National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Practice 13: Coordination and Collaboration with Other Statistical Agencies
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

References for Part III

All URL addresses valid as of April 2017. Please note that, as of February 2017, U.S. Office of Management and Budget documents previously on the main whitehouse.gov site were relocated to an archived site. Wherever possible, a citation is provided to a stable site such as federalregister.gov.

American Association for Public Opinion Research (2015). AAPOR Code of Professional Ethics and Practices. Revised 11/30/2015. Oakbrook Terrace, IL: American Association for Public Opinion Research. Available: https://www.aapor.org/Standards-Ethics/AAPOR-Code-of-Ethics.aspx.

American Statistical Association (2016). Ethical Guidelines for Statistical Practice. Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association. Available: http://www.amstat.org/ASA/Your-Career/Ethical-Guidelines-for-Statistical-Practice.aspx.

Biemer, P., D. Trewin, H. Bergdahl, and J. Lilli (2014). A system for managing the quality of official statistics. Journal of Official Statistics 30(3), 381–442. Available: https://doi.org/10.2478/jos-2014-0022.

Brackstone, G. (1999). Managing data quality in a statistical agency. Survey Methodology 25(2), 139–149. Available: https://unstats.un.org/unsd/dnss/docViewer.aspx?docID=194.

Bradburn, N. M. and C. J. E. Fuqua (2010). Indicators and the federal statistical system: An essential but fraught partnership. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 630, 89–108.

Brick, J. M. and D. Williams (2013). Explaining rising nonresponse rates in cross-sectional surveys. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 645(1), 36–59. Available: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0002716212456834.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

Bureau of Transportation Statistics (2005). BTS Statistical Standards Manual. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Transportation. Available: https://www.rita.dot.gov/bts/sites/rita.dot.gov.bts/files/subject_areas/statistical_policy_and_research/bts_statistical_standards_manual/index.html.

Chakrabarty, R. and G. Torres (1996). The American Housing Survey—A Quality Profile. Current Housing Reports No. H121/95-1. Office of Policy Development and Research, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available: https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/programs-surveys/ahs/publications/h12195-1.pdf.

Citro, C. F. (2014). From multiple modes for surveys to multiple data sources for estimates. Survey Methodology 40(2), 137–161. Available: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/12-001-x/2014002/article/14128-eng.htm.

Citro, C. F. (2016). The US federal statistical system’s past, present, and future. Annual Review of Statistics and Its Application 3(1), 347–373. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-statistics-041715-033405.

Daas, P. J. H., S. J. L. Ossen, M. Tennekes, and J. M. S. Burger (2012). Evaluation and Visualization of the Quality of Administrative Records Used for Statistics. Paper for the European Conference on Quality in Official Statistics, Athens, Greece. Department of Methodology and Development. The Hague: Statistics Netherlands. Available: http://www.pietdaas.nl/beta/pubs/pubs/Q2012_Session23_paper.pdf.

de Leeuw, E. and W. de Heer (2002). Trends in household survey nonresponse: A longitudinal and international comparison. Pp. 41–54 in Survey Nonresponse. R.M. Groves, D.A. Dillman, J.L. Eltinge, and R.J.A. Little, eds. New York: John Wiley & Sons. Available: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/44161946_Trends_in_Household_Survey_Nonresponse_A_Longitudinal_and_International_Comparison.

Doyle, P., J. Lane, J. Theeuwes, and L. Zayatz (2001). Confidentiality, Disclosure, and Data Access: Theory and Practical Applications for Statistical Agencies. North Holland, Netherlands: Elsevier Science.

Duncan, J. W. and W. C. Shelton (1978). Revolution in United States Statistics, 1926–1976. Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards, U.S. Department of Commerce. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/007886111/Home.

Energy Information Administration (1996). Residential Energy Consumption Survey Quality Profile. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Energy. Available: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc666723/.

Eurostat (2000). Assessment of the Quality in Statistics. Working Group on Assessment of Quality in Statistics, Luxembourg, April 4–5, 2000. Doc. Eurostat/A4/Quality/00/General/Standard. Luxembourg: Eurostat.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

Available: http://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/stats/documents/2000/11/metis/crp.3.e.pdf.

Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology (1978). An Error Profile: Employment as Measured by the Current Population Survey. Statistical Policy Working Paper 3 (NTIS PB86-214269/AS). Subcommittee on Nonsampling Errors. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Commerce. Available: https://s3.amazonaws.com/sitesusa/wp-content/uploads/sites/242/2014/04/spwp3.pdf.

Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology (2001). Measuring and Reporting Sources of Error in Surveys. Statistical Policy Working Paper 31 (NTIS PB2001104329). Subcommittee on Measuring and Reporting the Quality of Survey Data. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Management and Budget. Available: https://s3.amazonaws.com/sitesusa/wp-content/uploads/sites/242/2014/04/spwp31.pdf.

Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology (2005). Report on Statistical Disclosure Limitation Methodology. Statistical Policy Working Paper 22. Originally prepared in 1994 by Subcommittee on Disclosure Limitation Methodology. Revised by Confidentiality and Data Access Committee. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Management and Budget. Available: https://s3.amazonaws.com/sitesusa/wp-content/uploads/sites/242/2014/04/spwp22.pdf.

Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology (2009). Profiles in Success of Statistical Uses of Administrative Data. Statistical Policy Working Paper 45. Subcommittee on Statistical Uses Of Administrative Records. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Management and Budget. Available: https://s3.amazonaws.com/sitesusa/wp-content/uploads/sites/242/2014/04/StatisticalUsesofARData.pdf.

Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology (2013). Data Quality Assessment Tool for Administrative Data. Statistical Policy Working Paper 46. Subcommittee on Statistical Uses of Administrative Records. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Management and Budget. Available: https://s3.amazonaws.com/sitesusa/wp-content/uploads/sites/242/2014/04/DataQualityAssessmentTool.pdf.

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics (2016). Older Americans 2016: Key Indicators of Well-Being. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available: https://agingstats.gov/docs/LatestReport/Older-Americans-2016Key-Indicators-of-WellBeing.pdf.

Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics (2016). America’s Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2016. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available: https://www.childstats.gov/pdf/ac2016/ac_16.pdf.

Gates, G. W. (2012). Confidentiality. Pp. 93–95 in Encyclopedia of the U.S. Census: From the Constitution to the American Community Survey (ACS) (2nd edition). M.J. Anderson, C.F. Citro, and J.J. Salvo, eds. Washington, DC: CQ Press.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

Gillingham, R. and W. Lane (1982). Changing the treatment of shelter costs for homeowners in the CPI. Monthly Labor Review 105(6), 9–14. Available: https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/1982/06/art2full.pdf.

Hendriks, C. (2012). Input data quality in register based statistics: The Norwegian experience. In Proceedings of the 2012 Joint Statistical Meetings (San Diego, CA), Alexandria, VA, pp. 1472–1480. American Statistical Association.

Hillygus, D. S., N. H. Nie, K. Prewitt, and H. Pals (2006). The Hard Count: The Political and Social Challenges of Census Mobilization. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. Available: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7758/9781610442886.

Interagency Technical Working Group on Developing a Supplemental Poverty Measure (2010). Observations from the Interagency Technical Working Group on Developing a Supplemental Poverty Measure. Available: https://www.census.gov/hhes/povmeas/methodology/supplemental/research/SPM_TWGObservations.pdf.

International Statistical Institute (2010). Declaration on Professional Ethics. Voorburg, The Netherlands: International Statistical Institute. Available: https://www.isiweb.org/index.php/news-from-isi/296-declarationprofessionalethics-2010uk.

Kalton, G., M. Winglee, S. Krawchuk, and D. Levine (2000). Quality Profile for SASS Rounds 1–3: 1987–1995, Aspects of the Quality of Data in the Schools and Staffing Surveys (SASS). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education. Available: https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2000308.

Lohr, S. and T. Raghunathan (2017). Combining survey data with other data sources. Statistical Science 32(3), 293–312. Available: https://projecteuclid.org/euclid.ss/1494489817.

Manski, C. F. (2015). Communicating uncertainty in official economic statistics: An appraisal fifty years after Morgenstern. Journal of Economic Literature 53(3), 631–653. Available: https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/jel.53.3.631.

Martin, M. E. (1981). Statistical practice in bureaucracies. Journal of the American Statistical Association 76(373), 1–8. Available: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01621459.1981.10477593.

