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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
×
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
×
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
×
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Suggested Citation:"CHAPTER 2 Research Approach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24959.
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12 CHAPTER 2 Research Approach Overview of Research Approach This section briefly explains the research approach. Figure 2 presents a flow chart to describe the research plan. The subsequent sections explain the components within the flow chart. Suggested future research is shown in the less shaded boxes and is described in Chapter 4. The individual tasks included in the overall research approach are as follows: (1) AIP selection to track the oxidation levels of laboratory-aged mixtures and field cores (2) Sensitivity study to estimate the sensitivity of the mechanical properties of asphalt concrete to asphalt binder oxidation (3) Selection of long-term aging method (4) Determination of project-specific aging durations by matching the AIPs measured from laboratory-aged loose mixtures with those from field cores (5) Climate-based determination of pre-defined aging durations to determine the required laboratory aging duration to match the field aging at any United States location of interest and depth of interest using EICM hourly pavement temperature data (6) Development of pavement aging model by calibrating the rheology-based kinetics model against the AIPs measured from different depths of field cores using temperature profiles obtained from the EICM

AIP Sele T comparis field core in order t developin ction he developm on of key A s. Therefore o select AIP g the long-t Figur ent of the l IPs of labor , an evaluat s to track th erm aging p e 2. Resear ong-term ag atory-aged b ion of candi e oxidation rocedure an 13 ch approac ing procedu inders and b date chemic levels of fie d associated h flow char re and kinet inders extra al and rheol ld- and labo kinetics mo t. ics model hi cted and re ogical AIPs ratory-aged del. A wide nged on the covered from was conduc materials w range of ted hen

14 laboratory- and field-aged materials were used to evaluate and subsequently select the AIPs. The chemical AIPs evaluated include the carbonyl absorbance area, C+S absorbance area, and C+S absorbance peaks determined using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR. The chemical AIPs were evaluated based on their correlation to the duration of the laboratory aging. The rheological AIPs evaluated included the dynamic shear modulus, zero shear viscosity, Glover-Rowe (G-R) parameter, and crossover modulus. The rheological AIPs were evaluated based on the strength of their relationship to the chemical changes that were induced by oxidation. Sensitivity Study The goal of the sensitivity study was to estimate the sensitivity of the mechanical properties of asphalt concrete to asphalt binder oxidation. The sensitivity study provided thresholds by which to evaluate the significance of observed differences in asphalt binder AIPs in terms of asphalt mixture performance. To accomplish this goal, experimental characterization was performed at multiple length scales, i.e., asphalt binder, asphalt mastic, and asphalt fine aggregate matrix (FAM). Here, asphalt mastic refers only to the portion of the asphalt mixture that includes the asphalt binder and the filler (i.e., finer than 75 mm particles). FAM includes portions of asphalt mastic, fine aggregate (< 0.6 mm), and some of the air voids. Testing was performed using (a) asphalt binder to establish baseline properties and evaluate the degree of oxidation, (b) asphalt mastic to consider physicochemical aspects, and (c) FAM to consider air voids and aggregate interaction effects. For all the tests, the asphalt binder was first oxidized using standard laboratory aging procedures (rolling thin film oven (RTFO) and PAV). The aging process was undertaken to create test materials that replicated, to the degree possible, asphalt binder that exists in asphalt pavements of relatively young, medium, and old ages. For this purpose, the relationships among PAV aging time, MAAT, and in-service aging time that was developed during NCHRP Project 9-23 were utilized (Houston et al. 2005). Correlations between the MAAT and asphalt binder grade were established to utilize this function, and the fact that these aging conditions affected the rheology of the asphalt was verified by determining the performance grade (PG) of the aged asphalt. After oxidizing the asphalt, it was either tested directly, blended with filler particles to create mastic, which was then tested, or blended with filler and fine aggregate to create FAM, which was then tested. The testing consisted of temperature and frequency sweep tests to establish the dynamic modulus values of the materials and time sweep tests to establish the fatigue properties of the materials. Subsequently, these experiments were analyzed to determine the sensitivity of the material responses to binder oxidation. Selection of the Proposed Aging Method An experimental program was executed to select the proposed aging method, in which the following factors were evaluated: (a) state of the material during aging (compacted specimen v. loose mix), (b) pressure level (oven aging vs. pressurized aging), and (c) aging temperature (95°C vs. 135°C). The integrity of the specimens following aging, the rate of oxidation quantified using AIPs of the extracted binder, versatility, ability to mimic field oxidation reactions, and the cost of the various procedures were compared in order to select the most promising aging procedure. The aforementioned analysis was conducted using hot mix asphalt

