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Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities (2017)

Chapter: Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24930.
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A-1 While there are wayfinding analyses that touch on accessibility, and there are accessibility audits that touch on wayfinding, heretofore, there has not been a consolidated audit that truly merges both issues into an all-inclusive assessment. This wayfinding accessibility audit checklist includes wayfinding strategies and accessibility features relevant to the passenger’s specific dis- ability. To conduct a successful wayfinding accessibility audit, the following key factors must be evaluated: • Type of passenger: departing, arriving, or connecting • Passenger journey touch points • Type of disability or functional limitation • The three Vs of communication: visual, verbal, and virtual • Standards and/or regulations that apply Figure A-1 is a color-coded key to the checklist and overview of the contents in each section. Each section is numbered to correspond with the chapter content in the guidebook and can be cross-referenced for additional details and information. A p p e n d i x A Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist

A-2 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities Source: ACRP Project 07-13 Research Team Figure A-1. Color-coded key to the Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist.

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-3 Chapter 4 Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist PLANNING (P) REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed Section 4.1: Planning and Design (PD) P-PD.01 The requirements of populations with special needs are addressed during project planning and design, and persons with these disabilities are included in the planning and design process. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X Canadian Transportation Agency, 2007; Federal Aviation Authority, 2016 P-PD.02 When developing new facilities (or technologies) or upgrading them, universal design principles are applied to ensure their use by all travelers to the greatest extent possible without needing specialized design. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X Canadian Transportation Agency, 2007; FAA, 2016 P-PD.03 Airports are designed intuitively to minimize reliance on signage; spatial organizations and architectural features support good wayfinding. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X Canadian Transportation Agency, 2007; Salmi, 2007; Levine, 2003 P-PD.04 Optimum lighting levels are provided throughout the airport at all times of day to support lip reading, reading signs, etc. Visual Verbal X X P-PD.05 A comprehensive wayfinding system is implemented to minimize the need for asking for directions (based on the 3 Vs of communication). Visual Virtual X X X X P-PD.06 Background noise levels are reduced by providing soundproofing in some areas, such as information desks, and through the selection of building materials. Verbal X X P-PD.07 There are planned adjacencies at key decision nodes for information sources: Virtual, e.g., Flight Information Display Systems (FIDS); Verbal, e.g., staff positions and information desks; Visual, e.g., airport directories, etc. (Also ref. DLA.02). Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X P-PD.08 Landmarks are incorporated during the planning and design process using distinct, recognizable shapes. Landmarks are located at key decision points so they are detectable from as many positions as possible without interrupting the path of travel. Landmarks are developed as part of a system to make different parts of the site as noticeable and memorable as possible. Where possible, primary landmarks incorporate tactile, sound and visual indicators. Visual Audible X X X X P-PD.09 Signage is legible, uncluttered and easy to follow with no gaps or disconnects, and signage inventories are developed to remove redundant signs and reduce visual clutter. Visual X X X P-PD.10 Color is used to reinforce wayfinding but not as a primary wayfinding strategy. Visual X X X P-PD.11 Sign messaging uses plain language, not airline/airport jargon. Visual X X X P-PD.12 Large, unadorned, illuminated fonts are used for directional signs. Visual X X X X P-PD.13 Symbols are used consistently with messaging on signs. Familiar or easy-to- learn pictograms are used to reinforce text and bypass language-based information. Visual X X X

A-4 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities P-PD.16 Vertical circulation devices such as stairs, escalators, and elevators are in close proximity and in easy view from entries and major nodes. Visual X X X X REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed P-PD.14 Pictures are used on signs to help persons with intellectual disabilities navigate. Visual X X P-PD.15 Arrows are consistently applied. Plain language is used: “straight ahead” instead of an arrow pointing up or down when there is risk of being confused with “upstairs” or “downstairs.” Conversely, the words “upstairs” or “downstairs” are used when communicating guidance through non- intuitive vertical transition wayfinding scenarios. Use of diagonal arrows is avoided when possible. Visual X X X P-PD.17 In multistory buildings, elements such as restrooms, elevators, and exits are organized in the same location on each floor. Visual X X X X P-PD.18 “You Are Here” maps are designed with correct, forward-facing orientation to match the direction the viewer faces when using the map. Visual X X X P-PD.19 Maps and graphic information are used to communicate and emphasize the form of circulation at primary nodes rather than secondary nodes. Visual X X X Section 4.2: Staff Training (ST) P-ST.01 Staff are trained to speak clearly and face customers directly. Verbal X X X X P-ST.02 Public announcements to support successful trip execution are made in both visual and audible formats. Staff training - audible formats include plain language, spoken clearly and slowly, so as to be more easily understood (Also ref. DGA.49). Verbal X X X Section 4.3: Database Environment / Management (DB) P-DB.01 Data environment, data management tools, and information management policies to manage all accessibility-related information for the airport are in place. Virtual X X X X Section 4.4: Website (WS) P-WS.01 The airport website meets Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0. Virtual X X X X http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag.p hp P-WS.02 The website is tested for functionality by users with a variety of disabilities. Virtual X X X X P-WS.03 Where airports provide online visual maps for pre-trip planning, they are accompanied by text maps for travelers with print disabilities including vision loss. Virtual X P-WS.04 Directories give specific locations for points of interest: restaurants, stores, and services. Virtual X X X X Example: DFW https://www.dfwairport.com/services/ P-WS.05 The airline terminal directory gives exact locations for check-in and ticketing counters and whether curbside check-in is available (and its specific location), as well as for baggage claim carousels. Virtual X X X X P-WS.06 The home page includes a link for disability- related information and resources. Virtual X X X X Example: LAX http://www.lawa.org/welcomelax.aspx P-WS.07 There is a complete list of accessible airport services and facilities. Virtual X X X X 28 CFR 35.163

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-5 P-WS.08 Telephone numbers (including TTY or relay service) where travelers with disabilities can receive assistance or get additional information are posted along with hours of service. Virtual X X X X REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed P-WS.09 Information on ground transportation options (public and private) includes details on accessibility and links to accessible providers. Virtual X X X X P-WS.10 Where arrival points for ground transportation are remote from terminal entrances, distances or average walking times are listed and availability of moving walkways is indicated. The website also notes whether assistance and means to call for assistance (courtesy phone or kiosk) are available at these arrival points. Virtual X X X X P-WS.11 Information on airport transportation options (between terminals, onsite parking, etc.) includes details on accessibility. Virtual X X X X P-WS.12 Information is provided on whether connections between terminals (domestic or international) are located inside or outside of security and on estimated travel times. Virtual X X X X P-WS.13 Where terminals or concourses within a terminal are connected by walkways only, distances or average walking times are listed and whether moving walkways are available. Virtual X X X X P-WS.14 Distances/average walking times are provided from check-in to the furthest gate on each terminal concourse. Virtual X X X X P-WS.15 Evacuation plans are included on the website: emergency exits and routes, evacuation elevators, areas of safe rescue, airport procedures in case of evacuation, staff training, etc. Virtual X X X X Example: LAX, http://www.lawa.org/ADA.aspx?id=1 766#EPL P-WS.16 Online virtual tour for pre-trip planning is captioned (ex: Wayfinder on Massport's Boston Logan website) Virtual X X X X Example: CVG http://www.cvgairport.com/terminal/vi deos Section 4.5: Mobile Application (MA) P-MA.01 The airport mobile application follows “Mobile Web Best Practices.” Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X http://www.w3.org/TR/mobile-bp/ IBM has a new Mobile Accessibility Checker for Apple iOS and Google Android mobile applications P-MA.02 The application is tested for functionality by users with a variety of disabilities. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X P-MA.03 The application can detect device/passenger location, provide filtered information by proximity or category, create accessible route guidance and help the passenger navigate the airport. Location detection can be achieved through GPS, Wi-Fi, beacons, or other techniques. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X P-MA.04 The application provides a mechanism to filter information relevant to the passenger’s disability and specific needs. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X P-MA.05 The application provides a “Help Me” function that enables the user to immediately communicate with airport accessibility staff or the call center (and staff can be notified of their communication preferences). Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X

A-6 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities P-MA.06 Airport and airline applications are fully accessible for smartphone users who use VoiceOver (iOS) or TalkBack (Android) Virtual X No current legal requirement but testing by the research team indicates minor changes are needed to make at least airline applications accessible to users who are blind. REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed Section 4.6: Call Center (CC) P-CC.01 Staff has computer access to the accessibility database as well as real-time data on IROPS/emergencies. Verbal X X X X P-CC.02 The call center has TTY or other means to communicate with people with hearing loss or speech disability such as a relay service, texting, or chat room. Visual Virtual X P-CC.03 The staff is trained in the use of the TTY, relay service, etc. Visual Virtual Verbal X P-CC.04 The staff has disability awareness training. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X P-CC.05 The staff is trained on how to correctly give directions to people with vision loss. Verbal X P-CC.06 Standardized directions for commonly requested routes are available in the accessibility database. Virtual X X X X P-CC.07 The staff can assist/provide instructions to individuals using the website and mobile application. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X P-CC.08 The staff is fluent in English and other local languages and has access to interpreters for many languages through services like the AT&T language line. Verbal X X X X P-CC.09 Airport brochures or other print information for distribution to the public are available in alternate formats (large print, Braille, digital via email, and digital via the website) as preferred and on request. Visual Virtual X 28 CFR Part 35.160 / 28 CFR Part 36.303 Chapter 5 Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist DEPARTING PASSENGER (D) Section 5.1: Departures Arrival Points (AP) / 5.1.1 Curbside D-AP.01 Accessible drop-off points for people with disabilities have been designated by the airport, appear on web, mobile, and terminal maps and directories, and are appropriately signed for easy viewing from roadways. Visual Virtual X X X X Passenger loading zones scoping and design: 2010 ADAAS 209 and 503 D-AP.02 Walking surfaces are stable, firm, and slip- resistant, inside and outside terminals and parking garages, and have no openings larger than 0.5”. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 302.3 D-AP.03 Visual and auditory signals are in place at pedestrian crossings with traffic lights, with adequate crossing time for those who move more slowly. Visual X X X X D-AP.04 Where there are no signals, pedestrian crossing signs are prominently displayed for drivers and pedestrians. Raised pedestrian crossings help to slow traffic while providing level access. Speed bump signage and road markings are in place. Visual Virtual X X X X D-AP.05 Pedestrian crossings have higher illumination levels and/or different colors. Visual X X X X

