National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA)
Page 359
Suggested Citation:"Nashville Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 359
Page 360
Suggested Citation:"Nashville Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 360
Page 361
Suggested Citation:"Nashville Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 361
Page 362
Suggested Citation:"Nashville Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 362
Page 363
Suggested Citation:"Nashville Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 363

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

B‐63  Nashville Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA)  Case Study:  Nashville, TN  Highlights: Nashville MTA’s interest in resilience stems from flooding that impacted the agency’s assets  and services in 2010.  In addition, the City’s Mayor has expressed a public commitment to expanding  transit services.  In this context, most of the agency’s efforts have been on emergency preparedness and  rapid recovery of services when disrupted by extreme weather or natural disaster.  Nashville MTA is  focused on making sure it “can keep services on the street.”  Part of achieving this goal has included  taking steps to ensure bus storage facilities and administrative offices were moved out of flood prone  areas.  Key Resiliency Drivers   New leadership in the agency in Chief Operating Officer, arrived in summer 2015, and city leadership in mayor’s office  Citywide emphasis on collaborative emergency planning  Local partnerships with agencies, such as public schools and Housing, whose populations are regularly affected by urgency and emergency in their circumstances  2010 anomaly flooding of the Cumberland River, which destroyed approximately a third of the bus fleet, forced boat evacuation of staff from MTA hub facility, interrupted transit service for two weeks, required rebuilding the hub facility, and spurred previously unprecedented preparation and training for flooding events Key Successes   Consideration of flooding in alternate route planning, siting, operator and staff training  Increased collaborative planning with regular and new department/agency partners in the city  Renovation of existing facility and staff move to additional new facility on higher ground  Capital planning with more preparedness focus (e.g., scissor lifts in future purchasing)  More readiness in overall planning: “We are looking to reinvent ourselves in terms of emergency responses”  Development of MOU with water department location on higher ground 2.5 miles from MTA hub to move buses there when high water is forecast Key Lessons Learned   Importance of training for staff and operators toward emergencies that have not happened before  Coordination with city departments and other agencies for emergency response and recovery  Increased potential for flooding due to changing weather patterns

B‐64  Agency Details  Geographic Location  Southeast  Modes Operated  Metro bus, commuter bus, and paratransit  System Size  Small  Typical Hazards  Summer storms/lightning, tornadoes; winter storms/icy hills,  occasional snow; high winds; potential but rare riverine  flooding  Background:  The Nashville‐Davidson, Tennessee metropolitan area has one independent transit agency,  the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA), which provides service to the city of Nashville and purchased  services to the Middle Tennessee Regional Transportation Authority.  MTA operates more than 50  routes for 9.8 million riders on an operating budget of approximately $60.5millon. MTA functions as a  Nashville municipal department, with 54 percent of its annual budget derived from the metropolitan  government, a combined county‐city entity in Nashville.   A newly‐elected mayor and her appointed Director of Finance have stated ambitious goals for increasing  transit in Nashville, so the agency is in the process of several efforts not used in the past, including long‐ range capital planning and stepped‐up emergency management planning, which will likely contribute to  resilience and sustainability.  These are not terms the agency currently uses for planning – they are more  likely to use “preparedness”—but the forecasting work they describe will clearly contribute to future  resiliency.  Policy and Administration  The Nashville‐Davidson Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) provides services to Tennessee’s capital  city, the second largest city in the state. City‐county (the government structure) population was 644,014  in 2013, about the size of Boston.  The 13‐county metro area population was 1,757,912. The city is a  center for the music, healthcare, publishing, banking and transportation industries, and is home to  numerous colleges and universities. In 2015, Business Facilities' 11th Annual Rankings report named  Nashville the number one city for Economic Growth Potential. Economic and population growth is  attributed to revised zoning and investment in parks has stimulated real estate development, especially  out of state capital investment, toward creating walkable urban neighborhoods mixing retail, residential,  commercial and entertainment.   The Nashville‐Davidson metropolitan area (combined city and country governmental entity) is one of the  fastest growing cities in the country: an average of 82 people move there every day, contributing to an  annual growth percentage of 12.7 percent between 2000‐20131 Resulting traffic woes have increased  attention to transit, but Tennessee has no income tax and municipalities depend on sales tax for  revenue. The new mayor called out a focus on transit in her 2015 inaugural address, promising to seek  federal and state funding for transit projects.  Currently, MTA receives 17 percent of its funding from  1 http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/10/nashville‐charlotte‐public‐transit/412741/ 