Muth, M. K., M. Sweitzer, D. Brown, K. Capogrossi, S. Karns, D. Levin, A. Okrent, P. Siegel, and C. Zhen (2016). Understanding IRI Household-Based and Store-Based Scanner Data. Technical Bulletin No. TB-1942. Washington, DC: Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Available: https://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/pub-details/?pubid=47636.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (2016). Reducing Respondent Burden in the American Community Survey: Proceedings of a Workshop. T.J. Plewes, rapporteur. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/23639.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (2017a). Advancing Concepts and Models for Measuring Innovation: Proceedings of a Workshop. C.D. Mackie, rapporteur. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/23640.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (2017b). Innovations in Federal Statistics Using New Data Sources While Respecting Privacy. Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods, R.M. Groves and B.A. Harris-Kojetin, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/24652.

National Center for Education Statistics (2012). Statistical Standards of the National Center for Education Statistics. First issued in 1987, revised in 1992 and 2002, and updated in 2012. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education. Available: https://nces.ed.gov/statprog/2012/.

National Institute of Statistical Sciences (2017). Integrity, Independence and Innovation: The Future of NCES. Report of an Expert Panel. Washington, DC: National Institute of Statistical Sciences. Available: https://niss.org/news/niss-panel-report-released-integrity-independence-and-innovation-future-nces.

National Research Council (1976). Setting Statistical Priorities. Panel on Methodology for Statistical Priorities, Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available from the Committee on National Statistics.

National Research Council (1979). Privacy and Confidentiality as Factors in Survey Nonresponse. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/19845.

National Research Council (1984). Cognitive Aspects of Survey Methodology: Building a Bridge Between Disciplines. Report of the Advanced Research Seminar on Cognitive Aspects of Survey Methodology, T.B. Jabine, M.L. Straf, J.M. Tanur, and R. Tourangeau, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/930.

National Research Council (1985). Sharing Research Data. Committee on National Statistics, S.E. Fienberg, M.E. Martin, and M.L. Straf, eds. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/2033.

National Research Council (1986). Creating a Center for Education Statistics: A Time for Action. Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Education Statistics, D.B. Levine, ed. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/19230.

National Research Council (1991a). Improving Information for Social Policy Decisions: The Uses of Microsimulation. Volume I: Review and Recommendations. Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs, C.F. Citro and E.A. Hanushek, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/1835.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

National Research Council (1991b). Improving Information for Social Policy Decisions: The Uses of Microsimulation. Volume II: Technical Papers. Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs, C.F. Citro and E.A. Hanushek, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/1853.

National Research Council (1993a). The Future of the Survey of Income and Program Participation. Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, C.F. Citro and G. Kalton, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/2072.

National Research Council (1993b). Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics. Panel on Confidentiality and Data Access, G.T. Duncan, T.B. Jabine, and V.A. de Wolf, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/2122.

National Research Council (1995). Measuring Poverty—A New Approach. Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, C.F. Citro and R.T. Michael, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/4759.

National Research Council (1997a). Assessing Policies for Retirement Income: Needs for Data, Research, and Models. Panel on Retirement Income Modeling, C.F. Citro and E.A. Hanushek, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/5420.

National Research Council (1997b). The Bureau of Transportation Statistics: Priorities for the Future. Panel on Statistical Programs and Practices of the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, C.F. Citro and J.L. Norwood, eds. Committee on National Statistics and Transportation Research Board. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/5809.

National Research Council (2000a). Improving Access to and Confidentiality of Research Data: Report of a Workshop. C.M. Mackie and N. Bradburn, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/9958.

National Research Council (2000b). Measuring the Science and Engineering Enterprise: Priorities for the Division of Science Resource Studies. Committee to Assess the Portfolio of the Division of Science Resources Studies of NSF, Committee on National Statistics and Office of Scientific and Engineering Personnel. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/9775.

National Research Council (2000c). Small-Area Estimates of School-Age Children in Poverty: Evaluation of Current Methodology. Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas, C.F. Citro and G. Kalton, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/6427.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

National Research Council (2000d). Small-Area Income and Poverty Estimates: Priorities for 2000 and Beyond. Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas, C.F. Citro and G. Kalton, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/9957.

National Research Council (2001a). Cells and Surveys: Should Biological Measures Be Included in Social Science Research? C.E. Finch, J.W. Vaupel, and K. Kinsella, eds. Committee on Population. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/9995.

National Research Council (2001b). Evaluating Welfare Reform in an Era of Transition. Panel on Data and Methods for Measuring the Effects of Changes in Social Welfare Programs, R.A. Moffitt and M. Ver Ploeg, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/10020.