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-7 REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed D-AP.06 Detectable warnings are in place at curb ramps and marked crosswalks. Visual X X DOT ADA Standards (2006) 406.8 NPRM Public Rights of Way D-AP.07 If the sidewalk is flush with the roadway, detectable warnings are in place along the entire edge. Visual X X D-AP.08 At least one accessible route is provided within the site from accessible parking spaces and accessible passenger loading zones, public streets and sidewalks, and public transportation stops to the accessible building or facility entrance they serve. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 206.2.1 D-AP.09 Assistance or means to request assistance is available outside the terminal, e.g., curbside check-in, accessible kiosk/call point or telephone identified by an easily visible and tactile sign. Verbal Virtual X X X X D-AP.10 Directional and identification signs have fonts that are easily read, have good contrast, are non-glare and allow close approach wherever possible. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 703.5 D-AP.11 Directional and identification signs include pictograms to aid comprehension by persons with intellectual disabilities and international travelers. Visual X D-AP.12 Identification signs are visual and tactile, i.e., have raised characters and Braille and are correctly positioned. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 703 D-AP.13 Service Animal Relief Areas (SARAs) are located as close as possible to terminal entrances with at least one accessible route (ref. DAP.08). Visual X X X X Section 5.1: Departures Arrival Points (AP) / 5.1.2 Other Arrival Points D-AP.14 Other points of arrival are identified on airport maps, website, and mobile application, if provided. Virtual X X X X D-AP.15 Means to request assistance is available at other points of arrival, e.g., accessible kiosk/call point or telephone identified by easily visible and tactile sign . Virtual Verbal X X X X For the DOT's definition of terminal entrances, see DOT FAQ 28. http://www.dot.gov/airconsumer/frequ ently-asked-questions-may-13-2009. Under EC1107, means to request assistance is required at all points of arrival including accessible parking areas. D-AP.16 A seating area, with some seats signed for disability priority, is available for passengers waiting for assistance. Visual X X X X D-AP.17 A staff member is on hand to direct passengers, e.g., at monorail stations. Verbal X X X X Examples: JFK, EWR D-AP.18 There is at least one accessible route from each remote arrival point to each airport terminal, with each element (walking surfaces, ramps, lifts, elevators, doors, etc.) meeting either 1991 or 2010 ADAAS. Visual X X 2010 ADAAS 206.2.1 D-AP.19 There are no objects protruding more than 4” into the path of travel that are not cane detectable (lower edge 27” or less above finished floor), e.g., fire extinguishers, pay phones, drinking fountains. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 307.2 D-AP.20 Overhead clearance is 80” minimum and unenclosed stairs or escalators have a rail or barrier underneath. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 307.4 D-AP.21 Seating areas for resting, with some seats signed for disability priority, are provided at frequent intervals and located out of the circulation path. Visual X X X X No ADA standard. Building and Construction Authority. Code on Barrier-Free Accessibility in Buildings, Singapore, 2002, recommends seating areas no more than 30 m (328 ft) apart.

A-8 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed D-AP.22 Where there is more than one terminal connected to the arrival point, an airline directory (static or dynamic signage) is hung at eye level and has large fonts, good contrast, and no glare. Visual Virtual X X X X 2010 ADAAS D-AP.23 Directional signs have large, unadorned, illuminated fonts. Visual X X X X D-AP.24 Corridors and hallways are evenly illuminated with gradual transitions from dark to bright spaces, especially those that have high levels of natural light. Visual X X X X D-AP.25 Accessible routes coincide with or are located in the same area as general circulation paths. Elevators and lifts are in the same area as stairs and escalators. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 206.3 D-AP.26 Where elevators are not near or in sight of stairs and escalators, directional signage is provided. Visual X X X X D-AP.27 Elevators meet Americans with Disabilities Act Standards (ADA Standards) for signage, controls, visible and audible indicators, two- way communication systems, etc. Announcement of floor is preferable to beeping sound. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 407, 408, 409, 708 D-AP.28 Audible indicators outside elevators are loud enough to be heard over ambient noise. Visual X X X X D-AP.29 Accessible means of egress (e.g., evacuation elevators, areas of safe refuge, exit stairways, horizontal exits, etc.) are available and have appropriate identification and directional signage. Visual X X X X International Building Code (IBC)-2000 (including 2001 Supplement to the International Codes) and IBC-2003 D-AP.30 Detectable warnings are in place at curb ramps, marked crosswalks, and wherever the accessible route crosses vehicular roadways in parking structures. Visual X X DOT ADA Standards (2006) 406.8 NPRM Public Rights of Way D-AP.31 Detectable floor surface changes (color, texture) are in place at approaches to escalators, moving walkways, and stairs. Visual X X X X D-AP.32 An audible signal alerts passengers to the end of moving walkways. Visual X X X X D-AP.33 Emergency communications equipment is provided at strategic locations wherever potential security or safety threats may exist and is identified by visual and tactile signage. Locations are noted in the access database and mobile application, if any. Virtual X X X X Standard for two-way communications system 2010 ADAAS 708 Section 5.2: Parking (PK) D-PK.01 A smartphone application is available for locating parking spaces. Virtual X X X D-PK.02 A smart garage system aids in finding empty spaces. Virtual X X X D-PK.03 A smart garage car-finding system and smartphone application help customers find their cars. Virtual X X X D-PK.04 Accessible parking spaces in parking lots and parking garages adjacent to the terminal are connected by an accessible path of travel to terminal entrances with each element (walking surfaces, ramps, lifts, elevators, doors, etc.) meeting either 1991 or 2010 ADAAS. Visual X

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-9 REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed D-PK.05 Accessible parking spaces are located on the shortest possible route(s) to accessible terminal entrance(s) and dispersed if there is more than one accessible entrance. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 208.3.1 D-PK.06 All accessible van spaces are grouped on one level in a multi-car parking facility. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 208.3.1 D-PK.07 All accessible parking locations are identified in the airport access database, on maps and the mobile application, if any. X D-PK.08 The number of accessible van and car spaces meets minimum local, state, or federal scoping (whichever is highest) and standards for size and identification signage. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 208.2 D-PK.09 Directional signs are in place from the adjacent parking garage and parking lots to the closest terminal entrance. Visual X X X 2010 ADAAS 703 D-PK.10 Accessible parking spaces are on the shortest possible accessible route to the shuttle bus stop, monorail station, or other accessible means of transportation linking parking lots to airport terminals. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 208.3 D-PK.11 The number of accessible van and car spaces in remote lots meets minimum local, state, or federal scoping (whichever is highest) and ADA standards for size and identification signage. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 208.2 D-PK.12 Accessible parking spaces do not have to be provided in each parking facility on the site but must have equivalence in terms of distance, parking fees, and user convenience. For areas where accessible parking may not exist, directional signage leading users to these accommodations is required. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 208 D-PK.13 Shuttle bus stops and shelters meet ADA accessibility standards for dimension, paths of travel, and route signs. Bus schedules are not subject to signage standards. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 810.2, 810.3 D-PK.14 Shuttle bus drivers have disability awareness training in assisting and communicating with people with disabilities. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 37 5 D-PK.16 Signage for station entrances, routes, and destinations and station names comply with ADA accessibility standards. Visual Virtual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 810.6 D-PK.17 Staff is available in stations and on platforms to provide assistance and directions. Verbal X X X X Examples: AirTrain, JFK, EWR. Section 5.3: Rental Car (RC) D-RC.01 There is at least one accessible route from the rental car facility to the airport terminal. Visual X X X X D-RC.02 Directional signs are in place from the rental car drop-off area to the closest terminal entrance. Visual X X X X D-RC.03 Facility entrances, paths of travel, counters, and other features meet ADA Standards. Visual X X X X D-RC.04 An accessible means of transport links the rental car facility with airport terminals, e.g., shuttle bus, automated people mover. Visual X X X X Section 5.4: Lobby Area (LA) D-LA.01 Wide automatic doors provide universal ease of access. Visual X X X X Visual Virtual D-PK.15 Stations and platforms or automated people movers meet ADA standards. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 810.

A-10 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed D-LA.02 An information desk is located inside the terminal entrance and grouped with other information sources such as FIDSs, directories, or maps. If the airport has an information desk on the arrivals level only, directional signage for the information desk is prominently displayed at entrance(s) on the departures level. Verbal Virtual X X X X D-LA.03 The information desk has prominent identification signage with a pictogram. Visual X X X X D-LA.04 A counter induction loop is installed for persons who are hard of hearing and have hearing aids or cochlear implants with T-coils. A hearing loop graphic sign is displayed on the counter. Verbal X D-LA.05A The information desk has video remote interpreting service. Virtual Verbal X D-LA.05B Staff is fluent in English and other local languages and has access to interpreters for many languages through means such as the AT&T language line. Virtual Verbal X X X X D-LA.06 A correctly oriented “You Are Here” illuminated map with large font designed for close approach is located at major decision points throughout the airport. Visual Virtual X X X X D-LA.07 Seating areas, with some seats designated as disability priority, are located near the information desk and terminal entrances. Visual X X X X D-LA.08 FIDS are located at frequent intervals. Virtual X X X X D-LA.09 Visual paging is built into TV monitors. Virtual X D-LA.10 Escalators include visual reinforcement of operating direction. Visual X X D-LA.11 Elevators have glass doors for open sight lines and ease of identification. Visual X X D-LA.12 Primary entrance doors have clear identification of terminal, level, and a unique door number. Visual X X X D-LA.13 Self-identification is promoted and encouraged so that travelers are more likely to relay their disability-specific needs to staff. This can take place at any touch point: curbside check-in, lobby information desk, ticketing check-in, etc. Links are posted to TSA notification card that assures appropriate assistance. Visual Verbal Virtual X X X X Canadian Transportation Agency, 2007 - Self-identification is absolutely essential. Customers often think that by providing advance notice of a need for assistance that they will receive it, but we cannot identify customers on sight; customers often will only need/utilize assistance in one airport but not another; customers are offended when we proactively offer assistance. Section 5.5: Ticketing (TK) D-TK.01 Static or dynamic signage listing the location of each airline’s ticket and check-in counters is hung at eye level and has large fonts, good contrast and no glare. This is available at each entry point. Visual Virtual X X X X D-TK.02 Directional signs have large, unadorned, illuminated fonts. Visual X X X X D-TK.03 Directional and identification signs include pictograms to improve comprehension by persons with intellectual disabilities and international travelers. Visual X D-TK.04 Lighting levels are optimal at all times of day throughout the terminal to support the reading of signs. Visual X X X X

