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Enhancing the Resilience of the Nation's Electricity System (2017)

Chapter: Appendix B: Committee Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing the Resilience of the Nation's Electricity System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24836.
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Appendix B

Committee Biographies

M. GRANGER MORGAN, Chair, is Hamerschlag University Professor of Engineering; professor, Department of Engineering and Public Policy (where he served for 38 years as the founding department head) and Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He also holds an appointment in the H. John Heinz III College of Public Policy and Management. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Society for Risk Analysis. His research addresses problems in science, technology, and public policy with a particular focus on energy, environmental systems, climate change, and risk analysis. Much of his work has involved the development and demonstration of methods to characterize and treat uncertainty in quantitative policy analysis. At Carnegie Mellon, he co-directs (with Inês Azevedo) the Center for Climate and Energy Decision Making and (with Jay Apt) the Electricity Industry Center. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, serves on several committees for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, and is a member of several domestic and international advisory committees for organizations addressing issues involving electric power, other energy issues, and the management of risks to health safety and the environment. He holds a B.A. from Harvard College (1963) where he concentrated in physics, an M.S. in astronomy and space science from Cornell University (1965), and a Ph.D. from the Department of Applied Physics and Information Sciences at the University of California, San Diego (1969).

DIONYSIOS ALIPRANTIS is an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University. Dionysios obtained his Ph.D. from Purdue University in 2003 and his Diploma in electrical and computer engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, in 1999. Prior to joining Purdue, he was an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Iowa State University. His research interests include electromagnetic energy conversion and electric machinery, power electronics, and power systems analysis. More recently, his work has focused on technologies that enable the integration of renewable energy sources in the electric power system and the electrification of transportation. He is currently serving as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion.

ANJAN BOSE is Regents Professor and Distinguished Professor of Electric Power Engineering at Washington State University. He has 50 years of experience in industry, academia, and government, as an engineer, educator, and administrator. He is also the site director of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored Power System Engineering Research Center. He served as the dean of the College of Engineering and Architecture (1998–2005) and as the director of the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (1993–1998). Prior to Washington State University, he taught at Arizona State University (1981–1993) and worked in the Energy Management Systems Division of Control Data Corporation (now Siemens), where he developed power grid control software. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and the Indian National Academy of Engineering. A fellow of the IEEE, he was the recipient of the Outstanding Power Engineering Educator Award (1994), the Third Millennium Medal (2000), and the IEEE’s Herman Halperin Electric Transmission and Distribution Award (2006). He has been recognized as a distinguished alumnus of the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (2005) and the College of Engineering at Iowa State University (1993). During 2011–2013, Bose served as senior advisor to the Department of Energy (DOE) coordinating priorities for the next-generation grid.

W. TERRY BOSTON is the former chief executive officer of PJM Interconnection, the largest power grid in North America and the largest electricity market in the world. Boston is past president of the Association of Edison Illuminating Companies and past president of GO 15, the association of the world’s largest power grid operators. He also served as a U.S. vice president of the International Council of Large

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing the Resilience of the Nation's Electricity System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24836.
×

Electric Systems and is a past chair of the North American Transmission Forum. He also was one of the eight industry experts selected to direct the North American Electric Reliability Corporation investigation of the August 2003 Northeast blackout. In 2011, Boston was honored with the Leadership in Power award from the IEEE Power and Energy Society. He also was chosen by Intelligent Utilities as one of the Top 11 Industry Movers and Shakers and led PJM to win Platts Global Energy Awards in Industry Leadership in 2010, Excellence in Electricity in 2012, and Lifetime Achievement Award in 2015. Boston is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received a B.S. in engineering from the Tennessee Technological University and an M.S. in engineering administration from the University of Tennessee.

