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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2018. The Science of Science Communication III: Inspiring Novel Collaborations and Building Capacity: Proceedings of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24958.
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Appendix A

Agenda

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Thursday, November 16, 2017

Emcee: Frank Sesno (The George Washington University)

8:30–8:45 Welcome
Marcia McNutt, President, National Academy of Sciences
8:45–9:30 Future Directions in the Sciences of Science Communication: A Discussion of the NASEM Report
Communicating Science Effectively: A Research Agenda
Alan Leshner (American Association for the Advancement of Science, Emeritus)
Discussant: Baruch Fischhoff (Carnegie Mellon University)
9:30–10:10 A View from Philanthropy on the Future of Science Communication
Session Moderator: Elizabeth Christopherson (Rita Allen Foundation)
Discussion with John Burris (Burroughs Wellcome Fund) and Marc Kastner (Science Philanthropy Alliance)
10:10–10:40 Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2018. The Science of Science Communication III: Inspiring Novel Collaborations and Building Capacity: Proceedings of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24958.
×
10:40–12:00 Creating a Collaborative Community for the Sciences of Science Communication
Gerald Davis (University of Michigan) and Laurie Weingart (Carnegie Mellon University)
Discussants: David Guston (Arizona State University) and Kathleen Tierney (University of Colorado Boulder)
12:00–1:15 Lunch
1:15–2:45 Marshalling the Troops: How Can Traditional Disciplines Help Build the Scale of Research in Science Communication?
Session Moderator: Ken Prewitt (Columbia University)
Communicating with the Public About Energy
Wändi Bruine de Bruin (University of Leeds) and Granger Morgan (Carnegie Mellon University)
Communicating with the Public About Research on Immigration
Shanto Iyengar (Stanford University) and Doug Massey (Princeton University)
Communicating with the Public About Infectious Disease
Bob Hornik (University of Pennsylvania) and Susan Scrimshaw (Nevin Scrimshaw International Nutrition Foundation)
2:45–3:15 Break
3:15–3:55 Building Capacity for Science Communication Partnership Award 1: Evidence-Based Science Communication to Policy Makers
Elizabeth Suhay (American University), Emily Cloyd (American Association for the Advancement of Science), and Erin Nash (Durham University)
Discussants: Jim Cohen (The Kavli Foundation), Fay Cook (National Science Foundation), and David Herring (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2018. The Science of Science Communication III: Inspiring Novel Collaborations and Building Capacity: Proceedings of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24958.
×
3:55–4:55 Science in the News: Human Genome Editing
Cornelia Dean (The New York Times), Matthew Porteus (Stanford University), and Dietram Scheufele (University of Wisconsin–Madison)
4:55–5:00 Wrap-Up/Lessons Learned
Baruch Fischhoff (Carnegie Mellon University)
5:00–6:15 Reception
6:15–7:30 The Mistrust of Science
Introduction: Alan Leshner (American Association for the Advancement of Science, Emeritus)
Atul Gawande (Brigham and Women’s Hospital)

Friday, November 17, 2017

Emcee: Ashley Llorens (John Hopkins Applied Physics Lab)

