National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT
Page 372
Suggested Citation:"New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (NORTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 372
Page 373
Suggested Citation:"New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (NORTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 373
Page 374
Suggested Citation:"New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (NORTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 374
Page 375
Suggested Citation:"New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (NORTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 375
Page 376
Suggested Citation:"New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (NORTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 376
Page 377
Suggested Citation:"New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (NORTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 377
Page 378
Suggested Citation:"New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (NORTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 378
Page 379
Suggested Citation:"New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (NORTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 379

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

B‐76  New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (NORTA)  Case Study:  Serving Orleans Parish and Kenner, Louisiana  Highlights:  Over the past 10 years, the RTA has been aggressively rebuilding its entire system (facilities,  vehicles, equipment, track, catenary, electrical substations), which was largely destroyed Hurricane  Katrina in 2005.  A “philosophy of resilience is woven into all their investment and operational  decisions.”  RTA has put in place procedures to relocate all moveable assets out of “harm’s way” to  remote and safe locations when flooding is expected. Key functions for the system’s operation can be  provided “on the fly.” The RTA has a mobile dispatch and communication unit that is now a key player in  New Orleans’ City‐Assisted Evacuation Plan, which is designed to serve the large carless population in  New Orleans. The plan was successfully executed in response to Hurricane Gustav in 2008   Key Resiliency Drivers   Leaders at all levels of government  Infusion of critical funding by the Federal Government (FEMA, USDOT, FHWA, Corps of Engineers)  Leadership by the RTA Board of Commissioners and their private management/operational team of Transdev, which oversees the day‐to‐day functions of the transit authority  Implementing policies that assure there will be no repeat of the death and destruction caused by Hurricane Katrina  Strong partnership with the City of New Orleans, the Deputy Mayor for the City’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness, the Regional Planning Commission (MPO) as well as leaders in the region. Key Successes   “In a mere 32 days, the RTA resumed operations, using its surviving vehicles and a group of 83 buses donated from cities across the country. The RTA’s resilient employees began to cobble together the remains of New Orleans’ 179 year‐old transit system” (1).  Over the past decade, the RTA has rebuilt their system almost completely while instituting an operative philosophy of resilience woven into all their investment and operational decisions.  While Katrina showed the dysfunction of the City’s and RTA’s evacuation plans, in the ensuing years great strides have been taken to right the wrongs of Katrina‐era evacuation policies and procedures: no “shelter of last resort” within the city; no vertical evacuation; no “safe harbors” within the city.  Strong partnerships with a wide array of federal and state partners as well as the Regional Planning Commission (the New Orleans MPO).  An aggressive streetcar line expansion program is being constructed along North Rampart Street along the upper French Quarter.

B‐77  Key Lessons Learned   Resiliency is a management and operational mandate post‐Katrina.  The unthinkable can happen. Be prepared for the worst.  Tenacity can persevere over incredible obstacles; it just takes incredible focused vision and the financial resources.  Anything is possible.  Aggressive marketing and system expansions have resulted in significant gains in annual ridership: “Last 5 years – ridership up (7.0 million) 60% and service hours up (146,000) 32%. In 2013 – ridership up (2.0 million) 12% and service hours up (75,000) 14%” (2).  “The RTA in New Orleans has undergone an amazing renaissance and has overcome enormous challenges in the ten years since Hurricane Katrina – challenges never faced by any transit system in American history. Through this process the RTA has emerged as a renewed organization“ (3). Agency Details  Geographic Location  Gulf Coast  Modes Operated  Bus, paratransit, historic streetcars, pedestrian ferry  Vehicles Operated [all  modes](2013)  135  Annual Unlinked Trips (2013)  12,9155,657  Typical Hazards  Hurricanes, urban flooding, coastal flooding, waves, storm  surge,   Background: The RTA began operating as the public transit provider in 1983 for the Greater New  Orleans region, however, today, it provides service to only Orleans parish and the suburban city of  Kenner. Its Board of Commissioners is appointed by both the Mayor of New Orleans and the President  of Jefferson Parish. At its peak its annual ridership was over 18.6 million riders making it the largest  transit authority in Louisiana. In 2004, the RTA reported 367 buses, 66 streetcars, and 115 demand  response vehicles to the National Transit Database.  The RTA is governed by a Board of Commissioners but day‐to‐day management and operations are  contracted to Transdev, formerly Veolia, who were awarded a 5 year contract in 2009 with a 5 year  extension. This is a unique operating model for a public transit authority in the United States. The RTA  Board has the overall authority for transit in New Orleans including setting fares, overseeing service and  operations, developing operating budgets, approving each year’s annual transportation development  plan, and deciding upon capital purchases and expansions.  Background of Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans:  When Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans on  August 29, 2005 the massive flooding caused by the storm surge and resultant failures of the federal  protection system (flood walls, levees and pump stations) covered over 80% of the city with water, in  some places, over 15 feet in depth. As a result, the city was largely abandoned and those who could not  leave were taken to a “shelter of last resort”: the Louisiana Superdome. Others sought shelter at the 