15 (HMA) mixtures. However, a complementary analysis of the long-term aging of WMA mixtures also was conducted. To assess the aging level achieved during the aging trials, comparisons were made between the AIPs of the binder extracted and recovered from long-term laboratory-aged mixtures, binder aged using the standard RTFO and PAV, and binder extracted and recovered from field cores acquired from in-service pavements. Loose Mix versus Compacted Specimen Aging Both compacted and loose mixture aging trials were conducted to determine the optimal state of the material to use for long-term aging. The specimen integrity following laboratory aging and the efficiency of oxidation were used to evaluate the state of the material. For the compacted specimens, two geometries were considered: standard 100-mm diameter specimens and small-specimen geometry 38-mm diameter specimens. The motivation behind the use of small specimens was to reduce the diffusion path. The primary concerns associated with the laboratory aging of compacted specimens are slump, changes in air void content, and the existence of an oxidation gradient. Therefore, the dimensions and air void contents of compacted specimens were compared before and after aging to determine if the specimens were damaged during the laboratory aging process. In addition, differences in the rheology and chemical compositions, along with the distance from the specimen periphery, were used to detect the presence (if any) of an aging gradient. For the loose mixtures, the primary specimen integrity concern was compactability. Therefore, the number of gyrations required to meet the target air void content was compared between the short- and long-term aged mixtures in order to assess compactability. In addition, air void content measurements were used to verify that the desired compaction level had been met. Dynamic modulus and cyclic fatigue tests were conducted using short- and long-term aged specimens to further assess if specimen integrity had been compromised as a result of the long-term aging procedures applied to both the loose mixtures and compacted specimens. The AIPs of the binder extracted and recovered from the long-term aged materials were used to assess the relative efficiency of the loose and compacted specimen aging procedures. Oven versus Pressure Aging The application of pressure to expedite the long-term aging of the loose mixtures and compacted specimens was evaluated by conducting aging trials in both an oven and a binder PAV. The ability of the PAV to improve the efficiency of laboratory aging was assessed through comparisons of extracted and recovered asphalt binder AIPs following long-term aging. Damage induced by the application and release of pressure to the compacted specimens also was assessed. Aging Temperature, 95°C versus 135°C Aging Several researchers have proposed the oven aging of loose (uncompacted) asphalt mixtures at 135°C for efficient laboratory long-term aging (e.g., Braham et al. 2009, Dukatz 2015, Blankenship 2015). However, the literature indicates that the oxidation reaction mechanism can change when the temperature exceeds 100°C, thus suggesting that accelerated aging at 135°C may lead to a fundamentally different aged asphalt binder than asphalt aged in

16 the field (at a lower temperature). Therefore, the performance implications of aging laboratory loose mixtures at 135°C were evaluated by comparing the dynamic modulus values and the cyclic fatigue performance of mixtures subjected to long-term aging at 95°C and 135°C to yield the same rheology. In this study, 95°C was selected instead of 100°C in order to avoid the aging temperature reaching close to 100°C due to possible temperature fluctuations in the oven. Although the rheology of the mixtures aged at 135°C and 95°C matched, their chemistry differed, and thus, the experiments allowed for the assessment of the significance of the chemical differences that are caused by aging at 135°C. The results then were used to inform the selection of the laboratory aging temperature. Determination of Project-Specific Aging Durations After selecting the most promising aging method, the aging procedure was applied to some selected component materials for a prolonged duration. Samples were removed periodically and subjected to extraction and recovery, after which the binder AIPs were measured and used to derive the oxidation kinetics. In addition, binders were extracted and recovered from varying depths of a selected group of field cores obtained from in-service pavements. The AIPs of the field-aged binders were measured and compared to the laboratory- aged oxidation rates to determine the laboratory aging duration that is required to match the target field AIPs for specific projects. Climate-Based Determination of Predefined Aging Durations The project-specific aging durations were used to calibrate a kinetics-derived climatic aging index (CAI) that can be used to determine the required laboratory aging duration to match the field aging at any location of interest and depth of interest using EICM hourly pavement temperature data. The CAI, which can be used to relate the pavement temperature history to the required laboratory aging duration, was derived using a simplification of a rigorous oxidation kinetics model that retains the exponential relationship between the oxidation rate and temperature. A diffusion correction factor is included within the CAI to allow the required laboratory aging duration to match different pavement depths of interest. The CAI analysis was used to generate maps of the United States that allow the visual determination of the required laboratory aging durations that match 4, 8, and 16 years of field aging at depths of 6 mm and 20 mm from the surface. Development of Pavement Aging Model Kinetics Modeling of Field Aging Using Mix-Specific Kinetics Parameters An existing kinetics model was applied successfully to predict loose mix aging rates at different temperatures using rheology-based AIPs. The kinetics model was then validated using a separate set of mixtures. The validated kinetics model provides a basis for the future development of a methodology that integrates the effects of long-term aging on performance in Pavement ME Design and other mechanistic design and analysis methods. Field aging levels were measured at different depths from field cores obtained at different service lives. Pavement temperatures obtained from the EICM as a function of depth were used along with the developed kinetics model

