National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: VIRTUAL INSTITUTIONS
Suggested Citation:"IMPLEMENTATION OPTIONS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Report Series: Committee on Solar and Space Physics: Heliophysics Science Centers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24803.
×

FINDING: Programs such as the PFC and NAI allow the proposers to define the science objectives, methods, and metrics that together justify the creation of a center. The NASA Heliophysics Explorer program similarly gives proposers the freedom to design the best approach to achieve broadly defined science goals.

CONCLUSION: Transformative HSC outcomes are best achieved by open competition, with selection based on the significance of the proposed science topics, alignment with NASA and NSF goals, compelling justification for a center approach, and a realistic implementation plan likely to achieve the project objectives.

IMPLEMENTATION OPTIONS

The PFC and NAI programs’ overall structure and management styles provide two different models that NASA Heliophysics may consider as options for the implementation of the HSCs. Primary differences are the requirements for proposer types and for collaborations. The PFC program allows only academic institutions to propose—consistent with NSF’s mission—and it encourages but does not require collaborations between institutions if one location has sufficient multidisciplinarity to achieve the PFC’s objectives. The NAI allows proposers from multiple types of organizations, and although the NAI does not require it, there is much stronger encouragement for broad collaborations across multiple organizations within one team. PFC institutes operate essentially independently from each other with relatively little overhead management of the program. On the other hand, the NAI has a central management structure that represents all of the teams as a large distributed consortium. The NAI management coordinates and integrates the work of teams and provides collaborative tools (e.g., high-definition video conferencing hardware) so that all of the teams’ members can participate in virtual activities that would otherwise be prohibited by the travel complications of so large a group. Central coordination facilitates the sharing of successes, concerns, best practices, and lessons learned to the benefit of concurrent and subsequent teams, as well as to the larger scientific community.

The decadal survey described an HSC program where centers would “consist of multidisciplinary teams with two to three primary institutions,” and resources would “be focused on the core institutions to avoid spreading the resources too broadly and to achieve a focused investigation of the topic.”43 This description is more similar to the PFC management structure. However, the NAI has demonstrated the value of an intensely collaborative environment. A more virtual model similar to that of the NAI, with a small management team to facilitate increased collaboration, is an option not ruled out by the decadal survey recommendation.

HSCs could provide timely opportunities for a “whole greater than the sum of its parts” approach to capitalizing on recent dramatic progress in computational techniques and theoretical understanding and spectacular new observations. The committee’s intention with this report is to provide clarity on the issue of HSC uniqueness from other research programs and to describe some best practices and viable options for the creation of HSCs as an augmentation to existing NSF Geospace and NASA Heliophysics research programs.

___________________

43 NRC, 2013, Solar and Space Physics, p. 87.

Suggested Citation:"IMPLEMENTATION OPTIONS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Report Series: Committee on Solar and Space Physics: Heliophysics Science Centers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24803.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"IMPLEMENTATION OPTIONS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Report Series: Committee on Solar and Space Physics: Heliophysics Science Centers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24803.
×
Page 11
Suggested Citation:"IMPLEMENTATION OPTIONS." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Report Series: Committee on Solar and Space Physics: Heliophysics Science Centers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24803.
×
Page 12
Report Series: Committee on Solar and Space Physics: Heliophysics Science Centers Get This Book
×
Buy Ebook | $4.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The newly constituted Committee on Solar and Space Physics (CSSP) has been tasked with monitoring the progress of recommendations from the 2013 decadal survey Solar and Space Physics: A Science for a Technological Society. The committee held its first meeting as part of Space Science Week in Washington, D.C., on March 28-30, 2017. In advance of the meeting, and in response to discussions with the leadership of the Heliophysics Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Geospace Section of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Science, the committee identified the decadal survey’s recommendation to create NASA-NSF heliophysics science centers (HSCs) as a timely topic for discussion. This report provides a set of options for NASA and NSF to consider for the creation of HSCs, including how to make the HSCs unique from other research elements and strategies for implementation.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!