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Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop (2017)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors

Peggy Bailey, M.P.A., is the director of the Health Integration Project at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, where she identifies opportunities to improve health care policy to better link with housing programs, serves those involved in the criminal justice system, improves quality and access to behavioral health services, and incorporates human services needed by vulnerable populations. Ms. Bailey’s career includes work on federal, state, and local policy and service delivery on a wide variety of issue areas, including Medicaid eligibility and benefits for families and people with disabilities, public health innovation, behavioral health service delivery and integration with primary care, youth homelessness policy and service delivery, and child welfare. Prior to joining the center in January 2016, she was the director of health systems integration for the Corporation for Supportive Housing. She has also worked for the National Alliance to End Homelessness, the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, and the City of Rockwall, Texas. Ms. Bailey holds a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Notre Dame and a master of public affairs degree from The University of Texas at Dallas.

Dara Baldwin, M.P.A., is the senior public policy analyst for the National Disability Rights Network (NDRN) in Washington, DC. NDRN, the nonprofit membership organization for the federally mandated Protection and Advocacy Systems and Client Assistance Programs, is the largest provider of legally based advocacy services to people with disabilities in the United States. She works on NDRN’s diversity and cultural competency

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×

team and is responsible for outreach as well as working on coalitions to assist with better legislative outcomes for the community. She has extensive knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and other disability laws. She has a keen ability for networking and outreach to grassroots, national, and international advocates. She has led multiple national and international advocacy campaigns. Prior to this position, Ms. Baldwin was an ADA compliance specialist in the DC government, a policy analyst at the National Council on Independent Living, a child advocate in New Jersey, and a senior policy analyst on criminal justice issues. She serves on the board of directors for the National Low Income Housing Coalition and has served as a trustee on the American Society for Public Administration’s board of insurance trustees for two terms. She has a bachelor of arts in political science from Rutgers University and was a Pi Alpha Alpha honors graduate with a master’s of public administration from Rutgers University School of Public Affairs and Administration.

Molly Dugan, M.P.A., started at Cathedral Square in October 2008, focusing primarily on new housing development, but also assisting with development of the Support And Services at Home (SASH) initiative. When the program design of SASH started full bore in July 2009, Ms. Dugan became statewide SASH director. Prior to Cathedral Square, she worked for the state of Vermont in the Community Development Program at the Department of Housing and Community Affairs (DHCA). She served as a senior community development specialist and then the director. Ms. Dugan became deputy commissioner of DHCA in August 2006 and then served as DHCA’s acting commissioner. She received a B.S. in economics and political science from the University of New Hampshire and an M.P.A. from the University of Vermont.

Rose Englert leads CareOregon’s Community Health Innovation Program department. The team aligns the clinical care of low-income Medicare and Medicaid members with tailored supports and services that address social determinants of health. With a focus on housing, food and nutrition, social support, and transportation, these interventions are showing positive early outcomes and defining the role of health plans within the social services realm. A health care professional with 17 years of public health, policy, and contracting experience, Ms. Englert has been active in the operations of a broad range of health-related nonprofits, corporations, associations, and professional alliances in multiple states.

Jennifer Molinsky, Ph.D., M.P.A., is a senior research associate at the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, where she manages the Joint Center’s work on housing for older adults. She was lead

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×

author on Older Households 2015–2035: Projections and Implications for Housing a Growing Population (2016) as well as Housing America’s Older Adults: Meeting the Needs of an Aging Population (2014). Dr. Molinsky’s work also touches on land use regulation, multifamily housing, and family-sized housing supply. She was a co-editor of the 2014 book Homeownership Built to Last: Balancing Access, Affordability, and Risk After the Housing Crisis. She is also a lecturer at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. Prior to joining the Joint Center, Dr. Molinsky served as the chief planner for long-range planning in Newton, Massachusetts; a researcher at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy; the associate director of issues at the Municipal Art Society of New York; and as a member of the planning board in Cambridge as well as other local planning committees. She has also held positions with Abt Associates and with PricewaterhouseCoopers’ government housing finance practice, where she worked on projects related to housing finance, affordable housing, and community development. She holds a Ph.D. in urban planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a master’s of public affairs, urban and regional planning, from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University, and a B.A. from Yale University.