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-11 REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed D-TK.05 If installed after 12/12/2016, check-in kiosks meet new accessibility standards under 14 CFR Part 382, and fully accessible kiosks are identified with a wheelchair symbol. Virtual X X X X 49 CFR Part 27.71 14 CFR Part 382.57 D-TK.06A A ticket agent is available to assist at check-in kiosks, or people with disabilities who cannot readily use the automated kiosks may go to the head of the line. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.57 D-TK.06B Crowd control barriers have a lower belt or rail that is cane (and guide dog) detectible, i.e., 27" maximum above the floor, on outermost lines adjacent to paths of travel. D-TK.07 A counter induction loop is installed at one check-in counter with priority access for persons who are hard of hearing and have hearing aids or cochlear implants with T-coils. A hearing loop graphic sign is displayed on the counter. Verbal X An Airline complaint resolution official (CRO) is available in person or remotely (by phone, TTY, text, etc.) to resolve disability-related issues involving requested accommodations, assistive devices, checked baggage, etc. D-TK.09 Where baggage drop-off is not at the check-in counter, ticket agents provide directions or assistance. Verbal X X X X D-TK.10 Where a terminal has multiple security check points, ticket agents direct passengers to the appropriate location. Verbal X X X X D-TK.11 A seating area is available for passengers who need to wait for assistance from the airline/service company and designated as priority seating. Visual X X X X D-TK.12 Accessible routes coincide with, or are located in, the same area as general circulation paths. Elevators and lifts are in the same area as stairs and escalators. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 206.3 D-TK.13 Where elevators and lifts are not near or in sight of stairs and escalators, directional signage is provided. Visual X X X X D-TK.14 Elevators meet ADA Standards for signage, controls, visible and audible indicators, two- way communication systems, etc. Announcement of floor levels is preferable to a beeping sound. Visual X X X X D-TK.15 Detectable floor surface changes (color, texture) are in place at approaches to escalators, moving walkways, and stairs. Visual X X X X D-TK.16 Accessible men’s and women’s restrooms, a companion restroom, and drinking fountains are located before security. Visual X X X X D-TK.17 Visual and tactile signage for all permanent rooms and spaces, e.g., restrooms, is placed at the height and location specified under the ADA Standards. All accessible restrooms, not just companion/family facilities, are identified with a wheelchair symbol, especially in international airports/terminals. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 216.2, 703 (While ADA Standards do not require a wheelchair symbol identification where all restrooms in a facility are accessible, this may be confusing to foreign travelers to whom the lack of the wheelchair symbol means lack of accessibility ADAAG, 2010) D-TK.18 The maximum force for pushing or pulling open an interior door, e.g., to a companion restroom, is 5 lbs. (exception fire doors). Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 404.2.9 FIDSs are hung at eye level for close approach with larger fonts, good contrast, and a slower refresh rate. Virtual D-TK.08 Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.151, 382.153. A CRO must be made available at any point in the traveler’s journey when a disability-related problem arises, as well as during the reservation and booking process. D-TK.19 X X X X

A-12 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities D-TK.20 FIDS information is available via a mobile application or verbally via a dedicated telephone number. Virtual X X X X Section 5.6: Security Checkpoint (SC) REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed D-SC.01 There is a dedicated lane for employees and people with disabilities, clearly identified by signage or staff direct people with disabilities, or those who self-identify as needing the accommodation, to the front of the line. Visual X X X X Example, large overhead sign for these lanes at PHL. D-SC.02 Personnel are at lane entrances, and then TSA employees direct passengers to the correct lane. Verbal X X X X Note: Per the TSA, passengers with disabilities may use a non-dedicated lane provided it meets their accessibility requirements. D-SC.03 On request, TSA employees reconnect the passenger with their belongings on the belt, or collect the passenger’s belongings from the belt, to ensure they are not lost or stolen during the screening process. Service company employees can also assist. Verbal X X X X D-SC.04 Passenger Support Specialists (PSSs), trained TSA disability experts, are available to resolve problems or complaints or provide additional assistance. Verbal X X X X D-SC.05 If there is no SARA installed airside, a TSA policy is in place to allow people traveling with service/emotional support animals to bypass the line on return. Verbal X X X X 49 CFR Part 27.71 requires SARAs airside with limited exceptions. D-SC.06 Directional signs have large, unadorned, illuminated fonts. Visual X X X X D-SC.07 An airline directory (static or dynamic signage) is hung at eye level and has large fonts, good contrast and no glare. Visual Virtual X X X X D-SC.08 FIDS are located at security exit points. Virtual X X X X D-SC.09 Visual paging is built into TV monitors or FIDS. Virtual X NOTE: For International Passengers, reference International Flights (IN)—Passport Control section below. Section 5.81: Gate Area (GA) D-GA.01 At major decision points, multisensory destination/directional information is provided via a map, kiosk, or information booth. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X D-GA.02 Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 703.5 D-GA.03 Directional and identification signs include pictograms to aid comprehension by persons with intellectual disabilities and international travelers. Visual X D-GA.04 Identification signs are visual and tactile, i.e., have raised characters and Braille, and correctly positioned. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 703 D-GA.05 Directional signs have large, unadorned, illuminated fonts. Visual X X X X D-GA.06 FIDSs are located at frequent intervals along concourses. Virtual X X X X D-GA.07 FIDSs are hung at eye level for close approach with larger fonts, good contrast and a slower refresh rate. Virtual X X X X D-GA.08 FIDS information is available via a mobile application or verbally via a dedicated telephone number. Virtual X X X X 1 Section 5.7: Vertical Transition does not appear in the checklist because it reviews items D-AP-25, D-TK.12, D-AP.26, D-TK.13, D-AP.31, D-TK.15, D-LA.10, and D-LA.11, which already appear in Sections 5.1, 5.5, and 5.4 of the checklist. Directional and identification signs have fonts that are easily read, good contrast, non-glare, and allow close approach wherever possible.

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-13 Visual paging is available at frequent intervals along concourses, e.g., built into FIDSs. Pages may also be provided on the airport website or via a mobile application. D-GA.09 Virtual X Example: MSP posts all pages on its website. D-GA.10 The paging system allows passengers to request audible or visual page by phone, text, or email. Virtual Verbal X X X X REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed D-GA.11 Courtesy phones are located at regular intervals along the concourse, including at major decision points, and are identified by visual and tactile signage. Verbal X X X X D-GA.12 Directional signage for gate numbers is located at regular intervals, at all entrances onto the concourse from security, and at all decision points/nodes. Visual X X X X D-GA.13 Signs indicating the direction to baggage claim/terminal exit are located at frequent intervals and outside restrooms. Visual X X X X D-GA.14 Good lines of sight allow travelers to see a series of gate numbers along the concourse, i.e., gate numbers are not blocked by other signage or architectural elements. Visual X X X X D-GA.15 Gate numbers follow a regular pattern, e.g., even on left, odd on right, and are distinguished by a zone identifier, not just a number, e.g., A5 on the A concourse. Visual X X X X D-GA.16 Seating areas for resting, with some seats signed for disability priority, are provided at frequent intervals and located out of the circulation path, e.g., where there are long corridors not adjoining holding areas. Visual X X X X No ADA standard. Building and Construction Authority. Code on Barrier-Free Accessibility In Buildings, Singapore, 2002, recommends seating areas no more than 30 m (328 ft) apart. D-GA.17 Differences in floor texture and color help provide an "edge" for wayfinding and distinguish the concourse walkway from holding areas. Visual X X D-GA.18 Detectable floor surface changes (color, texture) are in place at approaches to escalators, moving walkways and stairs. Visual X X X X D-GA.19 Corridors and hallways are evenly illuminated with gradual transitions from dark to bright spaces, especially those that have high levels of natural light. Visual X X X X D-GA.20 Accessible routes coincide with, or are located in, the same area as general circulation paths. Elevators and lifts must be in the same area as stairs and escalators. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 206.3 D-GA.21 Where elevators are not near or in sight of stairs and escalators, directional signage is provided. Visual X X X X D-GA.22 Elevators meet ADA Standards for signage, controls, visible and audible indicators, two- way communication systems, etc. Announcement of floors is preferable to a beeping sound. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 407, 408, 409, 708 D-GA.23 There are no objects protruding more than 4” into the path of travel that are not cane detectable (lower edge 27” or less above finished floor), e.g., fire extinguishers, pay phones, and drinking fountains. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 307 D-GA.24 Overhead clearance is 80” minimum, and there are no unenclosed stairs or escalators without a rail or barrier underneath. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 307.4 D-GA.25 An audible signal alerts passengers to the end of moving walkways. Visual X X X X D-GA.26 Accessible means of egress (evacuation elevators, areas of safe refuge, exit stairways, horizontal exits, etc.) have appropriate identification and directional signage in view from concourse walkways and/or holding rooms. Visual X X X X International Building Code (IBC)-2000 (including 2001 Supplement to the International Codes) and IBC-2003.