B‐78  Ernest N. Morial New Orleans Convention Center. Their plight was broadcast across the country for  countless days as the death and destruction in New Orleans became clearer.   The RTA used buses to transport people to the Louisiana Superdome, the city’s designated “shelter of  last refuge.” Flooding occurred at all of RTA’s facilities except the Willow Street streetcar barn. Damages  included:  85% of its fleet was destroyed or rendered useless and inoperative; 146 buses were visible  outdoors (and under water) at the RTA’s 2817 Canal Street facility, while only 22 were at 3900 Desire  Parkway. The flooded buses were basically written off.   Katrina was the costliest natural disaster in US history (estimated at $108 billion by the National Oceanic  and Atmospheric Administration). It killed over 1,833 people along the Gulf Coast and impacted almost  all of New Orleans’ neighborhoods.   Katrina and the RTA: “There was no precedent for how to reconstruct a transit system after the kind of  devastation that resulted from Hurricane Katrina. More than half of the RTA’s vehicles were destroyed  and others severely damaged. Its maintenance and operational facilities, as well as administrative  offices in New Orleans East were destroyed. Employees were left devastated by the loss of their homes  and way of life…These everyday people…banded together under unprecedented circumstances and  extreme challenges, with limited funds, and rebuilt a major transportation system from scratch. The  story of how they responded in the aftermath of Katrina is one of reliance, ingenuity, dedication and  grit” (1).  The First Few Months after Katrina Struck: In testimony before a subcommittee of the US House of  Representatives in October 2005, (post‐Katrina) RTA General Manager William J. Deville reported “that  as a result of Katrina, the RTA lost 30 streetcars, 197 buses, and an undetermined number of LIFT /  paratransit vehicles. Administrative offices in New Orleans East, the A. Phillip Randolph Bus Facility on  Canal Street, the Canal Streetcar Storage, Inspection and Service Facility and the East New Orleans were  all extensively damaged by high winds and floodwaters” (4). The ridership base for the RTA was  devastated.   To understand the extent of the RTA’s infrastructure damage and its impact on ridership, I attended all  sessions of the Bring New Orleans Back (BNOB) Infrastructure Committee, the Mayoral appointed  recovery body, chaired by then RTA‐Chairman James Reese. I wondered about the fate of the RTA. Mr.  Reese stated in multiple meetings “As far as public transit is concerned, I have no idea. Are the people  coming back? To where? How many? At this time, all of these remain unknown” (5).  No one had  answers to these questions in the waning months of 2005. But the citizens of New Orleans did return,  neighborhoods were rebuilt and public transit began a long, painful period of recovery and renewal.   Pre‐Katrina, daily ridership averaged 124,000 on the system’s 46 bus routes and 3 streetcar lines or an  annual ridership of 45,260,000. According to a local transit advocacy group, Ride New Orleans, whose  2015 publication The State of Transit in New Orleans, 2015: Ten Years After Katrina: “Today, 10 years  (after Katrina) bus service is down 65% while there are now more streetcars making more trips than  were offered in 2005. Ridership gains have slowed in recent years, likely due to the lack of frequent  service. While streetcars remain an historic and iconic part of our transit system, they are costly to  install and inflexible in providing service. Federal monies and local bond sales have financed a massive 