National Research Council (2002). At What Price? Conceptualizing and Measuring Cost-of-Living and Price Indexes. Panel on Conceptual, Measurement, and Other Statistical Issues in Developing Cost-of-Living Indexes, C. Schultze and C.M. Mackie, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/10131.

National Research Council (2003a). Estimating Eligibility and Participation for the WIC Program: Final Report. Panel to Evaluate the USDA’s Methodology for Estimating Eligibility and Participation for the WIC Program, M. Ver Ploeg and D.M. Betson, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/10804.

National Research Council (2003b). Protecting Participants and Facilitating Social and Behavioral Sciences Research. Panel on Institutional Review Boards, Surveys, and Social Science Research, C.F. Citro, D.R. Ilgen, and C.B. Marrett, eds. Committee on National Statistics and Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/10638.

National Research Council (2003c). Survey Automation: Report and Workshop Proceedings. Oversight Committee for the Workshop on Survey Automation, D.L. Cork, M.L. Cohen, R.M. Groves, and W. Kalsbeek, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/10695.

National Research Council (2004a). The 2000 Census: Counting Under Adversity. Panel to Review the 2000 Census, C.F. Citro, D.L. Cork, and J.L. Norwood, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/10907.

National Research Council (2004b). Eliminating Health Disparities: Measurement and Data Needs. Panel on DHHS Collection of Race and Ethnic Data, M. Ver Ploeg and E. Perrin, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/10979.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

National Research Council (2004c). Measuring Research and Development Expenditures in the U.S. Economy. Panel on Research and Development Statistics at the National Science Foundation, L.D. Brown, T.J. Plewes, and M.A. Gerstein, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/11111.

National Research Council (2004d). Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Panel on Research on Future Census Methods, D.L. Cork, M.L. Cohen, and B.F. King, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/10959.

National Research Council (2005a). Beyond the Market: Designing Nonmarket Accounts for the United States. Panel to Study the Design of Nonmarket Accounts, K.G. Abraham and C.M. Mackie, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/11181.

National Research Council (2005b). Expanding Access to Research Data: Reconciling Risks and Opportunities. Panel on Data Access for Research Purposes, Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/11434.

National Research Council (2005c). Experimental Poverty Measures: Summary of a Workshop. J. Iceland, rapporteur. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/11166.

National Research Council (2006a). Food Insecurity and Hunger in the United States: An Assessment of the Measure. Panel to Review USDA’s Measurement of Food Insecurity and Hunger, G.S. Wunderlich and J.L. Norwood, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/11578.

National Research Council (2006b). Improving Business Statistics Through Interagency Data Sharing: Summary of a Workshop. C. Kuebler and C.M. Mackie, rapporteurs. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/11738.

National Research Council (2006c). Once, Only Once, and in the Right Place: Residence Rules in the Decennial Census. Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, D.L. Cork and P.R. Voss, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/11727.

National Research Council (2007a). Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future. Panel on Measuring Business Formation, Dynamics, and Performance, J. Haltiwanger, L.M. Lynch, and C.M. Mackie, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/11844.

National Research Council (2007b). Using the American Community Survey: Benefits and Challenges. Panel on the Functionality and Usability of Data from the

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

American Community Survey, C.F. Citro and G. Kalton, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/11901.

National Research Council (2008a). Protecting Individual Privacy in the Struggle Against Terrorists—A Framework for Program Assessment. Committee on Technical and Privacy Dimensions of Information for Terrorism Prevention and Other National Goals, Committee on Law and Justice, Committee on National Statistics, and Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12452.

National Research Council (2008b). Using the American Community Survey for the National Science Foundation’s Science and Engineering Workforce Statistics Program. Panel on Assessing the Benefits of the American Community Survey for the NSF Division of Science Resources Statistics, Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12244.

National Research Council (2009a). Ensuring the Quality, Credibility, and Relevance of U.S. Justice Statistics. Panel to Review the Programs of the Bureau of Justice Statistics, R.M. Groves and D.L. Cork, eds. Committee on National Statistics and Committee on Law and Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12671.

National Research Council (2009b). Improving the Measurement of Late-Life Disability in Population Surveys: Beyond ADLs and IADLs, Summary of a Workshop. G.S. Wunderlich, rapporteur. Committee on National Statistics and Committee on Population. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12740.