ALLISON CLEMENTS is the president of goodgrid, LLC, based in Salt Lake City, Utah. She is the former director of the Sustainable Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Project at Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). The Project represents a coalition of clean energy-focused advocacy organizations at FERC and at the independent system operator/regional transmission organization level in pursuit of a clean, reliable, and affordable electric system. Prior to joining the FERC Project, Clements spent 3 years as NRDC’s corporate counsel while maintaining a policy practice in renewable energy deployment. Before joining NRDC, she worked as a project finance attorney at Chadbourne & Parke, LLP, as well as an energy regulatory attorney at Troutman Sanders, LLP. Clements is a 2015 Presidio Institute Cross-Sector Leadership Fellow, co-directed the Yale Law School and School of Forestry Environmental Protection Clinic (2013–2014), acted as co-chair of the Bipartisan Policy Center’s Electric Grid Initiative (2011–2013), and served as a director and treasurer of the Healthy Building Network (2008–2014). She holds a B.S. in environmental policy from the University of Michigan and a J.D., with honors, from the George Washington University Law School.

JEFFERY DAGLE has been an electrical engineer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since 1989. He currently manages several projects in the areas of transmission reliability and security, including the North American SynchroPhasor Initiative and cybersecurity reviews for the DOE Smart Grid Investment Grants and Smart Grid Demonstration Projects. He is a senior member of the IEEE and the National Society of Professional Engineers. He received the 2001 Tri-City Engineer of the Year award by the Washington Society of Professional Engineers, led the data requests and management task for the U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force investigation of the August 14, 2003, blackout, supported the DOE Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Division with on-site assessments in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina in fall 2005, and is the recipient of multiple patents including a Federal Laboratory Consortium Award in 2007 and an R&D 100 Award in 2008 for the Grid Friendly™ Appliance Controller technology. Dagle was a member of a National Infrastructure Advisory Council study group formed in 2010 to establish critical infrastructure resilience goals. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Washington State University in 1989 and 1994, respectively.

PAUL DE MARTINI is the managing director at Newport Consulting. He has more than 35 years of experience in the power industry. He is a thought leader and expert in the global electricity industry, providing guidance to utilities, policy makers, and new entrants. Previously, De Martini held several executive positions focused on strategy, policy, and technology development, including chief technology and strategy officer for Cisco’s Energy Networks Business and vice president of Advanced Technology at Southern California Edison. De Martini has an M.B.A. from the University of Southern California and a B.S. in applied economics from the University of San Francisco. He is a visiting scholar at the California Institute of Technology.

JEANNE FOX is an adjunct professor at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and at Rutgers University School of Arts and Sciences. She served as a commissioner of the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities from January 2002 until September 2014 and was its president and a member of the Governor’s cabinet from January 2002 to January 2010. The New Jersey Board of Public Utilities has regulatory jurisdiction over telephone, electric, gas, water, wastewater, and cable television companies and works to ensure that consumers have proper service at reasonable rates. Commissioner Fox is currently a member of the National Petroleum Council and its Emergency Preparedness Committee, Carnegie Mellon University’s Advisory Board for its Center for Climate Energy Decision Making, Rutgers University’s Energy Institute Advisory Board, and GRID Alternatives Tri-State Board of Directors. Fox was active with the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners as a member of the Board of Directors (2003–2014), Subcommittee on Education and Research, Subcommittee on Utility Market Access, Committee on Energy Resources and Environment (chair, vice chair), and Committee on Critical Infrastructure (vice chair). She is currently a member of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners’ Emeritus. Fox served as Region 2 administrator of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (1994–2001) and as commissioner and deputy commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy (1991–1994). Starting at the Board of Public Utilities in 1981 as a regulatory officer, she was promoted to Solid Waste Division deputy director (1985), Water Division director (1987), and chief of staff (1990–1991). In 2001, Fox was a visiting distinguished lecturer at Rutgers University’s Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy and at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing the Resilience of the Nation's Electricity System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24836.
×

(2001–2002, 2016–2017). Fox is currently president of the associate alumnae of Douglass College and a Rutgers University trustee emerita. She is a member of the Rutgers Hall of Distinguished Alumni Award (1997) and the Douglass Society (1993) and a recipient of the Rutgers Alumni Federation Alumni Meritorious Service Award (1991) and the Loyal Sons and Daughters of Rutgers Award (2012). Fox graduated cum laude from Douglass College, Rutgers University, and received a J.D. from the Rutgers University School of Law, Camden.