B‐79  streetcar expansion project which has not been well‐integrated into the existing network of bus routes  and has worsened commutes for some bus riders by forcing them to transfer to the new streetcar to  complete their trip.” (6)  Policy and Administration  Relative to RTA’s post‐Katrina efforts, they “sought as many external sources of revenue as possible,  securing over $320 million in federal funding. Countless hours were expended to provide the exhaustive  detail necessary to complete the extensive paperwork and submit proposals to secure each funding  source. Examples of the secured funds include:   A $45 million grant from the TIGER stimulus program  $17.3 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act federal stimulus program  $7 million to replace the cross‐ties on the St. Charles streetcar line  Forgiveness of a $47 million community disaster loan  $130 million in FEMA funds to restore facilities, streetcar electrical wires and track infrastructure and to purchase new bus, streetcar and paratransit vehicles The above actions, plus the ongoing rigorous management of finances, budgets, and costs have  improved the RTA’s credit rating and its financial stability. With careful management, the RTA has  recovered financially from the many challenges presented by Hurricane Katrina” (1).  “In 2008, with about 30% of the transit system restored, the RTA recognized that more transit service  was needed to get the people of New Orleans to and from jobs, retail, universities, healthcare, and  other locations…(Consequently) The RTA Board of Commissioners, through a competitive solicitation  process, requested proposals from private‐sector companies with expertise in transit operations and  management. The RTA selected Veolia Transportation, now Transdev, to serve as its transit operator  under a five year agreement with a five year extension…Under an agreement signed in the fall of 2009,  Transdev manages and operates all aspects of the transit agency with supervision from the RTA. The  Board maintains policy control, including service levels and fares, as well as ownership of all assets,  vehicles, and facilities. This arrangement is common in Europe and Asia, but was the first‐of‐its‐kind in  the U.S…The RTA Board directed Transdev to build upon what the RTA had already accomplished since  2006. After an extensive analysis, bus routes were redesigned in 2010 to serve as many people as  possible, address the greatest needs, and match new settlement and travel patterns in the city with the  equipment the RTA had at the time…Since 2008, as operations became more normalized and the focus  on efficiency paid off, RTA costs per revenue hour have decreased significantly every year…Total RTA  cost per revenue hour is approaching pre‐Katrina levels, an accomplishment of which the RTA Board and  Transdev are deservedly proud….The combination of decreased costs plus significant growth in ridership  means the RTA is providing more trips for less cost per trip” (1).  With the infusion of federal monies and bond revenues, the RTA has steadily rebuilt their facilities and  service fleet. However, since Katrina, the operative philosophy at RTA is resilience and recovery. Toward  those ends, fixed route services have returned to most neighborhoods. During the repopulation period, 