National Research Council (2009c). Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency, Fourth Edition. Committee on National Statistics, C.F. Citro, M.E. Martin, and M.L. Straf, eds. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12564.

National Research Council (2009d). Protecting Student Records and Facilitating Education Research: A Workshop Summary. M. Hilton, rapporteur. Committee on National Statistics and Center for Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12514.

National Research Council (2009e). Reengineering the Survey of Income and Program Participation. Panel on the Census Bureau’s Reengineered Survey of Income and Program Participation, C.F. Citro and J.K. Scholz, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12715.

National Research Council (2010a). Accounting for Health and Health Care: Approaches to Measuring the Sources and Costs of Their Improvement. Panel to Advance a Research Program on the Design of National Health Accounts, Committee on

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12938.

National Research Council (2010b). Conducting Biosocial Surveys: Collecting, Storing, Accessing, and Protecting Biospecimens and Biodata. Panel on Collecting, Storing, Accessing, and Protecting Biological Specimens and Biodata in Social Surveys, R.M. Hauser, M. Weinstein, R. Pool, and B. Cohen, eds. Committee on National Statistics and Committee on Population. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12942.

National Research Council (2010c). Envisioning the 2020 Census. Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments, L.D. Brown, M.L. Cohen, D.L. Cork, and C.F. Citro, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12865.

National Research Council (2010d). Improving Health Care Cost Projections for the Medical Population: Summary of a Workshop. G. Wunderlich, rapporteur. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12985.

National Research Council (2010e). The Prevention and Treatment of Missing Data in Clinical Trials. Panel on Handling Missing Data in Clinical Trials, Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12955.

National Research Council (2010f). Protecting and Accessing Data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates: A Workshop Summary. T.J. Plewes, rapporteur. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/12797.

National Research Council (2012). Communicating Science and Engineering Data in the Information Age. Panel on Communicating National Science Foundation Science and Engineering Information to Data Users, Committee on National Statistics and Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/13282.

National Research Council (2013a). Nonresponse in Social Science Surveys: A Research Agenda. Panel on a Research Agenda for the Future of Social Science Data Collection, R. Tourangeau and T.J. Plewes, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/18293.

National Research Council (2013b). Subjective Well Being: Measuring Happiness, Suffering, and Other Dimensions of Experience. Panel on Measuring Subjective Well-Being in a Policy-Relevant Framework, A.A. Stone and C.M. Mackie, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/18548.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

National Research Council (2014a). Capturing Change in Science, Technology, and Innovation: Improving Indicators to Inform Policy. Panel on Developing Science, Technology, and Innovation Indicators for the Future, R.E. Litan, A.W. Wyckoff, and K.H. Fealing, eds. Committee on National Statistics and Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/18606.

National Research Council (2014b). Civic Engagement and Social Cohesion: Measuring Dimensions of Social Capital to Inform Policy. Panel on Measuring Social and Civic Engagement and Social Cohesion in Surveys, K. Prewitt, C.D. Mackie, and H. Habermann, eds. Committee on National Statistics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/18831.

National Research Council (2014c). Proposed Revisions to the Common Rule for the Protection of Human Subjects in the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Committee on Revisions to the Common Rule for the Protection of Human Subjects in Research in the Behavioral and Social Sciences, Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences, Committee on National Statistics, and Committee on Population. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/18614.

National Research Council and Institute of Medicine (2012). Medical Care Economic Risk: Measuring Financial Vulnerability from Spending on Medical Care. Panel on Measuring Medical Care Risk in Conjunction with the New Supplemental Poverty Income Measure, M.J. O’Grady and G.S. Wunderlich, eds. Committee on National Statistics and Board on Health Care Services. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Available: https://doi.org/10.17226/13525.

Norwood, J. L. (1975). Should those who produce statistics analyze them? How far should analysis go? An American view. Bulletin of the International Statistical Institute [Proceedings of the 40th Session] 46, 420–432.

Norwood, J. L. (1995). Organizing to Count: Change in the Federal Statistical System. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute Press.

Statistics Canada (2009). Statistics Canada Quality Guidelines (5th ed.). Ottawa: Statistics Canada. Available: https://unstats.un.org/unsd/dnss/docs-nqaf/Canada-12-539-x2009001-eng.pdf.