B‐65  federal sources, and six percent from state. MTA is revising its capital planning from annual to longer  term, with fuller budget planning expected for 2017.   The MTA provides bus transit within the city, out of a newly built hub station downtown. Approximately  55 routes utilize a hub and spoke method. Expansion plans include use of bus rapid transit for new  routes, with the possibility for local rail service at some point in the future. Currently service includes  using RTA for Relax and Ride commuter service during a.m. and p.m. rush, under contract with Gray Line  to provide buses and operators.  Active Ride, MTA’s paratransit services, uses contracted overflow taxi  service to provide added capacity beyond what MTA can handle.   The agency does not conduct formal asset management planning and anticipates that future capital  spending guidance will be issued from the mayor’s office of budget and finance.  MTA’s COO expects  that priorities will be “More balancing to be sure that projects that were approved are completed and  that right amount of funding was given and that in any shared projects both [collaborating agencies with  MTA] agencies are successful.”  The area has a moderate climate, with few enough winter storms that city resources for plowing and  salting are scarce.  An eight‐inch snow in 2015 effectively shut down the city for three days, although  some bus routes operated. Occasional winter storm conditions of ice and some snow make transit  hazardous because of hilly terrain; black ice is a problem as often as three or four times a year. Summer  weather produces some high winds that affect buses and occasionally cause delays, from operators’  pulling to the side of the road to wait out gusts. Little street flooding occurs and has not been a transit  issue (with the exception of the 2010 flooding).  Tornadoes are seasonal and MTA has emergency  procedures in place for these events.   A thousand‐year flooding event of the Cumberland River in 2010 brought nearly 50 inches of water into  the MTA primary facility and caused complete flooding of bus parking areas, two weeks’ service  interruption, and substantial damage to primary office/hub/maintenance facility. The MTA’s hub facility,  where most of its vehicles and staff were at the time, was surrounded because the Cumberland River is  on one side of the property and two streamways on another side.   The historic event was unexpected and no protocols were in place to respond.  When it was clear that  the river was overtopping, operators began moving buses to higher ground, but had to give up when  water reached the engines.  Some staff evacuated by vehicle while they could; others stayed into the  night to direct emergency response, as much as possible, but then were evacuated by fire and rescue  personnel in boats. The building was severely damaged, and a third of the fleet lost.   The flood triggered more awareness of preparedness, but funding prevented some measures.  The hub  building was remodeled, not torn down and rebuilt, so some resiliency changes that could have been  made in a new building were not.  MTA has developed an MOU with the Water Services Department to  use the parking lot of their facility 2.5 miles from the bus hub as a place where buses can be moved if  flooding threatens.  Most of MTA’s efforts toward resiliency appear to be in collaborative work with other departments and  agencies.  Interdepartmental cooperation has been required by the metro government’s budgeting  approach in the past, but collaborative work has been increased since the flood, especially in shared 

