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Page 135
Suggested Citation:"Endnotes." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Best Practices in Rural Regional Mobility. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24944.
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Page 135

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135 Endnotes 1. Although the study scope referred to such services as intra-state, we anticipate that some systems or providers have developed regional services that cross state lines, and so we may well document such cases and include relevant best practices needed for such services (e.g., meeting Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration requirements). 2. Firestine, T. The U.S. Rural Population and Scheduled Intercity Transportation in 2010: A Five-Year Decline in Transportation Access. U.S. Department of Transportation. Research and Innovative Technology Administra- tion, February 2011, p. 3. 3. Fravel, F. Intercity Bus Links: Moving into New Territory. TR News, No. 225, MarchApril 2003, p. 24–29. 4. Mattson, J. Rural Transit Fact Book 2014. Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, Small Urban and Rural Transit Center, North Dakota State University, for the U.S. Department of Transportation, August 2014, p. 10. 5. Hillman, N., and Weichman, T. Education Deserts: The Continued Significance of “Place” in the Twenty- First Century. Viewpoints: Voices from the Field, American Council on Education, Washington, D.C., 2016. 6. Thomas, S. R., Kaufman, B. G., Randolph, R. K., Thompson, K., Perry, J. R., Pink, G. H. A Comparison of Closed Rural Hospitals and Perceived Impact. Findings Brief, NC Rural Health Research Program, April 2015. 7. The use of the Five Myths format is inspired by the ongoing “Five Myths About” section in the Outlook section of the Sunday Washington Post. 8. Ohio Department of Transportation. Ohio Statewide Transit Needs Study, Final Report, January 2015, p.15. 9. More details on these requirements can be found in Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Regula- tions and Interlining Transportation for Rural Transit Providers, National Rural Transit Assistance Pro- gram (National RTAP) Technical Brief, 11/20/2008, available at: demopro.nationalrtap.org/emailResource. aspx?design=1&fileid=177 and Van and Bus Service Across State Lines, National Resource Center for Human Service Transportation Coordination, Community Transportation Association of America (CTAA), 6/1/2010, available at: http://web1.ctaa.org/webmodules/webarticles/articlefiles/FMCSA_MythsAnd Realities_20100713.pdf. 10. Currently Greyhound Lines does not provide its schedule information through GTFS, preferring to use its own website, ticketing, and information system to provide information about the connections it offers with its interline partners. Amtrak does provide GTFS data, so connecting services do appear in Google Transit. 11. Resources to assist with the development of GTFS data include the following: Why GTFS? Technical Brief, National Rural Transit Assistance Program (National RTAP) Technical Brief, 3/21/2016, available at: demopro.nationalrtap.org/emailResource.aspx?design=1&fileid=1255 GTFS Builder Getting Started Guide. National Rural Transit Assistance Program (National RTAP), 11/13/2013, available at: demopro.nationalrtap.org/emailResource.aspx?design=1&fileid=882 GTFS Builder Checklist. National Rural Transit Assistance Program (National RTAP), 11/13/2013, avail- able at: demopro.nationalrtap.org/emailResource.aspx?design=1&fileid=880 12. U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration. Formula Grants for Rural Areas: Pro- gram Guidance and Application Instructions, Circular C 9040.1G, 10/24/14. 13. U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration. Formula Grants for Rural Areas: Pro- gram Guidance and Application Instructions, Circular C 9040.1G, Chapter VIII, Intercity Bus, 10/24/14. 14. U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration. Formula Grants for Rural Areas: Pro- gram Guidance and Application Instructions, Circular C 9040.1G, Chapter VIII, Intercity Bus, 10/24/14, Section 5, p. VIII–4. 15. U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration. Office of Planning, Environment & Realty, Air Quality-Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement (CMAQ) Program, Revised Interim Guidance on CMAQ Operating Assistance under MAP-21, July 2014, http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/ environment/air_quality/cmaq/policy_and_guidance/cmaq13ig.cfm.

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TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Research Report 861: Best Practices in Rural Regional Mobility addresses the role of state transit program policies and regional planning agencies in the development of services that fall in the middle ground between intercity bus service and rural public transportation. This middle ground is defined as rural regional services. The report provides lessons learned on how to address needs for rural regional mobility, and includes a checklist for developing a rural regional route.

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