National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Maryland Transit Administration (MTA)
Page 343
Suggested Citation:"Massachusetts Bay Transportation Agency (MBTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 343
Page 344
Suggested Citation:"Massachusetts Bay Transportation Agency (MBTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 344
Page 345
Suggested Citation:"Massachusetts Bay Transportation Agency (MBTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 345
Page 346
Suggested Citation:"Massachusetts Bay Transportation Agency (MBTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 346
Page 347
Suggested Citation:"Massachusetts Bay Transportation Agency (MBTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 347
Page 348
Suggested Citation:"Massachusetts Bay Transportation Agency (MBTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 348

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

B‐47  Massachusetts Bay Transportation Agency (MBTA)  Case Study:  Boston, MA  Highlights: The Boston Metropolitan region is vulnerable to extreme winter weather and other coastal  hazards.  In coordination with the Governor and the state Secretary of Transportation, MBTA has  developed a comprehensive Winter Resiliency Plan, which will be implemented over the next five years  through capital investments, non‐federal MBTA capital funds, and operating funds. The plan calls for the  purchase of new snow removal equipment, infrastructure upgrades, and operations during harsh  weather to improve service reliability. The plan can be a model for other agencies that experience  extreme winter weather events.  Winter Resilience Plan  Infrastructure  Third rail replacements and heater upgrades on vulnerable outdoor sections of the Red and Orange  Lines.   Snow fence installation along the Red and Orange Lines to mitigate snowdrift accumulation.  Repairs to vehicle maintenance facilities and structures to further maximize recovery efforts.  Emergency power generators to supplement existing subway and facility power as needed.  Track access improvements for larger snow removal and track work equipment on the Red Line. Equipment   New and rehabilitated specialized snow removal equipment to increase removal capacity and reduce use of passenger vehicles.  For passenger vehicles, vehicle‐borne anti‐icing equipment, modifications to air and propulsion system resiliency and an increased stock of traction motors to improve availability. Operations   Additional snow removal contract services, as needed, to remove snow and ice at stations, facilities and other critical operations areas.  Training and staffing of a Field Inspection Team to be deployed during weather events to monitor staff and contractor field activities clearing snow and returning tracks to an operational status.  Adoption of incident management software in coordination with the MassDOT Highway Division to track deployment of snow removal operations across the system.  Formal establishment of an as‐needed inmate snow removal assistance program with the Department of Corrections to augment and streamline the services provided this winter.  Further coordination of interagency planning with the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency, state agencies and local municipalities to identify efficiencies and synergies in snow removal.

B‐48   Similar resiliency enhancements to the commuter rail network.  Revisions to the MBTA’s severe winter weather operations protocols and customer notification practices to ensure more information, customer safety and the protection of equipment and facilities. Key Resiliency Drivers:   State and local legislation;  Leadership;  Disaster Events. Key Successes   Implementation of the Winter Resilience Plan into the Capital Investments Program (CIP) in 2015   Coordination between the state, city, and MBTA  In May 2012, the MBTA signed the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) Sustainability Commitment Pledge. Commits to instituting procedures, policies, and programs designed to quantify their level of continuous improvements in the areas of water, energy, and fuel consumption, reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, increased recycling, and decreased waste generation, as well as other areas within their organization  Incorporation of reducing environmental vulnerability into the capital investments program Key Lessons Learned   Resilience initiatives are based on reactionary situations.  Experiencing a lack of funding, which has put climate change and resilience (unless reactionary) initiatives on the back burner within the CIP. Agency Details  Geographic Location  Mid‐Atlantic and Northeast  Modes Operated  HR, CR, MB, CR, LR, DR, Other  Vehicles Operated (all modes)(2011)  2,338  Annual Unlinked Trips (2013)  395.3 million unlinked trips  Typical Hazards  High Winds, Flooding, Sea Level Rise, Coastal Storm  Surge, Severe Winter Weather, High Heat Days  Background:  The MBTA was established on August 3, 1964. The "T", as it immediately came to be  known, was one of the first combined regional transportation planning and operating agencies to be  established in the United States, encompassing Boston and 77 cities and towns (1).  

