirin for cardioprotection. Dr. FitzGerald’s group was the first to predict and then mechanistically explain the cardiovascular hazard from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). He has also discovered many products of lipid peroxidation and established their utility as indices of oxidant stress in vivo. Dr. FitzGerald’s laboratory was the first to discover a molecular clock in the cardiovascular system and has studied the importance of peripheral clocks in the regulation of cardiovascular and metabolic function. Dr. FitzGerald has received the Boyle, Coakley, Harvey, and St. Patrick’s Day medals; the Lucian, Scheele, and Hunter Awards; and the Cameron, Taylor, Herz, Lefoulon-Delalande, and Schottstein Prizes. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, a fellow of the American Academy of the Arts and Sciences and of The Royal Society, and an honorary member of the Royal Irish Academy.

Traci C. Green, Ph.D., M.Sc., is an epidemiologist whose research focuses on opioid use, addiction, and injury. Specifically, the areas in which she is most interested and to which she has contributed include the intersecting

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×

worlds of HIV infection and drug abuse, nonmedical use of prescription drugs, corrections health, drug policy, and opioid overdose prevention and intervention. By consequence, this work addresses issues of health disparities, gender, and place effects on health. She earned a master of science degree in epidemiology and biostatistics from McGill University and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from Yale University. Dr. Green helped design the ASI-MV®, a real-time illicit and prescription drug abuse surveillance system developed by Inflexxion, Inc. Currently, she is deputy director of the Boston Medical Center Injury Prevention Center and associate professor of emergency medicine and epidemiology at the Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University. Dr. Green chairs the Drug Overdose Prevention and Rescue Coalition for the Rhode Island Department of Health and advises the Rhode Island governor on addiction and overdose. She is a past recipient of salary support (<$3,000) from Purdue Pharmaceuticals for development of an educational brochure on overdose prevention for drug users injecting illicit pharmaceutical opioids. She is a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control and served on a workgroup to critically review the 2016 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain. Her research is supported by the CDC, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the U.S. Department of Justice.

Miguel Hernán, M.D., Dr.P.H., studies causal inference methods and implements them to evaluate strategies for the treatment and prevention of disease. Together with collaborators in several countries, he designs analyses of health care databases, epidemiologic studies, and randomized trials. Dr. Hernán teaches clinical data science at the Harvard Medical School, clinical epidemiology at the Harvard-Massachusetts Institute of Technology Division of Health Sciences and Technology, and causal inference methodology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, where he is the Kolokotrones professor of biostatistics and epidemiology and where he has mentored dozens of doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows. His book Causal Inference, co-authored with James Robins and freely available online, is used in graduate programs throughout the world. Dr. Hernán is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, past chair of the American Statistical Association Section on Statistics in Epidemiology, past associate editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association and of Biometrics, associate editor of the American Journal of Epidemiology, and an editor of Epidemiology. He has served on several committees of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×

Lee D. Hoffer, Ph.D., is an associate professor of anthropology at Case Western Reserve University. His research focuses on understanding the political, social, economic, and cultural contexts related to illicit drug use. His ongoing research involves synthesizing computational modeling techniques and ethnographic research to develop new tools for policy makers and researchers. Borrowing from theories of complexity systems, these projects seek to connect the rich descriptive detail offered by anthropology with the epidemiology of drug abuse. Dr. Hoffer’s research has informed a range of topics, including HIV risk behaviors, diagnostic nosology for substance use disorders, and understanding trends in drug use, as well as drug policy and intervention studies. More recently, his research examines how illicit drug markets and the acquisition of drugs influence behaviors and negative health outcomes. His fieldwork focuses on customer transactions, the interactions between addiction and drug acquisition, and the social and economic exchange relationships between users and their dealers. His book Junkie Business: The Evolution and Operation of a Heroin Dealing Network (2006), details much of this work. His research is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), as well as the National Science Foundation (Cultural Anthropology & Methods, Measurement, and Statistics program). From 1997 to 1999 he was Colorado’s representative to the NIDA Community Epidemiology Workgroup. He was also active in the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention HIV community planning efforts. From 2002 to 2005 he trained as a (T32) NIDA postdoctoral fellow in psychiatric epidemiology at Washington University School of Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention Research Group. From 2013 to 2014 he served on the National Research Council Committee on the Context of Military Environments: Social and Organizational Factors. He holds an M.A. in anthropology and a Ph.D. in health and behavioral sciences from the University of Colorado Denver and an M.P.E. (master of psychiatric epidemiology) from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Paul E. Jarris, M.D., M.B.A., is senior vice president, Maternal and Child Health Program Impact, and deputy medical officer at the March of Dimes. He leads the March of Dimes’ Maternal and Child Health Program Impact department, with overall responsibility for the March of Dimes Prematurity Campaign, which seeks to reduce the rate of preterm birth, the number one cause of death among babies in the United States. Dr. Jarris, a nationally known expert in national health care policy, clinical quality initiatives, and disease prevention and wellness, among other areas, previously served as executive director of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO). One of his many achievements at ASTHO was part-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×