17 to predict field aging levels as a function of pavement depth. The predicted aging levels were compared against measured field aging in order to calibrate the predictive model. The calibrated kinetics model can be coupled with a diffusion model to enhance the prediction capabilities of the model to account for the effects of mixture morphological properties on field aging. Determination of Mix-Specific Kinetics Parameter from Universal Simple Aging Test (USAT) Binder Aging Aging loose mixture in the oven allows the physicochemical effects of filler on asphalt binder oxidation rates to be captured. Thus, this aging method is assumed to provide a good representation of field aging. However, loose mix aging requires the cumbersome extraction and recovery of the binder from the aged mixture prior to the AIP evaluation. Development of a model that can predict the effect of filler on asphalt binder oxidation would negate the need to perform loose mixture aging in order to relate laboratory aging to field-aging levels. In order to evaluate the idea of obtaining the binder aging rate from universal simple aging test (USAT) (Farrar et al. 2015) and relating it to the loose mix aging rate at a given temperature, binder and loose mix samples were short-term aged at 135°C for four hours followed by long-term aging in the same oven at 95°C. Then, both aged binders from the USAT as well as extracted and recovered binders from loose mix aging were tested using a dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) and FTIR spectroscopy. The aging rates obtained from this binder aging and loose mix aging were compared in order to find a relationship between the obtained aging rates. Test Materials and Field Projects The experimental plan involves two groups of materials. The Group A materials are a set of laboratory-prepared materials for which relatively large quantities of materials were available. The main purpose of investigating these materials was to evaluate different long-term aging scenarios. Also, the Group A materials allowed for a systematic sensitivity study to investigate the effects of changes in the AIPs on the performance of asphalt concrete. The Group B materials are the original component materials (i.e., binder and aggregate) and field cores extracted from in-service pavements. The Group B materials were used to develop the interim long-term aging procedure. Group A Materials Table 3 presents a summary of the Group A materials. Several binders are included to cover a wide range of aging characteristics. The limestone aggregate and PG 58-28 and PG 76- 16 binders used in the Asphalt Research Consortium study were used in the sensitivity study. The PG 64-22 binder and granite aggregate were acquired from North Carolina and used in the sensitivity study and for the evaluation of candidate aging methods. The SHRP binders AAD-1 and AAG-1 were used to study the effects of aging temperature due to their known differences in chemistry.

18 Table 3. Summary of Group A Materials Material Source Material Aggregate Asphalt Binder ARC Limestone PG 58-28, PG 76-16 North Carolina Granite PG 64-22 SHRP Granite PG 58-28 (AAD-1), PG 58-10 (AAG-1) Group B Materials/Projects Table 4 summarizes the Group B materials that are composed of the original binders and aggregate and field cores from the selected pavement sections. These sections cover a wide range of pavement design, climatic conditions, ages, binder and aggregate characteristics, air void contents, asphalt contents, and gradations. The Group B materials were used to develop the long- term aging procedure and for validation and calibration. Table 4. Selected Sections for Development of Long-Term Aging Protocol and Field Calibration under Group B Materials Site ID Location Binder / Modification Date Built Date Core Extracted FHWA ALF Virginia Control, SBS-LG 2001 2013 Manitoba Manitoba Control, Foam WMA, Evotherm WMA 2010 2014 NCAT Alabama Control, Foamed WMA 2009 2013 LTPP New Mexico, Grant County, I-10 Frontage Rd., MP 51 Asphalt Cement AC-20 1996 2006, 2014 South Dakota, Campbell County, 101st St., MP 400.1 Asphalt Cement 120-150 pen 1993 2006, 2014 Texas, Brazos County, Old Cameron Ranch Rd., MP 404.2 Asphalt Cement AC-20 1996 2007, 2014 Wisconsin, Marathon County, Apple Ln. - 1997 2005, 2014 WesTrack Fine Sections (1, 2, 3, 4, 14, 17, 18) Nevada, Dayton PG 64-22 1995 1995, 1997, 1999, 2014 WesTrack Coarse Sections (36, 39) Nevada, Dayton PG 64-22 1997 1999, 2014 a LTPP stands for Long-Term Pavement Performance. Figure 3 summarizes the geographic coverage of the selected materials/projects. The figure indicates that a broad range of geographic locations across the United States and Canada were used to develop the long-term aging procedure.

