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Page 99
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Use and Potential Impacts of AFFF Containing PFASs at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24800.
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Page 99
Page 100
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Use and Potential Impacts of AFFF Containing PFASs at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24800.
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Page 100

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99 Bunded A type of secondary containment around storage “where potentially polluting substances are handled, processed or stored, for the purposes of containing any unintended escape of material from that area until such time as remedial action can be taken” (Wikipedia). Category A Airport FAA ARFF Category airport that serves aircraft less than 90 feet in length. Category B Airport FAA ARFF Category airport that serves aircraft at least 90 feet but less than 126 feet in length. Category C Airport FAA ARFF Category airport that serves aircraft at least 126 feet but less than 159 feet in length. Category D Airport FAA ARFF Category airport that serves aircraft at least 159 feet but less than 200 feet in length. Category E Airport FAA ARFF Category airport that serves aircraft at least 200 feet in length. Class B Fire Fires whose fuel is flammable or combustible liquid or gas (e.g., gasoline, diesel fuel, petroleum oil, paint, propane, butane). Designated Airport Per Transport Canada, an airport at which the total of the number of passengers that are enplaned and the number of passengers that are deplaned is more than 180,000 per year. Exposure Pathway Pathway through which receptor(s) would be exposed to contaminants of concern. Fluorotelomer Fluorocarbon-based oligomers, or telomers, synthesized by telo- merisation. Hydrophilic A compound that is polar, that is attracted to water. Hydrophobic A compound that is non-polar, that is not attracted to water. Long-chain Perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) with eight carbons and greater (i.e., with seven or more perfluorinated carbons); perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFSAs) with six carbons and greater (i.e., with six or more perfluorinated carbons). Oleophobic A compound that is repelled from oil. Participating Airport In Canada, an airport, other than a designated airport, for which a critical category for firefighting is specified in the Canada Flight Supplement (Transport Canada). Perfluorinated The replacement of all hydrogens by fluorine in the aliphatic chain structure. Polyfluorinated The replacement of most hydrogens by fluorine in the aliphatic chain structure. Glossary

100 Use and Potential Impacts of AFFF Containing PFASs at Airports Receptor A human or ecological receptor that would be exposed to the contaminant of concern. Short-chain Perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) with less than eight carbons and perfluoroalkyl sulphonates (PFSAs) with less than six carbon molecules. Source A chemical found at such concentration to be of potential concern to human health or the environment. Surfactant A substance that tends to reduce the surface tension of a liquid in which it is dissolved.

Next: Appendix A - Survey Methodology and Findings »
Use and Potential Impacts of AFFF Containing PFASs at Airports Get This Book
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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 173: Use and Potential Impacts of AFFF Containing PFASs at Airports explores the potential environmental and health impacts of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) typically found in aqueous film-forming foams (AFFFs). The report describes methods that can be used to identify areas of potential concern at an airport and ways to implement management and remediation practices.

To help airports identify areas of potential environmental concern, the research team developed the Managing AFFF and PFASs at Airports (MAPA) Screening Tool. The MAPA Screening Tool is available in two versions: one for running in Microsoft Excel 2010 and the other, a version called the compatibility version, that can be run in Microsoft Excel 97 to 2003, or 2007.

Disclaimer - This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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