National Academies Press: OpenBook

Alternative Fuels in Airport Fleets (2017)

Chapter: Acronyms

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Page 32
Suggested Citation:"Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Alternative Fuels in Airport Fleets. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24868.
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Page 32

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33 ACRONYMS BD Biodiesel BEV Battery-electric vehicle CARB California Air Resources Board CNG Compressed natural gas DOE Department of Energy EIA Energy Information Administration GGE Gasoline gallon equivalent GHG Greenhouse gas GSE Ground support equipment HEV Hybrid-electric vehicle Kg Kilogram kWh Kilowatt-hour LNG Liquefied natural gas LPG Liquefied petroleum gas (propane) NOx Nitrogen oxides PHEV Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle RNG Renewable natural gas VALE Voluntary Airport Low Emissions

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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 85: Alternative Fuels in Airport Fleets is designed to assist airport operators in analyzing complex procurement, operational, and environmental decisions when considering alternative fuels in airport fleets.

Airports own and contract fleets to transport passengers, staff, and goods by on- and off-road vehicles. Although most transportation fuels are consumed by aircraft, using alternative fuels in airport fleets is one opportunity airports have to control emissions and fuel costs and potentially reduce maintenance.

The report compiles information on eight alternative fuels, including biodiesel, renewable diesel, compressed natural gas, renewable natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, and electricity.

Ethanol and hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are not included in this report because the driving experience and refueling operations associated with ethanol and HEVs are well understood and documented elsewhere.

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