Corneil Montgomery, Ph.D., is a senior program specialist at Habitat for Humanity International, where he is plays a key role in the design and implementation of the neighborhood revitalization program and strategy. In addition, he provides leadership and serves as principal strategist for Habitat’s aging in place strategy. With more than 7 years of experience in nonprofit and community development, Dr. Montgomery has expertise in combating complex and interrelated issues such as aging in place, housing, community stabilization, education, youth development, and more. In 2016, Dr. Montgomery obtained his doctoral degree in public policy and administration with a specialization in local government management for sustainable communities from Walden University. His doctoral research was titled “Adopting the Lifelong Communities Initiative in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area,” which entailed exploring the processes involved in planning and implementing an aging in place initiative at the regional and local levels. He is passionate about and committed to advocacy for and the development of sustainable and livable communities for people of all ages and abilities.

Anand Parekh, M.D., M.P.H., is the Bipartisan Policy Center’s (BPC’s) chief medical advisor, providing clinical and public health expertise across the organization, particularly in the areas of aging, prevention, and global health. Prior to joining BPC, he completed a decade of service at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). As the deputy assistant secretary for health from 2008 to 2015, he developed

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×

and implemented national initiatives focused on prevention, wellness, and care management. Briefly in 2007, he was delegated the authorities of the assistant secretary for health overseeing 10 health program offices and the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps. Earlier in his HHS career, he played key roles in public health emergency preparedness efforts as special assistant to the science advisor to the secretary. Dr. Parekh is a board-certified internal medicine physician, a fellow of the American College of Physicians, and an adjunct assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University, where he previously completed his residency training in the Osler Medical Program of the Department of Medicine. He provided volunteer clinical services for many years at the Holy Cross Hospital Health Center, a clinic for the uninsured in Silver Spring, Maryland. Dr. Parekh is an adjunct professor of health management and policy at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. He currently serves on the dean’s advisory board of the University of Michigan School of Public Health, the Presidential Scholars Foundation board of directors, and the board of directors of WaterAid America. He has spoken widely and written extensively on a variety of health topics such as chronic care management, population health, value in health care, and the need for health and human services integration. A native of Michigan, Dr. Parekh received a B.A. in political science, an M.D., and an M.P.H. in health management and policy from the University of Michigan. He was selected as a U.S. Presidential Scholar in 1994.

Erika Poethig, M.A., is an institute fellow and the director of urban policy initiatives at the Urban Institute. She leads the policy advisory group, which assembles Urban Institute experts to help leaders draw insights from research and navigate policy challenges facing urban America. She also leads partnerships to develop new programs and strategies, translate research into policy and practice, and align philanthropic investments and federal policy. Before joining Urban, Ms. Poethig was the acting assistant secretary for policy, development, and research at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. During her tenure in the Obama administration, she was also the deputy assistant secretary for policy development and was a leading architect of the White House Council for Strong Cities and Strong Communities. At the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, she was the associate director for housing. She also was the assistant commissioner for policy, resource, and program development at the City of Chicago’s Department of Housing. In the late 1990s, she developed Mayor Richard Daley’s campaign to combat predatory lending, prevent foreclosures, and stabilize communities. Previously, she was an associate project director of the Metropolis Project, which produced the Metropolis 2020 agenda for regional leadership around the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×

major issues faced by the metropolitan Chicago area. Ms. Poethig serves on the board of the Center for Community Progress and the Wooster board of trustees. Ms. Poethig was a Phi Beta Kappa member at the College of Wooster, a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Vienna, and has an M.A. with honors in public policy from the University of Chicago.