A-14 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed D-GA.27 Signs at exit doors and areas of safe rescue are tactile as well as visual. Instructions for summoning assistance in areas of safe rescue are also tactile with an accessible two-way communication system in place. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X 2010 ADAAS 216.4, 703.1, 703.2, 703.5, 708 D-GA.28 Airport, airline and concessions staff have training on the Airport Evacuation Plan (AEP) and how to assist passengers with disabilities in case of emergency. Verbal X X X X ACRP Reports 112, 73, 95 D-GA.29 Visual and audible signaling systems are under central control to help direct people along best route. Push notification sends emergency information and directions to mobile phones. Visual Virtual X X X X D-GA.30 Where people movers to or along the concourse are optional, dynamic signage indicates flights or gates for which the tram or monorail ride is recommended. Walking times/distances are provided. Virtual X X X X Example: FIDSs at DTW display a tram icon for flights from distant gates. D-GA.31 Station and other announcements on the automated people mover are both visual and audible. Virtual X X X X Example, MCO D-GA.32 A designated seating area and wheelchair area with grab bar are provided in the cars. Visual X X X X D-GA.33 Effective directional signage is in place, especially where a level change is involved. Visual X X X X D-GA.34 On long concourses, maps with point-of- interest directories are placed at regular intervals. Virtual X X X X D-GA.35 SARAs available airside are centrally located to minimize walking times, have appropriate directional and identification signage, and appear on maps/directories. Visual X X X X 49 CFR Part 27.71. Also see FAA Draft Advisory Circular AC-150/5360- 14A, Appendix A for proposed standards for SARAs. D-GA.36 Staff are available who can speak in sign language and know how to identify and reach those who need this service. If no staff member is versed in sign language, remote Interpreting (at airport information desk or Traveler's Aid) enables communication with travelers who are deaf. Virtual Verbal X Example, SFO D-GA.37 Restrooms, companion restrooms, and drinking fountains are grouped at frequent intervals along concourses with men’s and women’s facilities in a standard relation to each other, e.g., men’s to the left of women’s. Visual X X X X D-GA.38 Visual X X X X D-GA.39 Restaurant menus are in large print, Braille, or posted in an accessible format online. Visual Virtual X 28 CFR Part 36.303 D-GA.40 For electronic menus, e.g., on an iPad, accessibility features such as VoiceOver are enabled, and the device allows close approach for easyviewing. Virtual X D-GA.41 Restaurants that have wall menus also have a large print copy available on request. Visual X D-GA.42 Restaurant staff will read the menu or assist with electronic menus. Verbal D-GA.43 Restaurant staff willingly accommodate service animals. Verbal X X X X 28 CFR Part 36.302 D-GA.44 Aisles in stores and spaces between tables in restaurants have a clear width of 36”. Visual X X 2010 ADAAS 403.5.1 D-GA.45A Restaurant and retail staff have disability awareness training, including how to guide people who are blind. Verbal X X X X Restaurants, food kiosks, and convenience stores are distributed along concourses to provide close access from all gates.

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-15 REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed D-GA.45B ATMs and currency exchange counters meet ADA accessibility standards. 2010 ADAAS 707 and 904 D-GA.46 VIP lounges are fully accessible, have appropriate directional and identification signage, and are identified on the airport access database, maps, and directories. Visual X X X X D-GA.47 Gate agents provide confirmation that the passenger is at the correct gate as well as expected boarding and departure time. Verbal X X X X D-GA.48 The quality of the PA system and terminal acoustics allow announcements in the gate area to be easily understood. Visual X X X X D-GA.49 Gate areas have induction loops to allow PA announcements to be transmitted directly to persons using hearing aids with T-coils or cochlear implants. Graphic signage alerting passengers to the presence of the hearing loop is displayed on the podium. Verbal X D-GA.50 There is a general pre-boarding announcement for people with disabilities or personal notification by gate agents for those who self- identify as needing to pre-board. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.93 D-GA.51 Gate Information Display Systems (GIDSs), have real-time information, including which rows are boarding. Virtual X X X D-GA.52 Passengers with sensory disabilities who self- identify are provided prompt access to information given to other passengers, personally by the gate agent if no other means is employed, e.g., GIDS, text message, PA system, etc. Virtual X X 14 CFR Part 382.53 D-GA.53 Accessible recharging stations are available in the gate area for mobile devices and assistive equipment. Visual X X X X D-GA.54 TV monitors have high contrast closed captioning enabled. Virtual X 14 CFR Part 382.51 D-GA.55 Visual paging is built into TV monitors. Virtual X D-GA.56 A designated seating area for people with disabilities is located near the podium or boarding gate. Visual X X X X D-GA.57 Airline or service company personnel assist passengers with disabilities to the door of the plane or seat, as needed. Verbal X X X X D-GA.58 Boarding bridge slopes are as gentle as possible, with handrails at transitions and minimal gap/step into plane. Visual X X X X FAA Advisory Circular 150/5220-21C Aircraft Boarding Equipment D-GA.59 Passenger wheelchairs may be used until the door of plane then gate-checked for stowage as cargo, or manual chairs or walkers may be stowed in the cabin on a first-come, first-serve basis. An elevator or lift near the jet bridge allows safe and timely transfer of wheelchairs to the tarmac for stowage. Verbal X 14 CFR Part 382 Subpart I – Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices D-GA.60 A CRO is available in person or remotely (by phone, TTY, text, etc.) to resolve disability- related issues involving requested accommodations, assistive devices, carry-on baggage, denied boarding, etc. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.151, 382.153. Section 5.9: Airline Support (AS) D-AS.01 In case of flight cancellation, the rebooking center is accessible with either a ticket agent or phone instead of/in addition to an inaccessible touch-screen kiosk. Alternatively, passengers can rebook by airline mobile application. Virtual Verbal X X X X D-AS.02 Where possible, passengers with disabilities are given priority in rebooking. Verbal X X X X In Europe, priority is mandated under EC 261/2004.

A-16 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed D-AS.03 A counter induction loop is installed at one rebooking counter with priority access for persons who are hard of hearing and have hearing aids or cochlear implants with T-coils. A hearing loop graphic sign is displayed on the counter. Verbal X D-AS.04 Rebooking centers have appropriate directional and identification signage and appear on maps/directories. Visual Virtual X X X X D-AS.05 Staff from the airline service company are recalled by gate agents to provide an escort to the rebooking center and the new gate. Verbal X X X X D-AS.06 Gate agents direct passengers to rebooking centers. Verbal D-AS.07 A CRO is available in person or remotely (by phone, TTY, text, etc.) to resolve disability- related issues. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.151, 382.153. Section 5.10: International Flights (IN)—Passport Control D-IN.01 There is a dedicated lane for employees and people with disabilities, clearly identified by signage, or staff direct people with disabilities or those who self-identify as needing the accommodation to the front of the line. Visual Verbal X X X X D-IN.02 Personnel at lane entrances direct passengers to the correct lane. Verbal X X X X Chapter 6 Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist ARRIVING PASSENGER (A) REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed Section 6.1: Airline Support (AS) A-AS.01 Baggage claim information is provided on board aircraft by flight attendant or by agent in gate area after arrival, verbally or visually as needed. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.69, 382.119 A-AS.02 Baggage claim information is sent by text message, or the passenger can check carousel location via mobile phone after arrival. Virtual X X X X A-AS.03 Agent gives directions to baggage claim. Verbal X X X X A-AS.04 Passenger uses mobile application for directions/route to baggage claim. Virtual X X X X A-AS.05 Airline service provider meets plane and provides wheelchair assistance or escort from seat or door of plane, as needed, to baggage claim. Service by electric cart replaces wheelchair service for ambulatory passengers in some airports. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.91 A-AS.06 In case of ad hoc request(s), airline or service agent calls for additional personnel to provide assistance. Verbal X X X X A-AS.07 Passenger’s wheelchair, if any, is returned at door of plane. For those stowed as cargo, elevator or lift near jet bridge allows prompt delivery from tarmac. Verbal X 14 CFR Part 382.125(c) A-AS.08 A CRO is available in person or remotely (e.g., by phone, TTY, text) to resolve issues involving damage or loss of an assistive device, assistance in the terminal, etc. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.151, 382.153. A CRO must be made available at any point in the traveler's trip when a disability-related problem arises as well as during the reservation and booking process.

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-17 NOTE: For International Passengers, reference International Flights (IN), Immigration and Baggage Claim below. Section 6.2: Gate Area (GA) REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed A-GA.01 Signs indicating direction to baggage claim/terminal exit are in easy view on exit from each gate area. Visual X X X X A-GA.02 Signs indicating direction to baggage claim/terminal exit are located at frequent intervals and outside restrooms. Visual X X X X A-GA.03 At major decision points, multisensory destination/directional information is provided via map, directory, kiosk, or information desk. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X A-GA.04 Directional and identification signs have fonts that are easily read, have good contrast, are non-glare, and allow close approach wherever possible. Visual X X X X 2010 ADA Accessibility Standards (ADAAS) 703.5 A-GA.05 Directional and identification signs include pictograms to aid comprehension by persons with intellectual disabilities and international travelers. Visual X A-GA.06 Identification signs are visual and tactile, i.e., have raised characters and Braille and correctly positioned. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 703 A-GA.07 FIDSs are located at frequent intervals along concourses (for passengers who need to check on other arriving flights). Virtual X X X X A-GA.08 FIDSs are hung at eye level for close approach, with larger fonts, good contrast, and slower refresh rate. Virtual X X X X A-GA.09 FIDSs information is available via mobile application or verbally via dedicated telephone number. Virtual X X X X A-GA.10 Visual paging is available at frequent intervals along concourses, e.g., built into FIDS. Pages may also be provided on the airport website or via a mobile application. Virtual X A-GA.11 Paging system allows passengers to request audible or visual page by phone, text, or email. Virtual Verbal X X X X A-GA.12 Courtesy phones are located at regular intervals along concourse including major decision points and identified by visual and tactile signage. Verbal X X X X A-GA.13 Differences in floor texture and color help provide an "edge" for wayfinding and distinguish the concourse walkway from holding areas. Visual X X? A-GA.14 Detectable floor surface changes (color, texture) are in place at approaches to escalators, moving walkways, and stairs. Visual X X X X A-GA.15 An audible signal alerts passengers to the end of moving walkways. Visual X X X X A-GA.16 Accessible means of egress (e.g., evacuation elevators, areas of safe refuge, exit stairways, horizontal exits, etc.) have appropriate identification and directional signage in view from concourse walkways and/or holding rooms. Visual X X X X International Building Code (IBC)- 2000 (including 2001 Supplement to the International Codes) and IBC- 2003 A-GA.17 Accessible routes coincide with or are located in the same area as general circulation paths. Elevators and lifts must be in the same area as stairs and escalators. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 206.3