B‐49  Policy and Administration  In 2009, MBTA operations were absorbed by the Massachusetts Department of Transportation  (MassDot). The MassDOT Board is composed of 11 members appointed by the Governor and oversees  all MassDOT operations. The MassDOT Board was expanded to 11 members by the Legislature this year  based upon a recommendation by Governor Baker’s Special Panel, composed of transportation leaders  that was assembled to review structural problems with the MBTA and deliver recommendations for  improvements (2).   A five‐member Fiscal and Management Control Board (FMCB) was appointed by Governor Baker this  year. The Board will enforce new oversight and management support, and increase accountability over a  3‐5 year time frame. The goals will target governance, finance, agency structure and operations through  recommended executive and legislative actions that embrace transparency and develop stability in  order to earn public trust. By statute, the MBTA FMCB will consist of five members, one with experience  in transportation finance, one with experience in mass transit operations and three members of the  MassDOT Board (2).  The state has a major influence on decision making within MBTA, especially when setting priorities. The  agency has completed resiliency‐related projects and plans but uses the definition loosely depending on  the situation. An example of the state influencing the MBTA can be found in the 2015 Winter Resilience  Plan, where the Governor made long‐term improvements to the system a high priority. A special panel  appointed by the Governor reviewed and made recommendations to fix the MBTA’s structural, financial  and operational problems. Also in 2014, MassDot created an MBTA Sustainability Report focusing on  sustainability issues such as energy, water, air, recycling and waste, and the community. The goal is to  address these items to reduce greenhouse gases and become resilient in the face of climate change.  However, due to funding constraints and higher needs within the capital investment program, priorities  have shifted.   Overall, funding seems to be a major hurdle to getting things done. The Winter Resilience Plan is the  number one priority right now. Matrices have been created to track resiliency measures that MBTA has  taken to bounce back from a disaster. Also, day‐to‐day reports on performance of system, in‐time  performance and on‐time have been implemented as well.   MBTA uses several different communications techniques to inform the public, policy makers, and  customers about steps being taken to make transit infrastructure and service more resilient, including  board of directors’ meetings that are open to the public, the media, exchange with policy makers and  ridership, and social media (tracking problems). As far as communication with other public agencies  and/or local governments regarding weather, MBTA will partner with them in returning service to  normal.   In planning for resiliency (not specifically called resiliency), the agency excels in coordination between  operations engineering and maintenance service and structure. After a disaster, MBTA ensures that  support systems are up and running and available so trains and buses show up on time.  A drill and  exercise program is in place in case of a disaster. There is interaction with emergency response teams 

B‐50  around the area (fire departments, etc.), where they conduct drills and provides access to right‐of‐way.  The agency also has a state‐of‐the‐art Emergency Training Center, which is a unique asset of MBTA.  Systems Planning  Unfortunately, MBTA does not consider changing weather conditions such as climate change within  planning activities related to system preservation of transportation networks and infrastructure.  However, MBTA has completed a vulnerability analysis to determine which assets are at risk of being  impacted by extreme weather and natural disasters. They do this by hiring a general engineering  consulting firm issued to engineering and maintenance. Their operations include flooding and storm‐ related hardening of the system. For example, based on a major flood that impacted the Green Line in  1996, MBTA and the engineering firm worked with the city of Boston to protect subway portals. Studies  were conducted to look at elevations system wide, and steps were taken with various locations to  prepare for a 100‐year flood.   In 2013, a risk analysis was completed to identify critical infrastructure.  The focus of the analysis was  on four transit lines including heavy rail and light rail and portal systems to support buses, known as the  Silver Line. A number of locations within each transit line tend to be vulnerable, depending on the level  of event and structures at risk. MBTA is in the process of mapping its assets and infrastructure in terms  of vulnerability to natural disasters and extreme weather‐related events.   Asset Management  In 2013, the MBTA established an asset management plan. Transit asset management is considered the  cornerstone on which the MBTA intends to improve system safety and reliability, reduce costs, make  better investment decisions, and provide improved service to its customers (3). However, it does not  require specific resiliency goals or policies.   MBTA is in the process of completing an infrastructure inventory through its State of Good Repair (SGR)  program database. However, it is seven months behind due to funding constraints within the agency.  The database includes revenue vehicles, non‐revenue vehicles, track/right‐of‐way, signals,  communications, power, fare equipment, stations, elevators and escalators, parking, facilities, bridges,  tunnels, and technology. The MBTA Budget Department uses the SGR Database to provide an SGR rating  for capital funding requests as well as to establish funding programs for generalized asset categories.  The SGR rating is on a 1‐5 scale, with 5 representing a new asset, 1 representing a non‐functional asset,  and 2.5 representing the score at which an asset falls below a state of good repair. The database  assesses asset condition, performance and life expectancy. The type of data that the inventory  estimates is the SGR Backlog and SGR Rating for each asset category. In addition, the report will analyze  three scenarios: how much SGR investment would be needed to eliminate the SGR Backlog over 25  years; how much SGR investment would be needed to maintain the SGR Backlog at its current level in 25  years; and how the planned investment in this and future CIPs affects the projected SGR Backlog (4).   MBTA’s asset management data systems are able to capture disruption‐related data; however, due to  funding constraints, it has not yet been used. Once operational, it will be done by using remote  monitoring of equipment. For example, it will contain a linear track system (support system to the EAM)  and takes track geometry and runs an algorithm, looking at potential changes in the pattern. MBTA has 

