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Interim Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research (2018)

Chapter: Appendix D Previous Studies of Magnetic Fusion Energy and Strategies for Fusion Energy Development Consulted by the Committee, 1984-2017

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Previous Studies of Magnetic Fusion Energy and Strategies for Fusion Energy Development Consulted by the Committee, 1984-2017." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Interim Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24971.
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D

Previous Studies of Magnetic Fusion Energy and Strategies for Fusion Energy Development Consulted by the Committee, 1984-2017

NRC (National Research Council). 1984. Cooperation and Competition on the Path to Fusion Energy: A Report. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.

DOE (U.S. Department of Energy). 1985. Magnetic Fusion Program Plan. DOE/ER-0214. Washington, D.C. February.

DOE Energy Research Advisory Board. 1986. Report of the Technical Panel on Magnetic Fusion. Washington, D.C. November.

NRC. 1989. Pacing the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Program. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.

DOE FEAC (Fusion Energy Advisory Committee). 1990. Final Report. Washington, D.C. September.

DOE FEAC. 1992. Report on Program Strategy for U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research. DOE\ER-0572T. Washington, D.C. September.

PCAST (President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology). 1995. The U.S. Program of Fusion Research and Development. Washington, D.C. July 11.

DOE FEAC. 1996. A Restructured Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Washington, D.C., January 27.

DOE FESAC (Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee). 1997. Review of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Detailed Design Report. Washington, D.C. April 18.

DOE FESAC. 1998. Recommendations on the Nature and Level of U.S. Participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Extension of the Engineering Design Activities. DOE/ER-0720. Washington, D.C. January.

DOE FESAC. 1999. Opportunities in the Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Washington, D.C. June.

PCAST. 1999. Powerful Partnerships: The Federal Role in International Cooperation on Energy Innovation. Washington, D.C. June.

DOE SEAB (Secretary of Energy Advisory Board). 1999. Realizing the Promise of Fusion Energy: Final Report of the Task Force on Fusion Energy. Washington, D.C. August 9.

DOE SEAB. 1999. Report of the FESAC Panel on Priorities and Balance. Washington, D.C. September 13.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Previous Studies of Magnetic Fusion Energy and Strategies for Fusion Energy Development Consulted by the Committee, 1984-2017." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Interim Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24971.
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DOE FESAC. 2000. Report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity for the DOE Fusion Energy Sciences Program. DOE/SC-0028. Washington, D.C. September.

NRC. 2001. An Assessment of the Department of Energy’s Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Program. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.

DOE FESAC. 2001. Review of the Fusion Theory and Computing Program. Washington, D.C. August.

DOE FESAC. 2001. Review of Burning Plasma Physics. DOE/SC-0041. Washington, D.C. September.

Bangerter, R., G. Navratil, and N. Sauthoff. 2003. 2002 Fusion Summer Study Report. Report from the 2002 Fusion Summer Study, Snowmass, Colorado, July 8-19, 2002. June.

DOE FESAC. 2002. Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Burning Plasma Strategy Panel: A Burning Plasma Program Strategy to Advance Fusion Energy. Washington, D.C. September.

DOE FESAC. 2003. Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Fusion Development Path Panel: A Plan for the Development of Fusion Energy. Washington, D.C. March.

NRC. 2004. Burning Plasma: Bringing a Star to Earth. The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C.

DOE FESAC. 2005. Scientific Challenges, Opportunities and Priorities for the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Washington, D.C. April.

U.S. Burning Plasma Organization, Planning for the U.S. Fusion Community Participation in the ITER Program, June 7, 2006. https://www.burningplasma.org/web/ReNeW/EPAct_final_June09.pdf.

DOE FESAC. 2007. Priorities, Gaps and Opportunities: Towards a Long-Range Strategic Plan for Magnetic Fusion Energy. Washington, D.C. October.

NRC. 2007. Plasma Science: Advancing Knowledge in the National Interest. The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C.

NRC. 2009. A Review of the DOE Plan for U.S. Fusion Community Participation in the ITER Program. The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C.

DOE. 2009. Scientific Grand Challenges: Fusion Energy Science and the Role of Computing at the Extreme Scale. Report from the DOE Workshop held March 18-20, 2009. Washington, D.C.

DOE. 2009. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report from the DOE Workshop held June 8-12, 2009. Washington, D.C.