Triplett, J. (1991). The federal statistical system’s response to emerging data needs. Journal of Economic and Social Measurement 17(3–4), 155–201. Available: http://content.iosPress.com/articles/journal-of-economic-and-social-measurement/jem17-3-4-03.

UNECE High-Level Group for the Modernisation of Official Statistics (2013, December). Generic statistical business process model (GSBPM), version 5.0. Maintained by Modernisation Committee on Standards. Available: http://www1.unece.org/stat/platform/display/metis/The+Generic+Statistical+Business+Process+Model.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

United Kingdom Office for National Statistics (2007). Guidelines for Measuring Statistical Quality. London: Office for National Statistics. Available: https://unstats.un.org/unsd/dnss/docs-nqaf/UK-Guidelines_Subject.pdf.

U.S. Census Bureau (1998). Survey of Income and Program Participation Quality Profile 1998 (3rd ed.). SIPP Working Paper No. 230. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Commerce. Available: https://www.census.gov/library/working-papers/1998/demo/SEHSD-WP1998-11.html.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget (1985). Statistical Policy Directive No. 3: Compilation, release, and evaluation of principal federal economic indicators. 50 Federal Register 38932 (September 25, 1985). Available: https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/omb/assets/omb/inforeg/statpolicy/dir_3_fr_09251985.pdf.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget (2008). Statistical Policy Directive No. 4: Release and dissemination of statistical products produced by federal statistical agencies. 73 Federal Register 12625 (March 7, 2008). Available: https://www.federalregister.gov/d/E8-4570.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget (2014a). Guidance for providing and using administrative data for statistical purposes. OMB Memorandum M-14-06. Available: https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/omb/memoranda/2014/m-14-06.pdf.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget (2014b). Statistical Policy Directive No. 1: Fundamental responsibilities of federal statistical agencies and recognized statistical units. 79 Federal Register 71609 (December 2, 2014). Available: https://www.federalregister.gov/d/2014-28326.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget (2016a). Statistical Policy Directive No. 2: Standards and guidelines for statistical surveys; Addendum: Standards and guidelines for cognitive interviews. 81 Federal Register 70586 (October 12, 2006). Available: https://www.federalregister.gov/d/2016-24607.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget (2016b, May 4). Supplemental guidance on the implementation of M-15-14 “Management and oversight of federal information technology”—Applying FITARA common baseline to statistical agencies and units. Memorandum from Tony Scott, Federal Chief Information Officer, and Howard Shelanski, Administrator, Office of Regulatory Affairs. Available: https://management.cio.gov/assets/docs/FITARA_Guidance_Statistical_Agencies_and_Units_OMB.pdf.

U.S. Office of Management and Budget (2017). Statistical Programs of the United States Government: Fiscal Year 2017. Statistical and Science Policy Office, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available: https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/default/files/omb/assets/information_and_regulatory_affairs/statistical-programs-2017.pdf.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 123
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 124
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 125
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 126
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 127
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 128
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 129
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 130
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 131
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 132
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 133
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 134
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 135
Suggested Citation:"References for Part III." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24810.
×
Page 136
Next: Appendixes »
Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $54.00 Buy Ebook | $43.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Publicly available statistics from government agencies that are credible, relevant, accurate, and timely are essential for policy makers, individuals, households, businesses, academic institutions, and other organizations to make informed decisions. Even more, the effective operation of a democratic system of government depends on the unhindered flow of statistical information to its citizens.

In the United States, federal statistical agencies in cabinet departments and independent agencies are the governmental units whose principal function is to compile, analyze, and disseminate information for such statistical purposes as describing population characteristics and trends, planning and monitoring programs, and conducting research and evaluation. The work of these agencies is coordinated by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. Statistical agencies may acquire information not only from surveys or censuses of people and organizations, but also from such sources as government administrative records, private-sector datasets, and Internet sources that are judged of suitable quality and relevance for statistical use. They may conduct analyses, but they do not advocate policies or take partisan positions. Statistical purposes for which they provide information relate to descriptions of groups and exclude any interest in or identification of an individual person, institution, or economic unit.

Four principles are fundamental for a federal statistical agency: relevance to policy issues, credibility among data users, trust among data providers, and independence from political and other undue external influence.Β Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency: Sixth Edition presents and comments on these principles as they’ve been impacted by changes in laws, regulations, and other aspects of the environment of federal statistical agencies over the past 4 years.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!