nering with the March of Dimes to challenge all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico to lower their preterm birth rates. Dr. Jarris has had a distinguished career spanning 20 years leading policy and care initiatives to improve public health at the local, state, and national levels. Prior to his role at ASTHO, he served as commissioner of health for the State of Vermont, where he led health care policy matters and championed new public health initiatives, addressing access to care, prevention, and the factors that impact population health. In addition, he has held a number of health insurance executive-level positions, including president and CEO of Vermont Permanente Medical Group. Throughout his career, Dr. Jarris has received numerous prestigious awards and honors, and has served as a member of many health-related boards and committees. He received his B.A. from the University of Vermont, his M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and an M.B.A. from the University of Washington.

Karol Kaltenbach, Ph.D., is emeritus professor of pediatrics at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University and professor of psychiatry and human behavior (retired). She is the former director of Maternal Addiction Treatment, Education and Research (MATER), a division of the Department of Pediatrics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University. MATER includes Family Center, a comprehensive intensive outpatient treatment program for pregnant and parenting opioid-dependent women; My Sister’s Place, a long-term residential treatment program for women and children; and a research component. Family Center has provided the prototype both nationally and internationally for the management of opioid use disorders during pregnancy and the treatment of neonatal abstinence. Dr. Kaltenbach is a member of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence and has been the principal investigator of grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. She was the principal investigator at the Jefferson site for the NIDA MOTHER clinical trial comparing the use of buprenorphine and methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy and was the lead principal investigator of the MOTHER developmental follow-up study. She is a co-investigator of a NIDA-funded clinical trial investigating the use of buprenorphine in the treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and co-investigator of a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Children’s Bureau–funded intervention project investigating whether the use of a mindfulness-based parenting intervention for mothers with opioid use disorders can improve parenting outcomes. Dr. Kaltenbach is an internationally recognized expert in the field of maternal addiction and has published extensively on the management of opioid use disorders during pregnancy and NAS, trauma-informed treatment for pregnant and parenting women with substance use disorders,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×

and the effect of prenatal drug exposure on the perinatal and developmental outcomes of children. She has lectured throughout the world and has participated in the development of national guidelines for the management of opioid-dependent pregnant women and their neonates in Australia and Norway.

Aaron S. Kesselheim, M.D., J.D., M.P.H., is an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a faculty member in the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics in the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Within the Division, Dr. Kesselheim leads the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL), an interdisciplinary research center addressing intersections among prescription drugs and medical devices, patient health outcomes, and regulatory practices and the law. Current areas of focus include the research and development process; U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval; and the costs, availability, and evidence-based use of these products. In 2013, Dr. Kesselheim was named a Greenwall faculty scholar in bioethics by the Greenwall Foundation, which supports innovative empirical research in bioethics. Dr. Kesselheim’s work is also currently funded by the FDA, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Public Health Law Research Program, and the Laura and John Arnold Foundation. He has testified before Congress on pharmaceutical policy, medical device regulation, generic drugs, and modernizing clinical trials, and served as a consultant for the National Institutes of Health, FDA, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and numerous state government offices. Dr. Kesselheim also serves as a supervisor for the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School; a core faculty member of the Harvard Medical School Center for Bioethics; and a visiting associate professor of law at Yale Law School, where he teaches FDA law. He graduated from Harvard College and received his postgraduate training at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Law School, and most recently at the Harvard School of Public Health. He is board certified in internal medicine and serves as a primary care physician.