Emily Rosenoff, M.P.A., is with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in the Office of Disability, Aging and Long-Term Care Policy. Her work includes a focus on homelessness, housing with services, residential care and assisted living policy, and Medicaid home and community-based services policy. Ms. Rosenoff has also worked at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, and the University of California, San Francisco’s Center for the Health Professions. She received a master’s in public affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School and her bachelor’s degree in molecular and cell biology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Lisa Ryerson, M.S., has served as the president of AARP Foundation, AARP’s affiliated charity, since 2013. She is an experienced and innovative leader who is responsible for setting the foundation’s strategic direction and for leading the organization’s efforts to create opportunities for older Americans struggling with poverty and the related issues of hunger, income, housing, and social isolation. Ms. Ryerson has received numerous awards and honors for her leadership and service, both at the foundation and in previous positions. She has elevated the foundation’s visibility through innovative collaborations with other organizations, such as the National Football League’s Miami Dolphins. Under her leadership, the foundation has secured unprecedented funding to help provide programs and services that truly change lives. Before joining AARP Foundation, Ms. Ryerson served as the president and chief executive officer of Wells College in Aurora, New York.

Purvi Sevak, Ph.D., is a professor in the Economics Department at Hunter College of the City University of New York and a senior researcher at Mathematica Policy Research. Her research focuses on public policy and labor market outcomes for vulnerable populations including individuals with disabilities, older workers, and immigrants. Her work has been supported by the Social Security Administration, the U.S. Department of Education (National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research), and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research). Professor Sevak holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. She is

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×

a member of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management and the American Economic Association.

Lisa Sloane, M.P.A., has more than 25 years of experience working with federal, state, and local governments as well as nonprofit agencies to address the supportive housing needs of people with disabilities, including homeless individuals and their families. Her work in the area of ending homelessness includes the development and implementation of training as well as technical assistance to continuums of care and individual programs. She has also worked with the states of Pennsylvania and Louisiana to develop and implement permanent supportive housing programs. In Massachusetts, she played a key role in the development of innovative cross-disability housing programs, including a housing locator system, a state housing bond fund, and a state home modification loan program. She has expertise in the area of fair housing. Prior to joining Technical Assistance Collaborative (TAC), Ms. Sloane was principal of Sloane Associates, a woman-owned business that provided affordable housing and human services consultation, specializing in the development of housing programs and policies for persons with disabilities, including homeless persons with disabilities.

Robyn I. Stone, Ph.D., a noted researcher and internationally recognized authority on long-term care and aging policy, is the senior vice president for research at LeadingAge and the executive director of the LeadingAge Center for Applied Research. She has held senior research and policy positions in both the U.S. government and the private sector. She was a political appointee in the Clinton administration, serving in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as the deputy assistant secretary for disability, aging and long-term care policy and the assistant secretary for aging. Dr. Stone is a distinguished speaker and has been published widely in the areas of long-term care policy and quality, chronic care for people with disabilities, aging services workforce development, low-income senior housing, and family caregiving. She serves on numerous provider and nonprofit boards that focus on aging issues. Dr. Stone is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and the National Academy of Social Insurance. She was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2014.

Sarah L. Szanton, Ph.D., M.S.N., is an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing with a joint appointment in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She tests interventions to reduce health disparities among older adults. Her work particularly focuses on ways to help older adults