B‐51  also enlisted front‐line operations and maintenance staff to assist with the monitoring of infrastructure  condition and environmental and weather‐related conditions. This is part of regular day‐to‐day activity  conducted by MBTA.   Capital Planning, Programming and Finance  MBTA does have a capital investment program (CIP), and it is updated annually. For the 2016 fiscal year,  the Capital Investment Program provides the authorization to reinvest in its transportation  infrastructure and to build expansion projects. Various departments in the Authority, with strategic  oversight from senior managers, have responsibility for the day‐to‐day functions of the capital program.  The larger principles guiding the programming of funds are based on the MBTA’s enabling legislation  and the Authority’s State of Good Repair standards (MBTA, 2014). Though the term ‘resiliency’ is not  used, environmental impacts and vulnerabilities are considered when implementing projects.   A vetting process is used to determine the process used to identify new capital projects. All divisions  system wide have a listing of capital investment needs. An application must first be produced, the  vetting process is initiated, and a public hearing is scheduled. (Public input has some influence in  determining priorities). Given the Authority’s vast array of infrastructure and the need for prudent  expansion, the number of capital needs identified each year usually exceeds the MBTA’s capacity to  provide capital funds. Therefore, the Authority engages in an annual prioritization and selection process  to select the highest priority needs for funding and inclusion in the CIP (3).   For new projects, MBTA uses a time horizon of five years and conducts a cost‐benefit analysis.  Depending on what asset the agency is looking at through the application process, a description relative  to the need for resilience may be associated with that particular asset. A software tool used by the  capital budget group weighs long‐term benefits versus short‐term costs. However, the cost‐benefit  analysis does not deal with uncertainty in the context of vulnerabilities to changing climate conditions.  MBTA only adopts resilient‐type projects when there is a critical need, such as the $83 million Winter  Resilience Plan.   Project Development, Infrastructure Design and Construction  The MBTA reevaluates, develops, and regularly updates infrastructure design standards to address  changing requirements and needs and has included design standards that are focused on flooding issues  and rely on industry standards, relative to system upgrades governed by local, state and federal codes to  balance short‐term cost versus long‐term durability. However, they do not require the use of resilient  materials for rehabilitation, reconstruction, or new construction projects.   When considering the location of new facilities and equipment, MBTA does consider potential risks such  as extreme weather and flooding. Through risk analysis, MBTA has identified infrastructure that is  potentially susceptible to future flooding events, however, due to funding constraints, nothing has been  implemented to date.    Emergency Preparedness  MBTA has an emergency management plan that addresses all hazards. The plan is coordinated with  emergency response plans at the state and local levels. Updates to the plan are circulated and 

B‐52  developed in collaboration with different departments where regular meetings from stakeholders across  organizations discuss emergency management preparedness. However, MBTA does not have a  Continuity of Operations Plan and has only certain contingency plans in place when a disaster strikes.  Also, MBTA does not have a disaster recovery plan. Depending on the assets that need to be addressed,  they mobilize the necessary trades (i.e., engineering) to get service restored.   MBTA has experienced two major weather‐related disasters that required significant response: the 1996  floods and the 2015 snowfall. In 1996, the Green Line flooded from the Fenway subway portal to  Arlington St.  Four hundred million gallons of water were pumped out of the line in four days. Service  disruption lasted for nearly a week. In 2015, 100 inches of snow was accumulated and there were  freezing temperatures over a 30‐day period. Service disruption lasted for nearly 60 days.   For both weather‐related disasters, an emergency plan was in place. The plan was useful to an extent,  but many lessons were learned. In 1996, the flood pointed out shortcomings with regard to signal  system and track components. As a result, preventative and corrective maintenance considerations have  advanced. In 2015, needs arose for updated equipment to fight snow and removal; for an updated snow  management plan; for more streamlined coordination of snow activity; for better interdepartmental  communication; procurement of MBTA’s own snow‐fighting equipment to lessen dependencies on  outside help; and for replacement of right‐of‐way infrastructure.  References  1. Massachusetts Bay Transportation Agency (MBTA). About MBTA. History: The Regional System and the MBTA. Boston, MA. Available at  http://www.mbta.com/about_the_mbta/history/default.asp?id=968.   2. MBTA. 2016. About MBTA. MBTA Leadership. Boston, MA. Available at http://mbta.com/about_the_mbta/leadership/.   3. MBTA. 2014. Transit Asset Management Plan. Boston, MA. February 2014. 4. MBTA. 2016. Capital Investment Program. Boston, MA.

Next: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) »
Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Web Only Document 70: Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies includes appendicies that outline the literature reviewed and 17 case studies that explore how transit agencies absorb the impacts of disaster, recover quickly, and return rapidly to providing the services that customers rely on to meet their travel needs. The report is accompanied by Volume 1: A Guide, Volume 2: Research Overview, and a database called resilienttransit.org to help practitioners search for and identify tools to help plan for natural disasters.

This website is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

TRB hosted a webinar that discusses the research on March 12, 2018. A recording is available.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!