Anne Marie McKenzie-Brown, M.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Anesthesiology at Emory University, where she is the director of the Division of Pain Management and director of the Emory Pain Center. Her clinical expertise includes the diagnosis and treatment of cervical and lumbar spinal pain syndromes and sacroiliac joint pain, complex regional pain syndrome, other neuropathic pain syndromes, and cervicogenic headaches. She attended medical school at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and completed her residency in anesthesiology at the Emory Department of Anesthesiology. She is a member of several professional

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×

organizations, including the American Pain Society, the American Society of Anesthesiology, the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, and the North American Spine Society.

Jose Moron-Concepcion, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Departments of Anesthesiology and Neuroscience at Washington University in St Louis. Dr. Moron-Concepcion is a world leader in the study of the nervous system’s adaptive responses to chronic opioid exposure. Research in his laboratory is focused on understanding the mechanisms underlying opioid addiction and the intersection with pain. In addition, his lab is interested in elucidating mechanisms underlying pain in the central nervous system and in the periphery. After completing his Ph.D. in biochemistry at the University of Barcelona (Spain), Dr. Moron-Concepcion was awarded a fellowship to join the intramural program at the National Institute on Drug Abuse to work in the laboratory of Dr. Toni Shippenberg, a pioneer in the field of opioid pharmacology. Then, he continued his postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Lakshmi Devi at Mount Sinai, where he continued his studies on the mechanisms of opioid dependence. After completing his training, he was recruited as a faculty member in the Department of Pharmacology at The University of Texas Medical Branch. He then moved to Columbia University in New York, where he was on the faculty of the Department of Anesthesiology for 6 years. Dr. Moron-Concepcion joined the faculty of Washington University on October 1, 2015.

A. David Paltiel, Ph.D., M.B.A., is professor of health policy and management at both the Yale School of Public Health and the Yale School of Management. He employs the methods of operations research to address issues of resource allocation and decision making in health and medicine. He has conducted numerous model-based cost-effectiveness analyses of prevention, screening, and treatment interventions, including several widely cited studies of expanded HIV screening in the United States and abroad. He has served on guideline review and advisory committees for the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, the Institut de Veille Sanitaire (French national equivalent of the CDC), and the French National Agency for AIDS Research (ANRS). He has served on five previous project committees for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including panels that produced the 2004 report on the Ryan White CARE Act, the 2007 Evaluation of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, and the 2009 Review of Priorities in the National Vaccine Plan. Dr. Paltiel holds a B.A. from McGill University and received both an M.B.A. and a Ph.D. in operations research from Yale.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×

Valerie Reyna, Ph.D., is the Lois and Melvin Tukman professor of human development, director of the Human Neuroscience Institute, director of the Cornell University Magnetic Resonance Imaging Facility, and co-director of the Center for Behavioral Economics and Decision Research. Her research integrates brain and behavioral approaches to understand and improve judgment, decision making, and memory across the life span. Her recent work has focused on the neuroscience of risky decision making and its implications for health and well-being, especially in adolescents; applications of cognitive models and artificial intelligence to improving understanding of genetics (e.g., in breast cancer); and medical and legal decision making (e.g., about jury awards, medication decisions, and adolescent culpability). She currently has an unrestricted research grant from the Xerox Corporation and has studied treatment adherence in diabetes patients among other topics. She is a developer of fuzzy-trace theory, a model of the relation between mental representations and decision making that has been widely applied in law, medicine, and public health. Dr. Reyna has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine and is a fellow of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, the oldest and most prestigious honorary society in experimental psychology. She is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; the Divisions of Experimental Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Educational Psychology, and Health Psychology of the American Psychological Association; and the Association for Psychological Science. Dr. Reyna has been a visiting professor at the Mayo Clinic; a permanent member of study sections of the National Institutes of Health; and a member of advisory panels for the National Science Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. For example, she is on the Advisory Committee of the National Academies’ Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, which oversees 10 boards and standing committees, and serves as the chief scientific liaison and representative to the Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences of the Psychonomic Society. Dr. Reyna is the editor of Psychological Science in the Public Interest and sits on the editorial board of such journals as Decision and Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, leading journals in psychology. She has received many years of research support from private foundations and U.S. government agencies, and currently serves as principal investigator of several grants and awards (e.g., from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health).