B‐80  Lil Easy demand response vehicles provided service to neighborhoods “slowly repopulating” including  Gentilly, Lakeview and the Lower Ninth Ward.  Tools:   Used a variety of federal, state and city funds for disaster recovery and reconstruction as well as bond monies  Operative policy of resiliency adopted post‐Katrina for all reconstruction and new capital projects Successes:   Substantially rebuilt system and facilities after Katrina  Active participation in the CAEP which was used successfully during Hurricane Gustav Lessons Learned:   Previous policies and procedures applied during Hurricane Katrina were abandoned.  New policies and procedures were adopted that changed the foundations of disaster evacuation in New Orleans. Systems Planning  All policies and procedures adopted by the RTA have resiliency at their core. This includes the  reconstruction of facilities, vehicle rebuilds, support infrastructure, maintenance programs, etc. Key  support utilities (generators, substations, etc.) have been elevated to avoid future flood damage.  Remote safe houses for moveable equipment (buses and paratransit vehicles) have a pre‐arranged  “safe” destination “out of region”.  A mobile control and dispatch unit has been purchased which  accommodates eight key personnel for management of equipment during disasters.  Tools:    Core policy in all planning, operational and management decision making is resiliency  Closely coordinate their system with the Deputy Mayor for Homeland Security and Disaster Preparedness and his core staff as well as state and federal partners Lessons Learned:   Plan for the worst but prey for the best because the worst can and did happen during Hurricane Katrina  Proactively plan and manage for a resilient system: physical facilities, vehicle fleet, critical infrastructure  Safe locations for vehicle storage “out of region” have been secured for future hurricane events  The CAEP works. This was shown by the successful evacuation during Hurricane Gustav. Details are described below.

B‐81  Post‐Katrina Evacuation Policies Rethought: The City‐Assisted Evacuation Plan   The City’s evacuation plan for hurricane events include some significant changes from their pre‐Katrina  policies: no vertical evacuations are allowed; no “shelter of last resort” is used in disaster evacuations;  proactive partnership with the RTA to pick‐up carless evacuees by public transit at 17 designated pick‐up  points throughout the city; uses the New Orleans Union Passenger Station (used by Amtrak, Greyhound  and Mega‐Bus) as a staging area for evacuation out of the city to “safe havens” at state or federal  shelters.   The City’s Office of Homeland Protection and Emergency Preparedness in association with Evacuteer, a  local not‐for‐profit (dedicated to the safe evacuation of the city’s carless population both residents and  tourists), and the RTA have joined with other affected agencies in the region to form a standing  committee on emergency preparedness and evacuation. An interesting outgrowth of this partnership  was a recent project coordinated with the Arts Council of New Orleans.  Funded by the city’s Percent for  Art program, identifiers (large symbolic structures) were installed at the designated evacuee pick‐up  spots for carless evacuees. They have also prepared graphic materials as part of the City Assisted  Evacuation Plan (CAEP) and have a procedure in case of an approaching hurricane. The RTA is an active  participant in the CAEP and has a “seat at the table”.   The RTA, with federal assistance, purchased a Backup Mobile Command Center, which is on ready‐alert  with onboard systems including satellite communications, GPS tracking, dispatch and control capabilities  for its eight person crew. Equipment safe havens have been secured at the Baton Rouge Airport for “out  of region” relocation of equipment storage. All RTA facilities have been flood proofed as much as  feasible. A remote operating facility is on hand in case of a future disaster. A comprehensive fleet /  equipment replacement and upgrade program continues. Finally, the New Orleans Union Passenger  Terminal is now being converted to a multimodal transportation that includes Greyhound, Amtrak and  RTA services (the newly built Loyola Avenue Streetcar connecting to Canal Street).  Capital Planning, Programming and Finance  Post‐Katrina the RTA was tasked to restore their pre‐Katrina system (all modes, all flooded facilities,  critical infrastructure) as quickly and effectively as possible. This required the RTA to pursue all available  sources of finance, including their own bond indebtedness, to rebuild their entire system. They were  fortunate to obtain a $45M (100% federal) TIGER grant for the Loyola Streetcar extension, $17.3M from  the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act stimulus program, forgiveness for a $47M community  disaster loan, and $130M in FEMA funds to restore facilities, catenary and track for the streetcar lines,  and to purchase new bus, streetcar, and paratransit vehicles.  Project Development, Infrastructure Design, and Construction  Summary: In terms of new project development, infrastructure design, and construction the emphasis  post‐Katrina has been system restoration as well as new streetcar line development. The rationale for  new streetcar lines is described below. 