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×

age in place as they grow older. These include ways to improve the social determinants of health such as modifying housing and improving access to food. Dr. Szanton completed undergraduate work in African-American Studies at Harvard University and earned a bachelor’s degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in 1993. She holds a nurse practitioner master’s degree from the University of Maryland and a doctorate from Johns Hopkins University. She is the associate director for policy at the Center for Innovative Care in Aging at Johns Hopkins as well as core faculty at the Center on Aging and Health at the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, adjunct faculty with the Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy, and adjunct faculty at Arizona State University. She has been by funded by AARP Foundation, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Innovation Center, the Hillman Foundation, The John A. Hartford Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Patricia Tedesco is the coordinator of the Home Access Program at the Vermont Center for Independent Living (VCIL). VCIL, established in 1979, is a statewide nonprofit organization directed and staffed by individuals with disabilities which works to promote the dignity, independence, and civil rights of Vermonters with disabilities. The Home Access Program has been in place for 33 years. Ms. Tedesco joined the VCIL staff 5 years ago and has been the Home Access Program coordinator since 2014. Responsible for overseeing access modifications for Vermonters with disabilities, Ms. Tedesco works with access consultants and independent contractors statewide who receive training in the Americans with Disabilities Act specifications. She has established relationships with other nonprofit organizations, Medicaid programs, and the five NeighborWorks organizations in Vermont to secure leverage funding. The modifications, primarily installing ramps and accessible bathrooms, support Vermonters to stay in their homes and communities and thus stay out of institutional settings. By aging in place, members of this vulnerable population, often living in rural areas of the state, have better access to social opportunities and medical care and can therefore live a more engaged life. Ms. Tedesco is a member of the Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition and the National Council on Independent Living. Prior to working in the field of human services and advocacy, Ms. Tedesco successfully operated a photography business for 23 years. In addition to numerous awards for her photography, Ms. Tedesco was awarded the Young Careerist Award by the State of Vermont’s Business and Professional Women’s organization. She earned a business degree from Endicott College and a degree in liberal studies from the State University of New York at Brockport.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×

Uchenna S. Uchendu, M.D., was appointed as the chief officer for health equity at the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) within the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs in 2013. In this role, Dr. Uchendu is championing the advancement of health equity and the reduction of health disparities for all, especially vulnerable populations based on racial or ethnic group; religion; socioeconomic status; gender; age; mental health; cognitive, sensory, or physical disability; sexual orientation; geographic location; military era or other characteristics historically linked to discrimination or exclusion. Dr. Uchendu launched and steered the VHA Health Equity Coalition to deliver the first VHA Health Equity Action Plan in record time and is leading the charge for the deployment. She represents VHA and serves as liaison to other governmental and nongovernmental organizations working to achieve health equity. Dr. Uchendu is a general internist who has practiced in multiple settings. She is a member of the American College of Physicians and the American Association for Physician Leaders.

Bryce Ward, Ph.D., is a associate director and the director of health care research at the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the University of Montana. Dr. Ward holds a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University and a bachelor’s degree in economics and history from the University of Oregon. He works across a wide variety of topics within the broad areas of econometric analysis and applied microeconomics, including urban and regional economics, labor economics, health economics, public finance, and environmental and natural resource economics. Recently, with collaborators at the University of Montana’s Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities, Dr. Ward has focused on understanding the relationships between housing, the environment, health, and participation for people with disabilities.

Katina Washington is a program analyst in the Grants and New Funding Branch within the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Office of Multifamily, Office of Asset Management and Portfolio Oversight, Assisted Housing Oversight Division. In this position, she serves as the program lead for the Section 811 Project Rental Assistance (811 PRA) program and manages the implementation of the 811 PRA program. Ms. Washington has more than 8 years of federal grants management experience previously serving as the lead for the Assisted Living Conversion Program. She has also has experience with working on policy matters within multifamily housing assisted programs. Prior to HUD, Ms. Washington worked in program administration and adolescent health care programs for Prince Georges County in Maryland. Ms. Washington received a B.S. in business administration from Bowie State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×
Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×
Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×
Page 90
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×
Page 91
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×
Page 92
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×
Page 93
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Reactors." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Developing Affordable and Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24787.
×
Page 94
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Accessible and affordable housing can enable community living, maximize independence, and promote health for vulnerable populations. However, the United States faces a shortage of affordable and accessible housing for low-income older adults and individuals living with disabilities. This shortage is expected to grow over the coming years given the population shifts leading to greater numbers of older adults and of individuals living with disabilities.

Housing is a social determinant of health and has direct effects on health outcomes, but this relationship has not been thoroughly investigated. In December 2016, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a public workshop to better understand the importance of affordable and accessible housing for older adults and people with disabilities, the barriers to providing this housing, the design principles for making housing accessible for these individuals, and the features of programs and policies that successfully provide affordable and accessible housing that supports community living for older adults and people with disabilities. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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