PCAST. 2010. Report to the President on Accelerating the Pace of Change in Energy Technologies Through an Integrated Federal Energy Policy. Washington, D.C. November.

DOE FESAC. 2012. Materials Science and Technology Research Opportunities Now and in the ITER Era: A Focused Vision on Compelling Fusion Nuclear Science Challenges. Washington, D.C. February.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Previous Studies of Magnetic Fusion Energy and Strategies for Fusion Energy Development Consulted by the Committee, 1984-2017." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Interim Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24971.
×

DOE FESAC. 2012. Opportunities for and Modes of International Collaboration in Fusion Energy Sciences Research during the ITER Era. Washington, D.C. February.

European Fusion Development Agreement. 2012. Fusion Electricity: A Roadmap to the Realization of Fusion Energy. November.

DOE FESAC. 2013. Report of the FESAC Subcommittee on the Priorities of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Science Program. Washington, D.C. February 10.

DOE FESAC. 2013. Report of the FESAC Subcommittee on the Prioritization of Proposed Scientific User Facilities for the Office of Science. Washington, D.C. March 21.

DOE FESAC. 2014. Report on Strategic Planning: Priorities Assessment and Budget Scenarios. Washington, D.C. December.

DOE. 2015. On Plasma Materials Interactions: Report on Scientific Challenges and Research Opportunities in Plasma Materials Interactions. Report from the DOE Workshop held May 4-7, 2015. Washington, D.C.

DOE. 2015. Integrated Simulations for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report from the DOE Workshop held June 2-4, 2015. Washington, D.C.

DOE. 2015. On Transients in Tokamak Plasmas: Report on Scientific Challenges and Research Opportunities in Transient Research. Report from the DOE Workshop held June 8-11, 2015. Washington, D.C.

DOE. 2015. The Office of Science’s Fusion Energy Sciences Program: A Ten-Year Perspective. Report to Congress. Washington, D.C. December.

DOE. 2016. U.S. Participation in the ITER Project. Report to Congress. Washington, D.C. May.

DOE. 2017. Project Execution Plan for U.S. ITER Subproject-1. DOE Project No. 14-SC-60. Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences, Washington, D.C. January.

Wan, Y., et al. 2017. Overview of the present progress and activities on the CFETR. Nucl. Fusion 57:102009.

Federici, G., et al. 2017. European DEMO design strategy and consequences for materials. Nucl. Fusion 57:092002.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Previous Studies of Magnetic Fusion Energy and Strategies for Fusion Energy Development Consulted by the Committee, 1984-2017." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Interim Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24971.
×
Page 46
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Previous Studies of Magnetic Fusion Energy and Strategies for Fusion Energy Development Consulted by the Committee, 1984-2017." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Interim Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24971.
×
Page 47
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Previous Studies of Magnetic Fusion Energy and Strategies for Fusion Energy Development Consulted by the Committee, 1984-2017." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Interim Report of the Committee on a Strategic Plan for U.S. Burning Plasma Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24971.
×
Page 48
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In January 2003, President George W. Bush announced that the United States would begin negotiations to join the ITER project and noted that “if successful, ITER would create the first fusion device capable of producing thermal energy comparable to the output of a power plant, making commercially viable fusion power available as soon as 2050.” The United States and the other ITER members are now constructing ITER with the aim to demonstrate that magnetically confined plasmas can produce more fusion power than the power needed to sustain the plasma. This is a critical step towards producing and delivering electricity from fusion energy.

Since the international establishment of the ITER project, ITER’s construction schedule has slipped and ITER’s costs have increased significantly, leading to questions about whether the United States should continue its commitment to participate in ITER. This study will advise how to best advance the fusion energy sciences in the United States given developments in the field, the specific international investments in fusion science and technology, and the priorities for the next ten years developed by the community and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) that were recently reported to Congress. It will address the scientific justification and needs for strengthening the foundations for realizing fusion energy given a potential choice of U.S. participation or not in the ITER project, and develops future scenarios in either case.

This interim report assesses the current status of U.S. fusion research and of the importance of burning plasma research to the development of fusion energy as well as to plasma science and other science and engineering disciplines. The final report will present strategies that incorporate continued progress toward a burning plasma experiment and a focus on innovation.

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