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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Sustaining Ocean Observations to Understand Future Changes in Earth's Climate. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24919.
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Appendix C

Acronyms

AMOC

Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

CEOS

Committee on Earth Observing Satellites

CLIVAR

Originally the Climate Variability and Predictability project, but renamed the Climate and Ocean Variability, Predictability, and Change project

DA

Data Assimilation

DBCP

Data Buoy Cooperation Panel

ECV

Essential Climate Variable

EEZs

Exclusive Economic Zones

ENSO

El Niño–Southern Oscillation

ENSO OS

El Niño–Southern Oscillation Observing System

EOV

Essential Ocean Variable

FOO

Framework for Ocean Observing

GCOS

Global Climate Observing System

GLOSS

Global Sea Level Observing System

GMSL

Global Mean Sea Level

GODAE

Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment

GOOS

Global Ocean Observing System

IOC

Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission

IOCCP

International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Sustaining Ocean Observations to Understand Future Changes in Earth's Climate. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24919.
×
IOOC

Interagency Ocean Observation Committee

IOOS

Integrated Ocean Observing System

JCOMM

Joint Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology

JCOMM OCG

JCOMM Observations Coordination Group

JCOMMOPS

JCOMM In-situ Observing Programmes Support Centre

JGOFS

Joint Global Ocean Flux Study

MSR

Marine Science Research

NCEI

National Centers for Environmental Information

NODC

National Oceanographic Data Center

NORLC

National Ocean Research Leadership Council

OceanObs

International community process for review of the Ocean Observing System for Climate

OCP

Ocean-Climate Partnership

OOPC

Ocean Observational Panel for Climate

POGO

Partnership for Observation of the Global Oceans

SOOP

Ships of Opportunity Program

SOT

Ship Observation Team

TOGA

Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere program

UNFCCC

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

UNOLS

University National Oceanographic Laboratory System

WCRP

World Climate Research Program

WHP

WOCE Hydrographic Programme

WMO

World Meteorological Organization

WOCE

World Ocean Circulation Experiment

XBT

eXpendable Bathy-Thermograph

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Sustaining Ocean Observations to Understand Future Changes in Earth's Climate. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24919.
×
Page 135
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Acronyms." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Sustaining Ocean Observations to Understand Future Changes in Earth's Climate. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24919.
×
Page 136
Sustaining Ocean Observations to Understand Future Changes in Earth's Climate Get This Book
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The ocean is an integral component of the Earth’s climate system. It covers about 70% of the Earth’s surface and acts as its primary reservoir of heat and carbon, absorbing over 90% of the surplus heat and about 30% of the carbon dioxide associated with human activities, and receiving close to 100% of fresh water lost from land ice.

With the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, notably carbon dioxide from fossil fuel combustion, the Earth’s climate is now changing more rapidly than at any time since the advent of human societies. Society will increasingly face complex decisions about how to mitigate the adverse impacts of climate change such as droughts, sea-level rise, ocean acidification, species loss, changes to growing seasons, and stronger and possibly more frequent storms.

Observations play a foundational role in documenting the state and variability of components of the climate system and facilitating climate prediction and scenario development. Regular and consistent collection of ocean observations over decades to centuries would monitor the Earth’s main reservoirs of heat, carbon dioxide, and water and provides a critical record of long-term change and variability over multiple time scales. Sustained high-quality observations are also needed to test and improve climate models, which provide insights into the future climate system. Sustaining Ocean Observations to Understand Future Changes in Earth’s Climate considers processes for identifying priority ocean observations that will improve understanding of the Earth’s climate processes, and the challenges associated with sustaining these observations over long timeframes.

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