A-18 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed A-GA.18 Where elevators are not near or in sight of stairs and escalators, directional signage is provided. Visual X X X X A-GA.19 Elevators meet ADA Standards for signage, controls, visible and audible indicators, two- way communication systems, etc. Announcement of floor is preferable to beeping sound. Visual Verbal X X X X 2010 ADAAS 407, 408, 409, 708 A-GA.20 Audible indicators outside elevators are loud enough to be heard over ambient noise. Visual X X X X A-GA.21 Signs at exit doors and areas of safe rescue are tactile as well as visual, and instructions for summoning assistance in areas of safe rescue are also tactile with accessible two- way communication system in place. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X 2010 ADAAS 216.4, 703.1, 703.2, 703.5, 708 A-GA.22 Airport, airline, and concessions staff have training on the Airport Evacuation Plan (AEP) and how to assist passengers with disabilities in case of emergency. Verbal X X X X ACRP Reports 112, 73, 95 A-GA.23 Visual and audible signaling systems are under central control to help direct people along best route. Push notification sends emergency information and directions to mobile phones. Visual Virtual X X X X ACRP Report 112 A-GA.24 Where people movers to or along the concourse are optional, dynamic signage indicates flights or gates for which the tram or monorail ride is recommended. Walking times/distances are provided. Virtual X X X X Example: FIDSs at DTW display a tram icon for flights from distant gates. A-GA.25 Station and other announcements on the automated people mover are both visual and virtual. Virtual X X X X Example, MCO A-GA.26 A designated seating area and wheelchair area with grab bar are provided in the cars. Visual X X X X A-GA.27 Effective directional signage is in place, especially where a level change is involved. Visual X X X X A-GA.28 On long concourses, maps with point-of- interest directories are placed at regular intervals. Virtual X X X X A-GA.29 SARAs available airside are centrally located to minimize walking times, have appropriate directional and identification signage, and appear on maps/directories. Visual X X X X 49 CFR Part 27.71. Also see FAA Draft Advisory Circular AC-150/5360- 14A, Appendix A for proposed standards for SARAs. A-GA.30 Restrooms, companion restrooms, and drinking fountains are grouped at frequent intervals along concourses with men’s and women’s facilities in a standard relation to each other, e.g., men’s to left of women’s. Visual X X X X A-GA.31 ATMs and currency exchange counters meet ADA accessibility standards. Virtual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 707 A-GA.32 Large, easy-to-read signs with pictograms identify each exit from concourse/secure area and warn that there is no return after exit. Visual X X X X A-GA.33 TSA agent is positioned to ensure that exiting passengers do not attempt to reenter concourse/secure zone. Verbal X X X X Section 6.3: Baggage Claim (BC) A-BC.01 Directional signage for baggage carousels, e.g., by number, is prominently displayed at each entrance to baggage claim from concourse/secure zone. Visual Virtual X X X X A-BC.02 Correctly oriented “You Are Here” illuminated map with large font designed for close approach shows facilities and services on terminal arrivals level including baggage claim. Visual X X X X

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-19 Carousels have a designated area for persons with disabilities or others who need assistance in retrieving their bags. REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed A-BC.03 An accessible directory (large font, high contrast, and hung at eye level for close approach) lists arriving flights and carousel assignments. Virtual X X X X A-BC.04 Airport or airline staff are available to give information/directions. Verbal X X X X A-BC.05 Baggage claim information is sent by text message, or passenger can check carousel location via mobile application after arrival. Virtual X X X X A-BC.06 Number of each carousel is prominently displayed and clear lines of sight allow easy viewing on entry to baggage claim. Virtual X X X X A-BC.07 Dynamic signage at each carousel lists the flight(s) assigned to it. If carousel signage does not allow close approach by passenger, e.g., is placed in the center of carousels, font size and contrast allow easy viewing from a distance. Virtual X A-BC.08 Flat carousels without a raised edge to keep bags on the belt require less physical effort and are more universally accessible. Visual X X X X ACRP Synthesis 51 A-BC.09 Visual X X X Example, Barcelona-El Prat A-BC.10 Baggage handlers are available to provide assistance in retrieving and transporting checked luggage. Verbal X X X X A-BC.11 Airline service company staff are available to help retrieve and provide assistance with checked baggage to a curbside/ground service connection (or other terminal for connecting flight). Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.91 A-BC.12 Luggage carts, free or fee-based, are available at central locations in the baggage claim area. Visual X X X X A-BC.13 Seating areas are available near carousels for those waiting for checked luggage. Visual X X X X A-BC.14 Accessible men’s, women’s, and companion restrooms are available in the baggage claim area and have appropriate directional and identification signage. Visual X X X X A-BC.15 Accessible facilities for reporting lost or damaged luggage or assistive device, are available in the baggage claim area and have appropriate directional and identification signage. Verbal X X X X A-BC.16 Lost or damaged luggage or assistive devices can be reported via mobile application, website, and phone as well as in person. Virtual X X X X A-BC.17 A CRO is available in person or remotely (e.g., by phone, TTY, text) to resolve issues involving damage or loss of an assistive device. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.151, 382.153. A-BC.18 BIDSs are located at baggage claim entrance. Visual Virtual X X X X Section 6.4: Lobby Area (LA) A-LA.01 Directional signage leads from baggage claim to information desk, ground transportation counters, and other points of interest and to ground transportation pick-up areas and SARAs outside terminal or on departures level. Visual X X X X A-LA.02 An accessible information desk is available to assist passengers with ground transportation, hotels, etc. Verbal Visual X X X X A-LA.03 The information desk has prominent identification signage with a pictogram. Visual X X X X

A-20 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed A-LA.04 Staff have disability awareness training and computer access to airport access database. Verbal Virtual X X X X A-LA.05 Staff is fluent in English and other local languages and has access to interpreters for many languages through means such as the AT&T language line. Verbal Virtual X X X X A-LA.06 The information desk has video remote interpreting service. Virtual Verbal X A-LA.07 A counter induction loop is in place for persons who have hearing aids or cochlear implants with T-coils. A hearing loop graphic sign is displayed on the counter. Verbal X A-LA.08 Correctly oriented “You Are Here” illuminated maps and directories for arrival-level facilities, ground transportation pick-up locations, and SARAs are located near the information desk and inside each terminal entrance. Visual Virtual X X X X A-LA.09 Seating areas, with some seats designated as disability priority, are located near the information desk and terminal entrances. Visual X X X X A-LA.10 The shuttle kiosk (for hotels, rental car companies, etc.) has a TTY as well as phone. Phone numbers for all free shuttles serving the airport are provided in the airport mobile application, if there is one. Visual Virtual X X X X A-LA.11 Where public pay phones are provided, ADA requirements for wheelchair-accessible phones, volume control, and TTYs are also met. Virtual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 217 and 704 A-LA.12 ATMs meet ADA accessibility standards. Virtual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 707 A-LA.13 Ground transportation counters (e.g., rental cars, paid bus and van shuttle services) meet ADA accessibility standards. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 207 A-LA.14 Directional signage indicates the specific terminal exit to use for each mode of ground transportation and for SARAs. Visual X X X X A-LA.15 Directional signage is also in place for any modes of transportation that pick up from/connect to a different level of the terminal. Visual X X X X A-LA.16 Accessible routes coincide with or are located in the same area as general circulation paths. Elevators and lifts must be in the same area as stairs and escalators. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 206.3 A-LA.17 Where elevators are not near or in sight of stairs and escalators, directional signage is provided. Visual X X X X A-LA.18 Primary exit doors have clear identification of terminal and level and have a unique door number. Visual X X X Section 6.5: Ground Transportation (GT) A-GT.01 Accessible pick-up points for people with disabilities have been designated by the airport; are included in the access database and on web, mobile and terminal maps; and are signed for easy viewing from roadways and by passengers waiting for pick-up. Visual Virtual X X X X Passenger loading zones scoping and design: 2010 ADAAS 209 and 503 A-GT.02 There is a designated pick-up point for motor coaches to meet tour groups and deploy a lift as needed. Visual X X X X A-GT.03 SARAs are located as close as possible to terminal exit doors and have appropriate directional and identification signage. Visual X X X X A-GT.04 Walking surfaces are stable, firm, and slip- resistant and have no openings more than 1/2”. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 302.3