B‐82  A New Emphasis on Streetcar Line Expansions  Special mention must be made for the streetcar vehicle replacement and expansion program. According  to RTA “Of what was left of (our) infrastructure in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the streetcars  were in the best position to be quickly repaired and restored to service. Streetcar line reconstruction  was made possible by federal funds, which by law could only be used to restore streetcar track,  electrical systems, and the red (Riverfront line) streetcars. Thanks to these funds, streetcar lines now  feature new infrastructure including underground cabling, track beds, catenary poles, electrification and  substations. Streetcars were essential to mobility during the recovery years…Today, the streetcar  system continues to provide over 7.3 million passenger trips for local residents and tourists each year,  and it connects with all but two of the RTA’s bus lines. The agency is in the process of expanding  streetcar service to additional areas and continues to connect streetcars to bus routes for travel  crosstown, downtown, and to key commercial centers. The first phase of streetcar expansion was Loyola  Avenue, which opened in 2013. The second phase will be Rampart to Elysian Fields which began  construction in January 2015” (1).  Tools:   Special federal funds (TIGER grant and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) were secured by the RTA to implement projects that had been on the drawing boards for over 15 years. With these funds, the RTA ventured into unknown territory: the Loyola Avenue Streetcar line (finished in 2012) and the North Rampart Streetcar Line (currently under construction). These projects have served as economic development stimuli for a number of projects along their route: the South Market District mixed use neighborhood adjacent to the Loyola Streetcar line ($400M) as well as the Pythian mixed use project under construction and a new hotel project along Rampart Street, the first new lodging facility under taken in decades along the North Rampart corridor. Operations and Maintenance  Summary: From an operations and maintenance perspective, RTA has been actively pursuing reliance‐ oriented thinking and activities for the past decade: i.e. post‐Katrina. They have had no choice. Their  survival was dependent on this core philosophy. It was imperative to make this the core for all activities  of the RTA.  Post‐Katrina Growth and Development  Looking back over the past decade, the transformation of New Orleans as a city and the RTA as a public  transit provider is nothing short of remarkable. We now have over 600 more restaurants than pre‐ Katrina, our schools are now a national example for the charter school movement, and the RTA is back  with expanding streetcar service serving the upper Vieux Carre’ along North Rampart Street and is  planning for its extension down St. Claude Avenue. This project has been on the table for consideration  by the affected neighborhoods for over 15 years. The RTA is now making historic strides with an  operative goal of resiliency in policy, procedures, operations, and construction.  

B‐83  References  1. RTA Board and Transdev Executive Staff, “Rebuilding for Tomorrow: Our Progress and Vision for the Future”, August 2015.  2. RTA Board Training Workshop: Service  Improvements Proposal by  Justine Augustine and Stephan Marks. July 19, 2014.  3. Salvador  G.  Longoria,  Chairman  RTA  “Regional  Transit  Authority  |  Report  to  the  Community, Rebuilding for Tomorrow, Our Progress and Vision for the Future” August 2015.   4. Amdal,James and Swigart, Stan, “Resilient Transportation Systems in a Post‐Disaster Environment: A Case Study of Opportunities Realized and Missed in the Greater New Orleans Region”, October 2010.  5. Reese, James “Bring New Orleans Back (BNOB) Infrastructure Meetings” November, 2005 – January 2006.  6. Ride New Orleans, “The State of Transit in New Orleans Ten Years After Katrina”, 2015.

Next: San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART »
Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Web Only Document 70: Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies includes appendicies that outline the literature reviewed and 17 case studies that explore how transit agencies absorb the impacts of disaster, recover quickly, and return rapidly to providing the services that customers rely on to meet their travel needs. The report is accompanied by Volume 1: A Guide, Volume 2: Research Overview, and a database called resilienttransit.org to help practitioners search for and identify tools to help plan for natural disasters.

This website is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

TRB hosted a webinar that discusses the research on March 12, 2018. A recording is available.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!