ELSA GARMIRE is the former Sydney E. Junkins Professor at Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College. She received her A.B. at Harvard and her Ph.D. at M.I.T., both in physics. After postdoctoral work at Caltech, she spent 20 years at the University of Southern California, where she was eventually named William Hogue Professor of Electrical Engineering and director of the Center for Laser Studies. She came to Dartmouth in 1995 as dean of Thayer School of Engineering. In her technical field of quantum electronics, lasers, and optics, she has authored more than 250 journal papers, obtained nine patents, and been on the editorial board of five technical journals. She has supervised 30 Ph.D. theses and 14 M.S. theses. Garmire is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, on whose Governing Council she has served, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is a fellow of IEEE, the American Physical Society, and the Optical Society of America, of which she was president in 1993. In 1994, she received the Society of Women Engineers Achievement Award. Garmire has been a Fulbright senior lecturer in fiber optics and a visiting faculty member in Japan, Australia, Germany, and China. She chaired the NSF Advisory Committee on Emerging Technology and served on both the NSF Advisory Committee on Engineering and the Air Force Science Advisory Board. With her electrical engineering background and fiber-optics expertise, she has followed the growing challenges to the nation’s energy infrastructure, with particular interest in the electric grid.

RONALD E. KEYS, an independent consultant, retired from the Air Force in November 2007 after completing a career of more than 40 years. His last assignment was as Commander, Air Combat Command, the Air Force’s largest major command, consisting of more than 1,200 aircraft, 27 wings, 17 bases, and 200 operating locations worldwide with 105,000 personnel. General Keys holds a B.S. from Kansas State University and an M.B.A. from Golden Gate University. General Keys is a command pilot with more than 4,000 flying hours in fighter aircraft, including more than 300 hours of combat time. No stranger to energy challenges, General Keys first faced them operationally as a young Air Force Captain, piloting F-4s during the fuel embargo of the 1970s. Later, as director of operations for European Command, fuel and logistic supply provisioning were critical decisions during humanitarian, rescue, and combat operations across European Command’s area of responsibility including the Balkans and deep into Africa. As Commander of Allied Air Forces Southern Europe and Commander of the U.S. 16th Air Force, similar hard choices had to be made in supporting OPERATION NORTHERN WATCH in Iraq as well as for combat air patrols and resupply in the Balkans. Later, as the director of all Air Force Air, Space, and Cyber mission areas as well as operational requirements in the early 2000s, he saw the impact of energy choices on budget planning and execution as well as in training and supporting operational plans in Iraq and Afghanistan. Finally, at Air Combat Command, he faced the total challenge of organizing, training, and equipping forces at home and deployed to balance mission effectiveness with crucial energy efficiency, security, and resilience. Continuing after retirement, he has advised the U.S. Air Force on energy security strategy planning and acted as a subject matter expert during analysis of energy impacts and trade-offs in “futures” war games. As a Bipartisan Center senior advisor, he served as a technical advisor on the “Cyber Shockwave” exercise based on cyber and physical grid and internet attacks. He is a member of The Center for Climate and Security’s Advisory Board as well as their Climate and Security Working Group focused on developing policy options and encouraging dialogue and education. As chairman of the CNA Military Advisory Board on Department of Defense Energy Security and Climate Change, he is intimately familiar with the relationship of energy, military, economic, and national security and has contributed to a number of energy and climate reports, most recently concerning the vulnerability and resilience of the electric grid.