Sampl Asphalt T each sour Trials we aged in th form a un Fine As T source. T aged bind conventio inside the temperatu room tem Superpav contents FAM plu Figur e Prepar Mastic Pr he composit ce. Also, th re conducte e PAV for iform mix. phalt Matr he composit he maximum er for the F nal bucket oven until re, FAM pl perature to e gyratory p of 4.5% and g with a cor e 3. Locatio ation M eparation ion of the m e specific gr d to determi different dur Samples we ix (FAM) P ional design specific g AM sample mixer. The b it reached th ugs were co cool. The Ø lugs. The ta 8.5% were ed sample a ns of mate ethods astics was d avity of eac ne the optim ations were re taken from reparation was develo ravity, Gmm, s was pre-ag lended FAM e compactio mpacted in 20-mm × 50 rget FAM a 6.5% and 1 nd the test s 19 rials/projec etermined b h aggregate um binder c mixed with the mastic ped for FAM was calcula ed in the PA mix was p n temperatu the Superpa -mm test sp ir void cont 1%, respecti et-up, respe ts included ased on the source in th ontent for t the prepare to test in th based on ted at the ag V and then oured into a re. After re ve gyratory ecimens we ents corresp vely. Figure ctively. in the stud asphalt mix e gradation he mastics. d gradations e DSR. the mixture ing level of blended wi compactio aching the c compactor a re extracted onding to m s 4 (a) and 4 y. ture design was measur Asphalt bind and mixed design for e 0 year. The th aggregate n mold and orrect nd then left by coring th ixture air vo (b) show a for ed. ers to ach in a kept at e id

Figur  Asphal A materials of the com were subj prior to l two hour Aging of F compacte Subseque 178-mm horizonta specimen specimen thick disk F sawn bef performa self weig the comp Ø38-mm the WMA as shown e 4. (a) FAM t Mixture A ll of the asp that were u ponent ma ected to sho ong-term ag s prior to lon Compacte or all the co d in a Supe ntly, large specimens. lly cored fro s for the WM s. Then, the s. or the oven ore aging be nce test resu ht. A single acted specim × 100-mm compacted in Figure 6 plug with ging halt mixture sed in const terials were rt-term agin ing. The WM g-term agin d Specime mpacted spe rpave gyrato specimens fo To fabricate m initial gy A aging tr inner 150 m aging of the cause of the lts. Also, w aging tempe en aging tr specimens. F specimen a , to maximiz cored and s aged in th ructing the p prepared ba g at 135°C A mixture g. ns cimen aging ry compacte r aging wer small speci ratory speci ials, the spe m of the Ø large compa high proba ire mesh sup rature of 85 ials. For the igure 5 sho ging trials, e oxygen ex 20 cut sample e laboratory avements fr sed on the o for four hou s were subje trials, the s r to fabrica e prepared t mens, Ø38-m mens (Ø150 cimens were 100-mm spe cted specim bility of an a ports were °C, as speci small speci ws large and thin disk spe posure. and (b) ins were prepar om which f riginal mix rs in accord cted to shor hort-term ag te Ø150-mm hrough cori m cylindri -mm × 178 cored to ob cimens wer ens, the end ging gradie utilized to m fied by AA mens, the en small spec cimens wer trumented ed using co ield cores w design. All ance with A t-term aging ed mixture × 178-mm ng to obtain cal specime -mm). To fa tain Ø100-m e sliced to o s of the cor nt that could inimize dis SHTO R 30 ds were saw imens aging e placed on FAM samp mponent ere obtained HMA mixtu ASHTO R 3 at 117°C fo s were specimens. Ø100-mm ns were bricate the m × 178-m btain 25-mm es were not affect the tortion unde , was used fo n to obtain in the oven end in the o le. . All res 0 r × m r r . For ven,