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-21 REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed A-GT.05 Visual and auditory signals are in place at pedestrian crossings with traffic lights, with adequate crossing time for those who move more slowly. Visual Virtual X X X X A-GT.06 Where there are no signals, pedestrian crossing signs are prominently displayed for drivers and pedestrians. Raised pedestrian crossings help to slow traffic while providing level access. Speed bump signage and road markings should be in place. Visual X X X X A-GT.07 Pedestrian crossings have higher illumination levels and/or different colors. Visual X X X X A-GT.08 Detectable warnings are in place at curb ramps and marked crosswalks. Visual X X? DOT ADA Standards (2006) 406.8 NPRM Public Rights of Way A-GT.09 If sidewalk is flush with roadway, detectable warnings are in place along the edge. Visual X X? A-GT.10 At least one accessible route is provided from the terminal to accessible parking spaces and accessible passenger loading zones, sidewalks, and public transportation stops. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 206.2.1 A-GT.11 Air carriers or their contracted service companies provide assistance to all curbside pick-up points. Verbal Virtual X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.91. DOT FAQ 28 http://www.dot.gov/airconsumer/freq uently-asked-questions-may-13- 2009 A-GT.12 Directional and identification signs have fonts that are easily read, have good contrast, are non-glare, and allow close approach wherever possible. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 703 A-GT.13 Identification signs for each mode of transportation are prominently displayed for both drivers and pedestrians. Visual X X X X A-GT.14 Where specific hotels, parking lots, or rental car companies are assigned a particular pick- up point (rather than all hotels at one point, all rental cars at another, etc.), a directory is provided inside the terminal and at each location (e.g., Marriott, Hilton – Stop A; Embassy Suites, Sheraton – Stop B). Visual Virtual X X X X A-GT.15 Airport staff are available curbside to provide information and directions. Verbal X X X X A-GT.16 Seating areas, with some seats designated as disability priority, are provided near transportation stops. Visual X X X X A-GT.17 Where bus shelters are provided, they meet ADA accessibility standards. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 810 A-GT.18 Transportation systems/vehicles provided by or contracted by the airport meet ADA Standards. Visual X X X X 49 CFR Part 37, Part 38 A-GT.19 Fee-based private shuttles (bus and van) serving the airport meet ADA Standards. Where there is more than one route per stop, the destination of each vehicle is clearly announced. Visual X X X X 49 CFR Part 37, Part 38 A-GT.20 At taxi stands, people with disabilities can go to the head of the line, and a priority access sign with wheelchair symbol is in place at head of queue/dispatch stand. Visual Verbal X X X A-GT.21 Where accessible taxis are available, a system is in place and dispatchers are trained to give priority to those vehicles to persons who use wheelchairs or have large service animals. Verbal X X X X A-GT.22 Virtual X X X X A-GT.23 Wheelchair and escort assistance (including help with luggage) is available from airline or service company to remote pick-up points. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.91. DOT FAQ 28 http://www.dot.gov/airconsumer/freq uently-asked-questions-may-13- 2009 Remote ground transport pick-up locations are identified on airport maps and on website and mobile application.

A-22 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed A-GT.24 Staff member is on hand to direct passengers, e.g., at AirTrain stations. Verbal X X X X Examples: JFK, EWR A-GT.25 There is at least one accessible route from airport terminals to remote pick-up points with each element (walking surfaces, ramps, lifts, elevators, doors, etc.) meeting either 1991 or 2010 ADAAS. Visual X X 2010 ADAAS 206.2.1 A-GT.26 There are no objects protruding more than 4” into the path of travel that are not cane detectable (lower edge 27” or less above finished floor), e.g. fire extinguishers, pay phones, drinking fountains. Visual X ADAAS 307 A-GT.27 Overhead clearance is 80” minimum, and unenclosed stairs or escalators have a rail or barrier underneath. Visual X X X X ADAAS 307.4 A-GT.28 Seating areas for resting, with some seats signed for disability priority, are provided at frequent intervals and located out of the circulation path. Visual X X X X No ADA standard. Building and Construction Authority. Code on Barrier-Free Accessibility In Buildings, Singapore, 2002, recommends seating areas no more than 30 m (328 ft) apart. A-GT.29 Directional signs to guide travelers to different modes of transportation/pick-up points are located at frequent intervals and at any decision points en route. Visual X X X X A-GT.30 Directional signs have large, unadorned, illuminated fonts. Visual X X X X A-GT.31 Directional and identification signs include pictograms to aid comprehension by persons with intellectual disabilities and international travelers. Visual X A-GT.32 Identification signs are visual and tactile, i.e., have raised characters and Braille, and are correctly positioned. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 703 A-GT.33 Corridors and hallways are evenly illuminated with gradual transitions from dark to bright spaces, especially those that have high levels of natural light. Visual X X X X A-GT.34 Accessible routes coincide with or are located in the same area as general circulation paths. Elevators and lifts must be in the same area as stairs and escalators. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 206.3 A-GT.35 Where elevators are not near or in sight of stairs and escalators, directional signage is provided. Visual X X X X A-GT.36 Elevators meet ADA Standards for signage, controls, visible and audible indicators, two- way communication systems, etc. Announcement of floor is preferable to beeping sound. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 407, 408, 409, 708 A-GT.37 Audible indicators outside elevators are loud enough to be heard over ambient noise. Visual X X X X A-GT.38 Accessible means of egress (e.g., evacuation elevators, areas of safe refuge, exit stairways, horizontal exits, etc.) are available and have appropriate identification and directional signage. Visual X X X X International Building Code (IBC)- 2000 (including 2001 Supplement to the International Codes) and IBC- 2003 A-GT.39 Detectable warnings are in place at curb ramps, marked crosswalks, and wherever the accessible route crosses vehicular roadways in parking structures. Visual X X? DOT ADA Standards (2006) 406.8 NPRM Public Rights of Way A-GT.40 Detectable floor surface changes (color, texture) are in place at approaches to escalators, moving walkways, and stairs. Visual X X X X A-GT.41 An audible signal alerts passengers to the end of moving walkways. Visual X X X X A-GT.42 Emergency communications equipment is provided at strategic locations wherever potential security or safety threats may exist and is identified by visual and tactile signage. Locations are noted in the access database and mobile application, if any. Virtual X X X X Standard for two-way communications system 2010 ADAAS 708

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-23 REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed A-GT.43 Seating areas, with some seats designated as disability priority, are provided at transportation stops. Visual X X X X A-GT.44 Accessible men’s, women’s, and companion restrooms and drinking fountains are available near the remote pick-up location or en route and have appropriate directional and identification signs. Visual A-GT.45 Where bus shelters are provided, they meet ADA accessibility standards. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 810 A-GT.46 Airport or ground transportation staff are on hand at stations/stops to provide information or directions or a courtesy phone/kiosk is available. Verbal Virtual X X X X A-GT.47 Fare machines meet ADA accessibility standards, or cash fares can be paid to the driver. Virtual Verbal X X X X 2010 ADAAS 707 Section 6.6: Rental Car (RC)—On-Site and Remote A-RC.01 There is at least one accessible route from the rental car facility to airport terminal. Visual X X X X A-RC.02 Directional signs are in place from the rental car drop-off area to the closest terminal entrance. Visual X X X X A-RC.03 Facility entrances, paths of travel, counters, and other features meet ADA Standards. Visual X X X X A-RC.04 An accessible means of transport links the rental car facility with airport terminals, e.g., shuttle bus or automated people mover. Visual X X X X Section 6.7: Parking (PK) A-PK.01 Accessible parking spaces in parking lots and parking garages adjacent to the terminal are connected by an accessible path of travel to terminal entrances with each element (e.g., walking surfaces, ramps, lifts, elevators, doors, etc.) meeting either 1991 or 2010 ADAAS. Visual X A-PK.02 Accessible parking spaces are located on the shortest possible route(s) to accessible terminal entrance(s) and dispersed if there is more than one accessible entrance. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 208.3.1 A-PK.03 All accessible van spaces may be grouped on one level in a multi-car parking facility. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 208.3.1 A-PK.04 Visual X A-PK.05 The number of accessible van and car spaces meets minimum local, state, or federal scoping (whichever is highest) and standards for size and identification signage. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 208.2 A-PK.06 Directional signs are in place from the terminal entrance to adjacent parking garage and parking lots. Visual X X X 2010 ADAAS 703 A-PK.07 Parking fare machines meet ADA accessibility standards. Virtual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 707 A-PK.08 The signage system in parking garages and lots allows drivers to easily locate their vehicle or a car finder application is available. Visual Virtual X X X A-PK.09 Directional signs to parking exits are in easy view for drivers. Visual A-PK.10 Drive-through fare machines are accessible to persons with limited use of arms/hands, or a staffed booth is available. Visual Verbal X 2010 ADAAS 707 A-PK.11 Accessible parking spaces are on the shortest possible accessible route to shuttle bus stops, automated people mover station, or other accessible means of transportation linking parking lots to airport terminals. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 208.3.1 All accessible parking locations are identified in the airport access database, on maps, and in the mobile application, if any.

A-24 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed A-PK.12 The number of accessible van and car spaces in remote lots meets minimum local, state, or federal scoping (whichever is highest) and ADA Standards for size and identification signage. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 208.2 A-PK.13 Accessible parking spaces do not have to be provided in each parking facility on the site but must have equivalence in terms of distance, parking fees, and user convenience. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 208.3.2 A-PK.14 Transportation systems/vehicles provided by or contracted by the airport meet ADA Standards. Visual X X X X 49 CFR Part 37, Part 38 A-PK.15 Shuttle stops and shelters meet ADA accessibility standards. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 810 A-PK.16 Directional signs to parking exits are in easy view for drivers. Visual X X X A-PK.17 Drive-through fare machines are accessible to persons with limited use of arms/hands, or a manned booth is available. Visual Verbal X 2010 ADAAS 707 Section 6.8 International Flights (IN) / 6.8.1 Immigration A-IN.01 Single route leads from arrival gate to Immigration. Visual X X X X A-IN.02 Airline service provider meets plane and provides wheelchair assistance or escort from seat or door of plane, as needed, to immigration. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.91 A-IN.03 In case of ad hoc request(s), airline or service agent calls for additional personnel to provide assistance. Verbal X X X X A-IN.04 Passenger’s wheelchair, if any, is returned at door of plane. For mobility equipment stowed as cargo, elevator or lift near jet bridge allows prompt delivery from tarmac. Visual Verbal X 14 CFR Part 382.125(c) A-IN.05 A CRO is available in person or remotely (e.g., by phone, TTY, text) to resolve issues involving damage or loss of an assistive device, assistance in the terminal, etc. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.151, 382.153. CROs must be made available at any point in the traveler's trip when a disability-related problem arises as well as during the reservation and booking process. A-IN.06 Seating areas for resting, with some seats signed for disability priority, are provided at frequent intervals and located out of the circulation path, unless not permitted by the TSA. Visual X X X X No ADA standard. Building and Construction Authority. Code on Barrier-Free Accessibility In Buildings, Singapore, 2002, recommends seating areas no more than 30 meters (328 feet) apart. A-IN.07 Corridors and hallways are evenly Illuminated with gradual transitions from dark to bright spaces, especially those that have high levels of natural light. Visual X X X X A-IN.08 Accessible routes coincide with or are located in the same area as general circulation paths. Elevators and lifts must be in the same area as stairs and escalators. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 206.3 A-IN.09 Where elevators are not near or in sight of stairs and escalators, directional signage is provided. Visual X X X X A-IN.10 Elevators meet ADA Standards for signage, controls, visible and audible indicators, two- way communication systems, etc. Announcement of floor is preferable to beeping sound. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 407, 408, 409, 708 A-IN.11 Audible indicators outside elevators are loud enough to be heard over ambient noise. Visual X X X X