MARK McGRANAGHAN is vice president of distribution and energy utilization for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). This research area is leading the development of the next generation integrated grid while continuing to develop new innovations for designing, maintaining, and improving the existing grid. This includes research to define and develop the information and communication infrastructure that will support the integrated grid. He has been involved in resiliency research at EPRI at both the transmission and distribution levels. McGranaghan has more than 35 years of experience in the industry. He has authored more than 70 technical papers and articles on topics ranging from power quality to insulation coordination of extra-high-voltage systems. He is an IEEE fellow and, in 2014, received the Charles Proteus Steinmetz award for his expertise and dedication to power engineering standards development. He has recently been one of the industry leaders developing the standards and platforms to support the next-generation smart grid for integration of widespread distributed resources. He is a member of the executive committee of the CIGRE U.S. National Committee, vice chairman of the CIRED U.S. National Committee, and a member

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing the Resilience of the Nation's Electricity System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24836.
×

of the International Electrotechnical Commission Advisory Committee on Electricity Transmission and Distribution. McGranaghan has taught courses and seminars around the world to help support collaboration in the power industry. He is a co-author of the book Electrical Power Systems Quality, now in its third edition. McGranaghan has a B.S.E.E. from the University of Toledo and an M.B.A. from the University of Pittsburgh. In 2015, he received the Outstanding Alumni Award from the University of Toledo College of Engineering and Computer Science.

CRAIG MILLER currently serves full time as the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s chief scientist. Miller is a technologist with extensive background in the physical sciences, information technology, and systems engineering. He has developed new technology and cutting-edge systems for more than 30 years, within and for both start-up and established corporations. His particular strength is the conceptualization, tuning, and positioning of new technology products. More than 2,000 companies in the United States use systems or technology he has architected or developed. Miller’s many accomplishments deserve mention: participating in seven start-ups; serving as SAIC’s chief scientist (during which time he was granted the “Heroic Achievement in Information Technology” award from the Smithsonian Institution); and a wide experience in technical and financial media as a key investor relations expert, technologist, inventor, and analyst on behalf of diverse companies such as Proxicom, GridPoint, DiData, and Aguru Images, a high-end digital imaging company that he started. More recently, Miller has achieved a national reputation in the advanced smart grid and cybersecurity arenas.

THOMAS J. OVERBYE is a Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station Distinguished Research Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Texas A&M University. Formerly, he was the Fox Family Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where he has taught since 1991. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. His current research interests include electric power system analysis, visualization, dynamics, cybersecurity, and modeling of power system geomagnetic disturbances. Overbye is the original developer of the PowerWorld Simulator, an innovative computer program for power system analysis, education, and visualization; a co-founder of PowerWorld Corporation; and an author of Power System Analysis and Design. He was the recipient of the IEEE/Power and Energy Society Walter Fee Outstanding Young Engineer Award in 1993 and the IEEE/Power and Energy Society Outstanding Power Engineering Educator Award in 2011, and he participated in the 2003 DOE/North American Electric Reliability Corporation Blackout investigation.

WILLIAM H. SANDERS is Donald Biggar Willett Professor of Engineering and the head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Sanders’s research interests include secure and dependable computing and security and dependability metrics and evaluation, with a focus on critical infrastructures. He has published more than 270 technical papers in those areas. He served as the director and principal investigator of the DOE/Department of Homeland Security Trustworthy Cyber Infrastructure for the Power Grid Center, which is at the forefront of national efforts to make the U.S. power grid smart and resilient. He is also co-developer of three tools for assessing computer-based systems: METASAN, UltraSAN, and Möbius. Möbius and UltraSAN have been distributed widely to industry and academia; more than 1,700 licenses for the tools have been issued to universities, companies, and NASA for evaluating the performance, dependability, and security of a variety of systems. He is also a co-developer of the Network Access Policy Tool for assessing the security of networked systems; it is available commercially under the name NP-View from the start-up company Network Perception, which was cofounded by Dr. Sanders.