P binder PA researche pressure wire mes distribute 7. Figure 5 F ressure agin V. The pre rs (Bell et a release. To r h hammock d over a lar . Long-term igure 6. WM g trials using ssure level o l. 1994a) ha educe the st -like suppor ger area on i aging of l A compac the compa f 300 kPa w d found that ress on the l t was develo ts sides than 21 arge and sm ted specime cted specim as selected higher pres arge specim ped to allow if it were p all specim ns aging in ens were co for the PAV sure levels d ens under s the specim ositioned ve ens in the o an oven. nducted in a aging trials amage spec elf-weight in en’s weight rtically, as ven. standard as because SH imens upon the PAV, a to be shown in Fig phalt RP ure

F Pressure T pans such the nomi mix was systemat of aging. order to o The loose were com loose mix compacta Fig T 2.1 MPa, igure 7. Sim Aging of L he oven agin that each p nal maximum agitated sev ically to min After long-t btain a unif mixture wa pacted follo was a pote bility of the ure 8. Long he pressure because pre ple set-up oose Mix g of the loo an had a rel aggregate eral times du imize any e erm aging, orm mixture s then rehea wing aging ntial concer aged loose -term aging aging trials ssure was n for holding se mix was atively thin size (NMA ring oven a ffects of an the material , and then t ted to the c for perform n, the effect mix was inv of loose m for the loose ot anticipate 22 large speci accomplishe layer of loos S) of the age ging, and th oven temper s were taken he mixture w ompaction t ance testing of increasin estigated. ix in thin la mix utilize d to induce mens durin d by separa e mix that w d mix, as sh e pans in th ature gradie out of the o as left to co emperature . Because th g the compa yers for lon d the standa any integrit g aging in t ting the mix as approxim own in Fig e oven were nt and/or dr ven and mi ol to room for 75 minu e compacta ction tempe g-term agi rd binder PA y concerns r he PAV. into severa ately equa ure 8. The lo rotated aft on the d xed together temperature tes. Specime bility of the rature on th ng in oven. V pressure egarding the l l to ose egree in . ns aged e of

23 loose mixture samples, as compaction follows the aging process. Figure 9 shows the specimen set-up. The loose mix was dispersed in thin layers, consistent with the process for oven aging. The size of the binder PAV prohibited aging a large quantity of mix efficiently, and thus, any gain in the oxidation rate had to be balanced with the amount of material that could be aged at one time or, conversely, the associated costs of developing a mixture-specific pressure aging device. Due to the capacity constraints of the PAV, the long-term aging trials of the loose mix in the PAV were limited to simply assessing how much pressure would expedite the oxidation of the loose mix. Insufficient quantities of material were aged to produce compacted specimens. Figure 9. Aging rack developed for long-term aging of loose mix in PAV. Asphalt Binder Aging Rolling Thin Film Oven Aging RTFO aging was conducted using selected original asphalt binder samples according to AASHTO T 240 to simulate short-term aging. Pressure Aging Vessel Asphalt binder residue obtained from the RTFO aging was subjected to PAV aging based on AASHTO R 28 at 100°C for 20 hours. Universal Simple Aging Test The USAT, developed by Farrar et al. (2015) at the Western Research Institute (WRI), was applied in this study to derive the oxidation kinetics of asphalt binders as part of the aging model development. In the USAT, the binder is placed in grooved plates to achieve a film thickness of 300 micrometers. The USAT plates were placed in an oven at 135°C for four hours to simulate short-term aging and best mimic the short-term aging of loose mixtures. After this binder short-term aging process, the USAT plates were placed in an oven at 95°C to simulate long-term aging.