B‐66  emergency planning.  This collaborative effort means that administration of the MTA has a shared  aspect in some areas that may be unusual for other transit agencies.  For example, MTA’s requirements  for engagement in the city’s crisis management plan (CMP) dictate some decisions about operations,  funding allocation, and staffing.  Measurement and Reporting on Resilience‐Related Efforts  Because MTA doesn’t specify resilience‐related efforts, there is no measurement or reporting as such.   There is tracking of increased training for emergencies.   Because of the shocking impact of the 2010 flood on Nashville, communication with the public, policy  makers, customers or others about emergency preparedness has been considerable.  The agency uses  press releases and its web site to get information about conditions out to the public, but also relies on  its partner agencies (e.g., police, schools, housing) to reach the public. These agencies share awareness  that changing weather circumstances mean increased likelihood that a damaging flood could occur  again.  Rains in 2015 brought some flooding to the area, but not as a significant emergency.  Systems Planning and Asset Management  MTA has not mapped its assets and infrastructure in terms of vulnerability to natural disasters and  weather‐related events. As capital planning for the agency becomes more sophisticated, other layers of  planning, such as asset planning, may be added.   MTA plans for back up routes during disruptions from flooding.  Agreements with collaborating agencies  are directed toward borrowing assets (e.g., parking space from Water Services) and services (e.g.,  distribution of bus passes for homeless in acute cold conditions) from sister agencies.  The agency plans  to evaluate what resiliency goals may be achievable and what makes sense (time for return to service) in  the next year.  Capital Planning, Programming and Finance  MTA’s capital planning is performed annually to meet the requirements of the city office of budget and  finance. For the first time, in 2016, MTA will begin long‐term (five‐to‐ten year) capital planning. The  focus of capital planning is assuring funding requests that can be justified by actual expenditures, with  planned outcomes.  When projected outcomes are shared – such as MTA’s youth programming that  provides student bus service, coordinated with schools, after‐school programs, police/crime prevention  – budgets, including capital expenditures, are coordinated and each agency held responsible for its portion of the funding.   MTA’s life‐cycle planning is built into its bus replacement planning.  For a typical bus, the average life is  12 years, and MTA tries to get four or five buses every year, through joint purchasing agreements with  other transit agencies in Tennessee. In the past there was no real assessment of buildings, but since the 2010 flood, MTA has moved  administrative staff to a new facility (on higher ground) and is considering how to manage the  maintenance work still done in the flood plain facility. The agency’s first priority is its vehicles and  keeping service on the streets (unless there is a security or safety issue).  

B‐67  Operations and Maintenance  MTA is working on plans/standard operating procedures to temporarily harden infrastructure (e.g.,  deploy sandbags and other flood proofing), which it had never considered before 2010, and to protect  assets (relocate vehicles and other moveable equipment) when extreme weather and/or a natural  disaster are anticipated.  Emergency Preparedness  MTA has emergency management and procedures, which are part of its coordinated CMP with other  agencies and the city’s overall emergency planning.  Communication is central to their approach; in  threatening weather, customer care people come in earlier, and the agency uses email, phone calls, and  verbal alerts at transfer points.  They alert third party operators and news media. The area’s office of  emergency management (OEM) is close to downtown and MTA provides a safety or security manager  overnight to keep track of weather, when necessary. MTA has participated in tabletop exercises to train  personnel regarding the protocols and procedures included in the area’s management preparation.  Current Collaborations  MTA is part of many collaborative efforts for provision of services, and for regional emergency  management planning.  The agency’s resiliency efforts seems to be shaped in important ways by these  collaborations with other metropolitan agencies (fire, police, emergency management, housing) that  involve cooperative funding, with each agency responsible for providing budget forecasts, executing  planned/budgeted activities, and demonstrating how activities corresponded to requested funds (“how  spending matches asking plan”) in cooperation with other agencies sharing the funding.  For example,  MTA collaborates with the local housing authority for emergency transportation/shelter for the area’s  homeless population when the temperature is 32 degrees or below.  Bus passes distributed through the  housing authority to various agencies are made available to people who will need transportation to  shelters.  Both MTA and the housing authority must defend to the city finance officer the amount and  use of their collaborative funding.  Various youth services provide another example, including the STRIDE program that provides bus passes  to get students to and from schools.  Not only providing the bus services, MTA also works with crime  units, police, and schools to monitor how after‐school programs are utilized, as well as on‐time  performance for students with passes.  While it is beyond the scope of this study to examine an agency’s contribution to overall community  resilience, it is worth noting the substantial commitment and achievement MTA makes to resilience in  Nashville, in just the two programs named above. 

Next: New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT »
Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Web Only Document 70: Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies includes appendicies that outline the literature reviewed and 17 case studies that explore how transit agencies absorb the impacts of disaster, recover quickly, and return rapidly to providing the services that customers rely on to meet their travel needs. The report is accompanied by Volume 1: A Guide, Volume 2: Research Overview, and a database called resilienttransit.org to help practitioners search for and identify tools to help plan for natural disasters.

This website is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

TRB hosted a webinar that discusses the research on March 12, 2018. A recording is available.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!