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-25 REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed A-IN.12 There are no objects protruding more than 4” into the path of travel that are not cane detectable (lower edge 27” or less above finished floor), e.g., fire extinguishers, pay phones, drinking fountains. Visual X 2010 ADAAS 307 A-IN.13 No overhead clearance is less than 80” and there are no unenclosed stairs or escalators without a rail or barrier underneath. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAS 307.4 A-IN.14 Accessible men’s and women’s restrooms and companion restroom, appropriately signed, and drinking fountains are available in or before immigration area. Visual X X X X A-IN.15 There are dedicated lanes for employees and people with disabilities or staff direct people with disabilities and those who self-identify as such to front of line. Visual Verbal X X X X A-IN.16 Where available, signs indicate lanes for employees and people with disabilities. This benefits those not being escorted, especially those with hidden disabilities. Visual X X X X A-IN.17 Accessible passport kiosks enable U.S. passengers to scan passport and customs forms and print a receipt to show officers. Virtual X X X X A-IN.18 Staff are on hand to assist people with disabilities and others unfamiliar with the passport kiosks. Verbal X X X X A-IN.19 Mobile Passport Application enables U.S. passengers to submit passport information and customs declaration forms electronically and receive an electronic receipt to show officers. Virtual X? X X? X Application not yet accessible for passengers who are blind at time of report publication. Not tested by passengers with cognitive disabilities Section 6.8 International Flights (IN) / 6.8.2 Baggage Claim A-IN.20 The route leads directly from immigration to baggage claim. Visual X X X X A-IN.21 An accessible directory (large font, high contrast, and hung at eye level for close approach) lists arriving flights and carousel assignments. Virtual X X X X A-IN.22 Baggage claim information is sent by text message or passenger can check carousel location via mobile application after arrival. Virtual X X X X A-IN.23 Airport or airline staff are available to give information/directions. Verbal X X X X A-IN.24 Dynamic signage at each carousel lists the flight(s) assigned to it. Virtual X X X X A-IN.25 If carousel signage does not allow for close approach by passenger, e.g., is placed in the center of carousels, font size and contrast allow easy viewing from a distance. Virtual X X X X A-IN.26 Flat carousels without a raised edge to keep bags on the belt require less physical effort and are more universally accessible. Visual X X X X ACRP Synthesis 51 A-IN.27 Carousels have a designated area for persons with disabilities or others who need assistance in retrieving their bags. Visual X X X Example, Barcelona-El Prat A-IN.28 Baggage handlers are available to provide assistance in retrieving and transporting checked luggage. Verbal X X X X A-IN.29 Airline service company staff help retrieve and provide assistance with checked baggage to a curbside/ground service connection (or other terminal for a connecting flight). Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.91 A-IN.30 Luggage carts, free or fee-based, are available at central locations in the baggage claim area. Visual X X X X A-IN.31 Seating areas are available near carousels for those waiting for checked luggage. Visual X X X X

A-26 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed A-IN.32 Accessible men’s, women’s, and companion restrooms are available in the baggage claim area and have appropriate directional and identification signage. Visual X X X X A-IN.33 Accessible facilities for reporting lost or damaged luggage or assistive devices are available in the baggage claim area or after exiting customs and have appropriate directional and identification signage. Verbal X X X X A-IN.34 Lost or damaged luggage or assistive devices can be reported via mobile application, website, or phone as well as in person. Virtual X X X X A-IN.35 A CRO is available in person or remotely (by phone, TTY, text, etc.) to resolve issues involving damage or loss of an assistive device. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.151, 382.153. A-IN.36 Directional signage to the customs and baggage claim exit is prominently displayed (in view from all carousels). Visual X X X X Chapter 7 Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist CONNECTING PASSENGER (C) Section 7.1: Airline Support (AS) C-AS.01 Gate numbers are provided onboard the aircraft by flight attendants or by agents in the gate area after arrival, verbally or visually as needed. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.69, 382.119 C-AS.02 Gate numbers are sent by text message, or passengers can check flight information via mobile phone after arrival. Virtual X X X X C-AS.03 Passengers consult the nearest FIDS after exiting the arriving gate. Virtual X X X X C-AS.04 Agents give directions to the connecting gate. Verbal X X X X C-AS.05 Passengers use a mobile application, if there is one, for directions/route to the connecting gate. Virtual X X X X C-AS.06 Airline service employees provide wheelchair assistance or escort from the seat or the door of the plane, as needed, to the connecting gate. Service by electric cart replaces wheelchair service for ambulatory passengers in some airports. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.91 C-AS.07 In case of ad hoc request(s), an airline or service agent calls for additional personnel to provide assistance. Verbal X X X X C-AS.08 Passenger wheelchairs are returned at the door of the plane. For those stowed as cargo, an elevator or lift near the jet bridge allows prompt delivery from the tarmac. Verbal X 14 CFR Part 382.125(c) C-AS.09 In case of flight cancellation, the rebooking center is accessible with either a ticket agent or phone instead of/in addition to an inaccessible touch-screen kiosk. Alternatively, passengers can rebook by airline mobile application. Virtual Verbal X X X X C-AS.10 Where possible, passengers with disabilities are given priority in rebooking. Verbal X X X X In Europe, priority is mandated under EC 261/2004. C-AS.11 A counter induction loop is installed at one rebooking counter, with priority access for persons who are hard of hearing and have hearing aids or cochlear implants with T-coils. A hearing loop graphic sign is displayed on the counter. Verbal X C-AS.12 Rebooking centers have appropriate directional and identification signage and appear on maps/directories. Visual Virtual X X X X

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-27 REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed C-AS.13 Staff from the airline service company are recalled by gate agents to provide an escort to the rebooking center and the new gate. Verbal X X X X C-AS.14 Gate agents direct passengers to rebooking centers. Verbal C-AS.15 A CRO is available in person or remotely (by phone, TTY, text, etc.) to resolve disability-related issues. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.151, 382.153. Section 7.2: Gate Area (GA) C-GA.01 At major decision points, multisensory destination/directional information is provided via a map, kiosk, or information booth. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X C-GA.02 Visual X X X X 2010 ADAS 703 C-GA.03 Directional and identification signs include pictograms to aid comprehension by persons with intellectual disabilities and international travelers. Visual X C-GA.04 Identification signs are visual and tactile, i.e., have raised characters and Braille, and are correctly positioned. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAS 703 C-GA.05 Directional signs have large, unadorned, illuminated fonts. Visual X X X X C-GA.06 FIDSs are located at frequent intervals along concourses. Virtual X X X X C-GA.07 FIDSs are hung at eye level for close approach, with larger fonts, good contrast, and a slower refresh rate. Virtual X X X X C-GA.08 FIDS information is available via a mobile application or verbally via a dedicated telephone number. Virtual X X X X C-GA.09 Virtual X Example: MSP posts all pages on its website. C-GA.10 The paging system allows passengers to request audible or visual page by phone, text, or email. Virtual Verbal X X X X C-GA.11 Courtesy phones are located at regular intervals along the concourse, including at major decision points, and identified by visual and tactile signage. Verbal X X X X C-GA.12 Directional signage for gate numbers is located at regular intervals, at all entrances onto the concourse from security, and at all decision points/nodes. Visual X X X X C-GA.13 Signs indicating the direction to baggage claim/terminal exit are located at frequent intervals and outside restrooms. Visual X X X X C-GA.14 Good lines of sight allow travelers to see a series of gate numbers along the concourse, i.e., gate numbers are not blocked by other signage or architectural elements. Visual X X X X C-GA.15 Gate numbers follow a regular pattern, e.g., even on left, odd on right. Visual X X X X C-GA.16 Seating areas for resting, with some seats signed for disability priority, are provided at frequent intervals and located out of the circulation path, e.g., where there are long corridors not adjoining holding areas. Visual X X X X No ADA standard. Building and Construction Authority. Code on Barrier-Free Accessibility In Buildings, Singapore, 2002, recommends seating areas no more than 30 m (328 ft) apart. C-GA.17 Differences in floor texture and color help provide an edge for wayfinding and distinguish the concourse walkway from holding areas. Visual X X? C-GA.18 Detectable floor surface changes (color, texture) are in place at approaches to escalators, moving walkways, and stairs. Visual X X X X Directional and identification signs have fonts that are easily read, good contrast, non- glare, and allow close approach wherever possible. Visual paging is available at frequent intervals along concourses, e.g., built into FIDSs. Pages may also be provided on the airport website or via a mobile application.