7:15–8:30 Invitation Only Collaboration Breakfast for Leaders of Philanthropic Organizations
8:40–8:45 Welcome
Alan Leshner (American Association for the Advancement of Science, Emeritus)
8:45–9:20 Rethinking Evaluation: Using Networks, Big Data, and Social Media to Measure Dissemination and Impact
Session Moderator: Arthur Lupia (University of Michigan)
James Fowler (University of California, San Diego)
9:20–10:20 Science in the News: Artificial Intelligence and Driverless Cars
Jack Stewart (Wired), Illah Nourbakhsh (Carnegie Mellon University), and Peter Hancock (MIT2 Laboratory; University of Central Florida)
10:20–10:45 Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2018. The Science of Science Communication III: Inspiring Novel Collaborations and Building Capacity: Proceedings of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24958.
×
10:45–12:00 Incentives for Scientists and Engineers to Communicate About Their Research: Roundtable Discussion
Session Moderator: Andrew Hoffman (University of Michigan)
Discussion with Neil Donahue (Carnegie Mellon University), KerryAnn O’Meara (University of Maryland, College Park), Dietram Scheufele (University of Wisconsin–Madison), Ahna Skop (University of Wisconsin–Madison), and Emmanuel Taylor (Energetics Incorporated)
12:00–1:00 Lunch
1:00–1:40 Building Capacity for Science Communication Partnership Award 2: Evaluating New Approaches to Promoting Vaccination
Brendan Nyhan (Dartmouth College) and Christine Finley (Vermont Department of Health)
Discussants: Greg Boustead (Simons Foundation), Suzanne Ffolkes (Research!America), Paul Hanle (Climate Central), and Doron Weber (Alfred P. Sloan Foundation)
1:40–3:05 Focus on a Communication Challenge: Threats to Science’s Reputation
Session Moderator: Kathleen Hall Jamieson (University of Pennsylvania)
Reputation: What’s at Stake?
Susan Fiske (Princeton University)
What Is the Extent of the Problem?
Kevin Finneran (Issues in Science and Technology)
Threats to Science: Exploring Solutions
Marcia McNutt (National Academy of Sciences)
3:05–3:35 Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2018. The Science of Science Communication III: Inspiring Novel Collaborations and Building Capacity: Proceedings of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24958.
×
3:35–4:10 The Role of Scientists and the Media in Communicating Uncertainty
Session Moderator: Laura Helmuth (The Washington Post)
Charles Manski (Northwestern University)
4:10–5:10 Science in the News: Gene Drive
Fred Gould (North Carolina State University), Pam Belluck (The New York Times), and Dominque Brossard (University of Wisconsin–Madison)
5:10–5:15 Concluding Remarks
Dietram Scheufele (University of Wisconsin–Madison)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2018. The Science of Science Communication III: Inspiring Novel Collaborations and Building Capacity: Proceedings of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24958.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2018. The Science of Science Communication III: Inspiring Novel Collaborations and Building Capacity: Proceedings of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24958.
×
Page 79
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2018. The Science of Science Communication III: Inspiring Novel Collaborations and Building Capacity: Proceedings of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24958.
×
Page 80
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2018. The Science of Science Communication III: Inspiring Novel Collaborations and Building Capacity: Proceedings of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24958.
×
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2018. The Science of Science Communication III: Inspiring Novel Collaborations and Building Capacity: Proceedings of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24958.
×
Page 82
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2018. The Science of Science Communication III: Inspiring Novel Collaborations and Building Capacity: Proceedings of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24958.
×
Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2018. The Science of Science Communication III: Inspiring Novel Collaborations and Building Capacity: Proceedings of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24958.
×
Page 84
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Successful scientists must be effective communicators within their professions. Without those skills, they could not write papers and funding proposals, give talks and field questions, or teach classes and mentor students. However, communicating with audiences outside their profession - people who may not share scientists' interests, technical background, cultural assumptions, and modes of expression - presents different challenges and requires additional skills. Communication about science in political or social settings differs from discourse within a scientific discipline. Not only are scientists just one of many stakeholders vying for access to the public agenda, but the political debates surrounding science and its applications may sometimes confront scientists with unfamiliar and uncomfortable discussions involving religious values, partisan interests, and even the trustworthiness of science.

The Science of Science Communication III: Inspiring Novel Collaborations and Building Capacity summarizes the presentations and discussions from a Sackler Colloquium convened in November 2017. This event used Communicating Science Effectively as a framework for examining how one might apply its lessons to research and practice. It considered opportunities for creating and applying the science along with the barriers to doing so, such as the incentive systems in academic institutions and the perils of communicating science in polarized environments. Special attention was given to the organization and infrastructure necessary for building capacity in science communication.

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