RICHARD E. SCHULER is a professor of economics (College of Arts and Sciences), a professor emeritus of civil and environmental engineering (College of Engineering), and a graduate school professor at Cornell University. Schuler served on the executive committee of the NSF-supported, multi-university Institute for Civil Infrastructure Systems. Previous administrative positions at Cornell have included director of the Waste Management Institute and the New York State Solid Waste Combustion Institutes (1987–1993), as associate director of the Center for the Environment (1989–1993), and director of Cornell’s Institute for Public Affairs (1995–2001), a university-wide multidisciplinary program offering the M.P.A degree. He has served on the Board of Trustees of Cornell University (1993–1997). Schuler’s industrial and government experience include engineer and manager with the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company (1959–1968), energy economist with Battelle Memorial Institute (1968–1969), and public service commissioner and deputy chairman for New York State (1981–1983). He has been a consultant to numerous government agencies and industries on pricing, management, and environmental issues and to the World Bank on energy and infrastructure investment programs. From its inception in 1999 until April 2012, he was a founding board member of the New York Independent System Operator that is responsible for operating the electric transmission grid reliably in New York while overseeing an efficient power market. During his tenure he chaired the New York Independent System Operator board’s market performance, reliability and markets, and its governance committees, and from 2008–2010 he was the board’s lead director. Schuler’s degrees include a B.E. in electrical

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing the Resilience of the Nation's Electricity System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24836.
×

engineering, Yale, 1959; an M.B.A., Lehigh, 1969; and a Ph.D. in economics, Brown, 1972. He has been a registered professional engineer in Pennsylvania since 1963.

SUSAN TIERNEY is a senior advisor at Analysis Group and is an expert on energy economics, regulation, and policy, particularly in the electric and gas industries. She has consulted to businesses, governments, tribes, non-profit organizations, foundations, and other organizations on energy markets, economic and environmental regulation and strategy, and energy policy. She has participated as an expert in civil litigation cases, in regulatory proceedings before state and federal agencies, on a variety of boards and commissions, and on National Academies’ committees. Previously, she served as the assistant secretary for policy at DOE. She was the secretary for environmental affairs in Massachusetts, commissioner at the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities, chairman of the Board of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, and executive director of the Massachusetts Energy Facilities Siting Council. She chairs DOE’s Electricity Advisory Committee as well as the External Advisory Board of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and she previously served on the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board. She is a director of the World Resources Institute, Resources for the Future, and other boards. She has published widely, frequently speaks at industry conferences, and has lectured at many leading universities. Tierney received her Ph.D. and M.A. in regional planning from Cornell University.

DAVID G. VICTOR is director of the Laboratory on International Law and Regulation and a professor at the School of Global Policy and Strategy at the University of California, San Diego, where he also co-leads the university’s Deep Decarbonization Initiative. His research focuses on how regulatory law affects the environment, technology choices, industrial structure, and the operation of major energy markets. Prior to joining the University of California, San Diego, Victor served as director of the Program on Energy and Sustainable Development at Stanford University where he was also a professor at the law school. He is a member of the Board of Directors of EPRI, on the advisory council for the Institute of Nuclear Power Plant Operators, and chairman of the Community Engagement Panel that is helping to guide the decommissioning of Units 2 and 3 at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. He has contributed to numerous publications on topics such as energy market innovations and electric power market reform.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing the Resilience of the Nation's Electricity System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24836.
×
Page 144
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing the Resilience of the Nation's Electricity System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24836.
×
Page 145
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing the Resilience of the Nation's Electricity System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24836.
×
Page 146
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing the Resilience of the Nation's Electricity System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24836.
×
Page 147
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing the Resilience of the Nation's Electricity System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24836.
×
Page 148
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Americans’ safety, productivity, comfort, and convenience depend on the reliable supply of electric power. The electric power system is a complex “cyber-physical” system composed of a network of millions of components spread out across the continent. These components are owned, operated, and regulated by thousands of different entities. Power system operators work hard to assure safe and reliable service, but large outages occasionally happen. Given the nature of the system, there is simply no way that outages can be completely avoided, no matter how much time and money is devoted to such an effort. The system’s reliability and resilience can be improved but never made perfect. Thus, system owners, operators, and regulators must prioritize their investments based on potential benefits.

Enhancing the Resilience of the Nation’s Electricity System focuses on identifying, developing, and implementing strategies to increase the power system’s resilience in the face of events that can cause large-area, long-duration outages: blackouts that extend over multiple service areas and last several days or longer. Resilience is not just about lessening the likelihood that these outages will occur. It is also about limiting the scope and impact of outages when they do occur, restoring power rapidly afterwards, and learning from these experiences to better deal with events in the future.

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