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Interim Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research (2018)

Chapter: Appendix C Agendas from Committee Meetings

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Agendas from Committee Meetings." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Interim Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24971.
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C

Agendas from Committee Meetings

MEETING 1: JUNE 5-6, 2017

Keck Center of the National Academies
Washington, D.C

June 5, 2017

CLOSED SESSION

8:00 a.m. Breakfast
9:00 Discussion
12:00 p.m. Lunch
1:00 Discussion

OPEN SESSION

1:45 Reconvene
2:00 Perspective from DOE Fusion Energy Sciences, Ed Synakowski, DOE FES
3:00 Break
3:15 Perspectives from Capitol Hill, Adam Rosenberg and Emily Domenech, House Science, Space, and Technology
4:00 Perspectives from the U.S. Burning Plasma Organization, Chuck Greenfield, General Atomics, and Amanda Hubbard, MIT
5:00 Open public comments
5:30 Break

CLOSED SESSION

6:30 Committee dinner
8:30 Adjourn for the day

June 6, 2017

CLOSED SESSION

This day is held entirely in closed session.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Agendas from Committee Meetings." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Interim Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24971.
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MEETING 2: AUGUST 29-31, 2017

Beckman Center of the National Academies
Irvine, California

August 29, 2017

CLOSED SESSION

8:00 a.m. Breakfast
9:00 Committee discussion

OPEN SESSION

9:30 Perspectives from the U.S. ITER Project, Ned Sauthoff, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Perspectives from the ITER Organization, Bernard Bigot, Director General
10:30 Break
11:00 Perspective on Fusion Energy Strategy, Stewart Prager, Princeton University
12:00 p.m. Lunch
1:00 Perspective on Fusion Energy Strategy, Tony Taylor, General Atomics
2:00 Perspectives from University Fusion Associates, David Maurer, Auburn University
3:00 Break
3:30 Perspectives from the Virtual Laboratory for Technology, Phil Ferguson, Oak Ridge National Lab
4:30 Public comments

CLOSED SESSION

5:00 Discussion

OPEN SESSION

6:30 Dinner
8:30 Adjourn for the day

August 30, 2017

CLOSED SESSION

8:30 a.m. Committee discussion
6:00 p.m. Adjourn for the day

August 31, 2017

CLOSED SESSION

8:30 a.m. Committee discussion
2:00 p.m. Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Agendas from Committee Meetings." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Interim Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24971.
×
Page 44
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Agendas from Committee Meetings." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Interim Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24971.
×
Page 45
Next: Appendix D Previous Studies of Magnetic Fusion Energy and Strategies for Fusion Energy Development Consulted by the Committee, 1984-2017 »
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In January 2003, President George W. Bush announced that the United States would begin negotiations to join the ITER project and noted that “if successful, ITER would create the first fusion device capable of producing thermal energy comparable to the output of a power plant, making commercially viable fusion power available as soon as 2050.” The United States and the other ITER members are now constructing ITER with the aim to demonstrate that magnetically confined plasmas can produce more fusion power than the power needed to sustain the plasma. This is a critical step towards producing and delivering electricity from fusion energy.

Since the international establishment of the ITER project, ITER’s construction schedule has slipped and ITER’s costs have increased significantly, leading to questions about whether the United States should continue its commitment to participate in ITER. This study will advise how to best advance the fusion energy sciences in the United States given developments in the field, the specific international investments in fusion science and technology, and the priorities for the next ten years developed by the community and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) that were recently reported to Congress. It will address the scientific justification and needs for strengthening the foundations for realizing fusion energy given a potential choice of U.S. participation or not in the ITER project, and develops future scenarios in either case.

This interim report assesses the current status of U.S. fusion research and of the importance of burning plasma research to the development of fusion energy as well as to plasma science and other science and engineering disciplines. The final report will present strategies that incorporate continued progress toward a burning plasma experiment and a focus on innovation.

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