Field Co F Referenc temperatu upper tw field core and prim core slici Figur Micro-E T performe uses a so sample si which is further ag flask was FTIR spe detectabl re Prepar ull depth cor e Library. T re-controlle o inches of e was sliced e coat layers ng pattern u e 10. Depic xtraction a he micro-ex d following lvent mixtur ze is limited adequate for ing of the b subjected t ctrometry te e solvent wa ation es were acq he acquired d room to m ach field co into 1-inch t when slicin sed. tion of field nd Recov traction and the procedu e of toluene to 200 g to both FTIR inder sampl o vacuum pr sting was c s present. uired from i field cores w inimize fur re was slice hick slices. g the field c core slices ery recovery of re proposed and ethanol produce ap spectrometr es during th essure of 80 onducted fol 24 n-service pa ere wrappe ther aging d d into 0.5-in Special atte ores. Figure used to det the asphalt by Farrar et (85:15) for proximately y testing an e extraction .0 ± 0.7 KP lowing extr vements an d with plast uring storag ch thick sec ntion was gi 10 provide ermine oxi binder from al. (2015) a extraction a 10 g of asp d DSR testin and recover a (600 ± 5 m action and r d from the M ic wrap and e. Followin tions. The r ven to avoid s a depiction dation grad the asphalt t the WRI. nd recovery halt binder p g. In order y procedure m Hg) und ecovery to e aterials placed in a g storage, th emainder of the tack co of the field ient with d mixtures w This proced . The mixtu er extractio to prevent , a distillatio er nitrogen g nsure that n e the at epth. as ure re n, n as. o

25 Test Methods Asphalt Binders FTIR Test Procedure ATR FTIR spectroscopy collects absorbance data within a wide spectral range (400 cm- 1 to 4000 cm-1). The ATR spectra were collected using 64 scans at a resolution of 4 cm-1 using a minimum of two replicates. For each binder, all replicates under different conditions were normalized to the same absorbance value at wave number 1375 cm-1. This wave number was selected for normalization because absorbance at this wave number is not affected by the level of oxidation. Changes in the C+S peaks were tracked at wave numbers 1702 cm-1 and 1032 cm-1, respectively. Additionally, C+S areas were measured as the areas under the FTIR absorbance curves at wave number ranges 1650-1820 cm-1 and 1000-1050 cm-1, respectively. The trapezoidal rule was used to numerically determine the area under the band between the specified ranges of wave number. DSR Test Procedure Frequency sweep testing was conducted at frequencies ranging from 0.1 Hz to 30 Hz and multiple temperatures (5°C, 20°C, 35°C, 50°C, and/or 64°C) using asphalt binders in the DSR with 8-mm parallel plate geometry. A strain amplitude of 1 percent was applied at all frequencies and temperatures of testing. The rheological properties analyzed included the dynamic shear modulus (G*) at 64°C and 10 rad/s, the crossover modulus (G*c) (Ferrar et al. 2013, defined as the G* value that corresponds to the reduced frequency where the storage modulus (G’) and loss modulus (G”) master curves cross (i.e., where the phase angle equals 45°)), the zero shear viscosity (ZSV), defined as the viscosity when the shear rate approaches zero (Binard et al. 2004, Brio et al. 2009), and the Glover-Rowe (G-R) parameter (Rowe et al. 2014), which has been proposed as an indicator of ductility and is equal to G*cos2δ/sinδ evaluated at 15°C and 0.005 rad/s. Asphalt Mixtures Dynamic Modulus Test Procedure Frequency sweep tests were conducted at multiple temperatures in accordance with AASHTO PP 342 to build dynamic modulus master curves. The initial test temperatures used to build these master curves were -10°C, 5°C, 20°C, 40°C, and 54°C. However, the dynamic modulus test results from the first set of specimens revealed insufficient overlap between the dynamic modulus values at the different test temperatures for highly aged materials. This lack of overlap in the dynamic modulus values precluded an accurate application of time-temperature superposition in order to construct the master curves. Therefore, to enable the successful construction of dynamic modulus master curves, most of the long-term aged mixture dynamic modulus tests were conducted at -10°C, 5°C, 15°C, 27°C, 40°C, and 54°C. At least two test replicates were conducted for each mixture and condition evaluated.

26 AMPT Cyclic Fatigue Test Procedure Cyclic fatigue testing was conducted in accordance with AASHTO TP 107. The test temperature was determined using either the binder PG or designated regional PG estimated from the LTTPBind program as per AASHTO TP 107. The testing frequency was 10 Hz. Three tests were conducted for each mixture at three different actuator displacement amplitudes (low, medium, and high).

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TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program has released a pre-publication, non-edited Report 871: Long-Term Aging of Asphalt Mixtures for Performance Testing and Prediction. The report presents a proposed standard method for long-term laboratory aging of asphalt mixtures for performance testing. The method is intended for consideration as a replacement for the method in AASHTO R 30, “Mixture Conditioning of Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA),” which was the most commonly used method for aging asphalt materials for performance testing for input to prediction models for the past 25 years. The method improves on R 30 in that the laboratory aging time is specifically determined by the climate at the project location.

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