Mark Schumacher, Ph.D., M.D., is a professor of anesthesiology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), with a clinical, research, and educational focus on pain management. He is currently division chief of pain medicine in the Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care. Dr.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×

Schumacher was the principal investigator for National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Drug Abuse awards in 2012 and 2015 to establish a Center of Excellence in Pain Education at UCSF. He has expertise in opioid and nonopioid strategies in pain control and has worked successfully to introduce multidisciplinary pain care and nonopioid analgesic strategies at UCSF Medical Center. His scientific achievements include being part of the team that isolated the Capsaicin Receptor–TRPV1, a major target in the development of nonopioid analgesic therapies. He is a member of several professional societies, including the International Anesthesia Research Society, the International Association for the Study of Pain, the American Pain Society, and the Association of University Anesthesiologists. Dr. Schumacher received his Ph.D. in physiology and pharmacology as well as his M.D. from the University of California, San Diego.

CONSULTANTS

Margaret (Mimi) Foster Riley, J.D., is a professor at the University of Virginia’s (UVA’s) Law School, has a secondary appointment at the medical school, and has an affiliation with the Batten School of Public Policy. Ms. Riley has written and presented extensively about health care law, bioethics, and food and drug law. She serves as chair of UVA’s Embryonic Stem Cell Research Oversight Committee and as legal advisor to the Health Sciences Institutional Review Board. She was a member of the National Research Council Committee Assessing Toxicologic Risks to Human Subjects Used in Controlled Exposure Studies of Environmental Pollutants and served on the National Research Council Committee on Revisions to the Common Rule for the Protection of Human Subjects. She has advised numerous committees of the Institute of Medicine, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Virginia Bar. Ms. Riley received her bachelor’s degree from Duke University and her law degree from Columbia University.

Patricia J. Zettler, J.D., is an associate professor of law and a faculty member of the Center for Law, Health & Society at the Georgia State University College of Law. She writes and teaches about food and drug law, health law and policy, and torts. Before joining Georgia State in 2015, she was a fellow at the Center for Law and the Biosciences at Stanford Law School. Prior to her fellowship, she served as an associate chief counsel in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Office of the Chief Counsel, where she advised the FDA and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on various issues, including drug safety, human subjects protection, expanded access to investigational drugs, over-the-counter drugs, dietary supplements, prescription drug advertising and promotion, incentives for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
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developing antibiotics, and advisory committees. In addition to her legal background, Ms. Zettler has bioethics experience through work at the Program in Medical Ethics at the University of California, San Francisco, and at the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. Ms. Zettler received her undergraduate and law degrees from Stanford University, both with distinction.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
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Page 444
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×
Page 445
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Consultants." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24781.
×
Page 446
Next: Appendix C: Existing Data Sources on Opioid Use, Misuse, Overdose, and Other Harms »
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Drug overdose, driven largely by overdose related to the use of opioids, is now the leading cause of unintentional injury death in the United States. The ongoing opioid crisis lies at the intersection of two public health challenges: reducing the burden of suffering from pain and containing the rising toll of the harms that can arise from the use of opioid medications. Chronic pain and opioid use disorder both represent complex human conditions affecting millions of Americans and causing untold disability and loss of function. In the context of the growing opioid problem, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) launched an Opioids Action Plan in early 2016. As part of this plan, the FDA asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to convene a committee to update the state of the science on pain research, care, and education and to identify actions the FDA and others can take to respond to the opioid epidemic, with a particular focus on informing FDA's development of a formal method for incorporating individual and societal considerations into its risk-benefit framework for opioid approval and monitoring.

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