A-28 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed C-GA.19 Corridors and hallways are evenly illuminated with gradual transitions from dark to bright spaces, especially those that have high levels of natural light. Visual X X X X C-GA.20 Accessible routes coincide with, or are located in, the same area as general circulation paths. Elevators and lifts must be in the same area as stairs and escalators. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAAG 206.3 C-GA.21 Where elevators are not near or in sight of stairs and escalators, directional signage is provided. Visual X X X X C-GA.22 Elevators meet ADA Standards for signage, controls, visible and audible indicators, two- way communication systems, etc. Announcement of floors is preferable to a beeping sound. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAS 407, 408, 409, 708 C-GA.23 There are no objects protruding more than 4” into the path of travel that are not cane detectable (lower edge 27” or less above finished floor), e.g. fire extinguishers, pay phones, drinking fountains. Visual X 2010 ADAS 307 C-GA.24 Overhead clearance is 80” minimum, and there are no unenclosed stairs or escalators without a rail or barrier underneath. Visual X X X X 2010 ADAS 307.4 C-GA.25 An audible signal alerts passengers to the end of moving walkways. Visual X X X X C-GA.26 Accessible means of egress (evacuation elevators, areas of safe refuge, exit stairways, horizontal exits, etc.) have appropriate identification and directional signage in view from concourse walkways and/or holding rooms. Visual X X X X International Building Code (IBC)- 2000 (including 2001 Supplement to the International Codes ) and IBC 2003 C-GA.27 Signs at exit doors and areas of safe rescue are tactile as well as visual. Instructions for summoning assistance in areas of safe rescue are also tactile with an accessible two-way communication system in place. Visual Virtual Verbal X X X X 2010 ADAS 216.4, 703.1, 703.2, 703.5, 708 C-GA.28 Airport, airline, and concessions staff have training on the Airport Evacuation Plan (AEP) and how to assist passengers with disabilities in case of emergency. Verbal X X X X ACRP Reports 112, 73, 95 C-GA.29 Visual and audible signaling systems are under central control to help direct people along best route. Push notification sends emergency information and directions to mobile phones. Visual Virtual X X X X C-GA.30 Correctly oriented “You Are Here” illuminated map with large font designed for close approach shows connecting gate information and facilities and services on the airside. Visual X X X X C-GA.31 Where people movers to or along the concourse are optional, dynamic signage indicates flights or gates for which the tram or monorail ride is recommended. Walking times/distances are provided. Virtual X X X X Example: FIDSs at DTW display a tram icon for flights from distant gates. C-GA.32 Station and other announcements on the automated people mover are both visual and virtual. Virtual X X X X Example, MCO C-GA.33 A designated seating area and wheelchair area with grab bar are provided in the cars. Visual X X X X C-GA.34 Effective directional signage is in place, especially where a level change is involved. Visual X X X X C-GA.35 On long concourses, maps with point-of- interest directories are placed at regular intervals. Virtual X X X X C-GA.36 SARAs available airside are centrally located to minimize walking times, have appropriate directional and identification signage, and appear on maps/directories. Visual X X X X FAA standards for SARAs in the secure zone and that specify a maximum walking distance are under development.

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-29 C-GA.37 An airport information desk or international Traveler’s Aid counter offers video remote interpretingservice. Virtual Verbal X Example, SFO C-GA.38 Restrooms, companion restrooms, and drinking fountains are grouped at frequent intervals along concourses, with men’s and women’s facilities in a standard relation to each other, e.g., men’s to left of women’s. Visual X X X X REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed C-GA.39 Restaurants, food kiosks, and convenience stores are distributed along concourses to provide close access from all gates. Visual X X X X C-GA.40 Restaurant menus are in large print, Braille, or posted in an accessible format online. Visual Virtual X 28 CFR Part 36.303 C-GA.41 For electronic menus, e.g., on an iPad, accessibility features such as VoiceOver are enabled and the device allows close approach for easy viewing. Virtual X C-GA.42 Restaurants that have wall menus also have a large print copy available on request. Visual X C-GA.43 Restaurant staff will read the menu. Verbal C-GA.44 Restaurant staff willingly accommodate service animals. Verbal X X X X 28 CFR Part 36.302 C-GA.45 Aisles in stores and spaces between tables in restaurants have a clear width of 36”. Visual X X 2010 ADAS 403.5.1 C-GA.46 Restaurant and retail staff have disability awareness training including how to guide people who are blind. Verbal X X X X C-GA.47 VIP lounges are fully accessible, have appropriate directional and identification signage, and are identified on the airport access database, maps, and directories. Visual X X X X C-GA.48 SARAs available airside are centrally located to minimize walking times, have appropriate directional and identification signage, and appear on maps/directories. Visual X X X X 49 CFR Part 27.71. Also see FAA Draft Advisory Circular AC-150/5360- 14A, Appendix A for proposed standards for SARAs. C-GA.49 Where SARAs are only available landside, service companies provide escort or wheelchair assistance out and then back through security. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.91 C-GA.50 A TSA policy is in place to allow people traveling with service/emotional support animals to bypass the line on return. Verbal X X X X C-GA.51 Gate agents provide confirmation that the passenger is at the correct gate as well as expected boarding and departure time. ti Verbal X X X X C-GA.52 The quality of the PA system and terminal acoustics allow announcements in the gate area to be easily understood. Visual X X X X C-GA.53 Gate areas have induction loops to allow PA announcements to be transmitted directly to persons using hearing aids with T-coils or cochlear implants. Graphic signage alerting passengers to the presence of the hearing loop is displayed on the podium. Verbal X C-GA.54 There is a general pre-boarding announcement for people with disabilities or personal notification by gate agents for those who self-identify as needing to pre-board. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.93 C-GA.55 GIDSs have real-time information, including which rows are boarding. Virtual X X X C-GA.56 Passengers with sensory disabilities who self- identify must be provided prompt access to information provided other passengers, personally by the gate agent if no other means is employed, e.g., GIDS, text message, PA system, etc. Verbal Virtual X X 14 CFR Part 382.53

A-30 enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and persons with disabilities REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed C-GA.57 Accessible recharging stations are available in the gate area for mobile devices and assistive equipment. Visual X X X X C-GA.58 TV monitors have high-contrast closed captioning enabled. Virtual X 14 CFR Part 382.51 C-GA.59 Visual paging is built into TV monitors. Virtual X C-GA.60 A designated seating area for people with disabilities is located near the podium or boarding gate. Visual X X X X C-GA.61 Airline or service company personnel assist passengers with disabilities to the door of the plane or seat, as needed. Verbal X X X X C-GA.62 Boarding bridge slopes should be as gentle as possible, with handrails at transitions and minimal gap/step into plane. Visual X X X X FAA Advisory Circular 150/5220-21C Aircraft Boarding Equipment C-GA.63 Passenger wheelchairs may be used until the door of plane, then gate-checked for stowage as cargo or if a manual chair or walker, may be stowed in the cabin on a first-come, first- serve basis. An elevator or lift near the jet bridge allows timely transfer of wheelchairs to the tarmac for stowage. Verbal X 14 CFR Part 382 Subpart I – Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices C-GA.64 A CRO is available in person or remotely (by phone, TTY, text, etc.) to resolve disability- related issues involving requested accommodations, assistive devices, carry-on baggage, denied boarding, etc. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.151, 382.153. Section 7.3: Terminal Transportation (TT) C-TT.01 Shuttle vans operating between concourses for customer convenience are accessible, have appropriate directional and identification signage, and are identified in the access database and on airport maps. Verbal Visual X X X X Section 7.4: Airline Support (AS)—Same Terminal, Different Airline C-AS.16 Gate numbers are sent by text message from the departing carrier, or passengers check flight information via mobile phone after arrival. Virtual X X X X C-AS.17 Passengers can consult nearest FIDS for connecting flight information after exiting the arriving gate. Virtual C-AS.18 Agents give directions to the connecting gate. Verbal X X X X C-AS.19 Passengers use a mobile application, if any, for directions/route to the connecting gate. Virtual C-AS.20 Airline service employees provide wheelchair assistance or escort from the seat or door of the plane, as needed, to the connecting gate. Service by electric cart replaces wheelchair service for ambulatory passengers in some airports. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.91. Connecting assistance by arriving carrier is still required if the departing flight is on a different carrier. See also DOT FAQ 27: http://www.dot.gov/airconsumer/frequ ently-asked-questions-may-13-2009. C-AS.21 In case of ad hoc request(s), an airline or service agent calls for additional personnel to provide assistance. Verbal X X X X C-AS.22 The passenger’s wheelchair, if any, is returned at door of plane. For mobility equipment stowed as cargo, elevator or lift near jet bridge allows prompt delivery from tarmac. Verbal X 14 CFR Part 382.125(c) C-AS.23 In case of a missed or cancelled connection, the rebooking center for the departing carrier is accessible with either a ticket agent or phone instead of/in addition to an inaccessible touch-screen kiosk, or the traveler can rebook by mobile application. Virtual Verbal X X X X

Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist A-31 REF # Recommendations & Requirements 3Vs Vision Hearing Cognition Mobility Standards Reference / Guidance Completed C-AS.24 Rebooking centers have appropriate directional and identification signage and appear on maps/directories. Visual Virtual X X X X C-AS.25 Staff from the arriving carrier’s service company will provide wheelchair service or escort to the departing carrier’s rebooking center and new gate. Verbal X X X X 14 CFR Part 382.91 C-AS.26 Passengers locate rebooking center for departing carrier and route to it on a mobile application. Virtual Remainder of passenger journey follows segment order listed above, beginning with Gate Area - Concourse *Connecting – Different Terminal: If the passenger’s departing flight is from another terminal, the arriving carrier must still provide connecting assistance to the passenger with a disability, either to the check-in counter or the gate, depending on the circumstance. For this scenario, see both the Arriving Passenger and Departing Passenger checklists. Means of transportation between terminals, if any, must meet ADA accessibility standards. To enable quicker and easier transfer of the passenger with both their carry-on and checked luggage, it may be advisable to have a dedicated shuttle van service between terminals, especially at large international airports where numerous passengers with disabilities are being assisted between domestic and international flights. Example: JFK.

Next: Appendix B - Application Review Criteria »
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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 177: Enhancing Airport Wayfinding for Aging Travelers and Persons with Disabilities provides guidance to assist aging travelers and persons with disabilities to travel independently within airports using pedestrian wayfinding systems. The guidebook addresses travel by people with cognitive, sensory, and other mobility challenges.

The Wayfinding Accessibility Audit Checklist documents issues that should be considered in a baseline airport wayfinding accessibility audit; it is provided in Word format so that users can check items off the list. The research team collected ratings of airport wayfinding applications from users of those applications on the Application Review Criteria testing and comment form. A PowerPoint presentation provides an overview of the ACRP research produced as a part of this report.

Disclaimer - This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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