National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (NORTA)
Page 380
Suggested Citation:"San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 380
Page 381
Suggested Citation:"San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 381
Page 382
Suggested Citation:"San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 382
Page 383
Suggested Citation:"San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 383
Page 384
Suggested Citation:"San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 384
Page 385
Suggested Citation:"San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 385
Page 386
Suggested Citation:"San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 386
Page 387
Suggested Citation:"San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 387

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

B‐84  San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART)  Case Study:  San Francisco, CA  Highlights:  BART’s resilience efforts date back several decades to the Northridge Earthquake (1994).   More recently the agency has begun to broaden its focus to include resilience to extreme weather and  climate change. Research over the past several years–including as part of the FTA Climate Change  Adaptation pilot program–regarding vulnerability of BART assets and infrastructure to natural hazards  and sea level rise provided a basis for obtaining the support of senior management at the agency to  pursue strategies aimed at extreme weather resilience in addition to earthquake safety.  The agencies  20 years of experience retrofitting existing and building new infrastructure to withstand seismic threats  is providing a strong foundation for its climate adaptation efforts and consideration of weather‐related  resilience in its policies, planning, capital programming, project design and construction activities.  BART  is also an active participant in regional planning efforts aimed at addressing the threat of sea level rise in  the San Francisco Bay Area.   Key Resiliency Drivers   State and local emphasis on resiliency;  FTA Pilot Study’s identification of vulnerabilities;  Extreme weather events; and  Local, regional and state resiliency activities. Key Successes  Earthquake Safety Program   Obtaining public support to seek approval of bond issuance to pay for earthquake safety upgrades.  Implementation of a complete earthquake resiliency program including a comprehensive vulnerability assessment, development and evaluation of adaptation strategies, and full implementation of a capital improvement program to retrofit the transit system to increase resiliency against the hazard.  Establishing a process to allow for variances from seismic design criteria that does not compromise infrastructure performance during an earthquake.  Incorporation of earthquake resiliency into agency through seismic design standards. Climate Adaptation   Obtaining leadership support on current and future climate adaptation and resiliency efforts.  Effectively communicated risks to executive leadership to drive resiliency funding decisions.

B‐85  Key Lessons Learned   There is a need for a robust understanding of risk through understanding asset vulnerability to and impact from hazards to be able to incorporate policies and promote projects within an agency. Agencies will rely on the best available science provided at the local or regional level.  Regional coordination will be key in addressing sea level rise flooding issues where adaptations can occur beyond the transit agency’s property boundary.  Public outreach and education may improve public support for resiliency programs. Agency Details  Geographic Location  West Coast  Modes Operated  HR  Vehicles Operated [all modes](2013)  534  Annual Unlinked Trips (2013)  126,546,495  Hazards  Earthquake, Sea Level Rise, Flooding, High Winds, Tsunami,  Landslides, Wildfire, Drought, Heat  Background:  Established through the State Legislature in 1951, plans were developed for the original  BART system between 1957 and 1961.  After plan changes and challenges, construction began in 1964  with first rail service beginning in 1972. As part of the original system, BART completed the Transbay  Tube in 1969, which saw revenue service begin in 1974  In 1989, the San Francisco area was hit by the Loma Prieta earthquake. Major damage to BART’s  infrastructure was avoided, resulting in an influx of BART commuters.  The month following the  earthquake, BART hit new ridership records providing a critical service link during the closure of the Bay  Bridge.   With the passing of each earthquake, including those outside of the greater San Francisco Bay  Area such as the Northridge Earthquake in 1994, many changes to the seismic design and subsequent  building codes occurred.  As knowledge and technology advances, the need for continual updates to  resiliency efforts should as well.  In the 1990’s, a series of studies were conducted identifying that aerial  structures were at risk to a major earthquake.  The USGS predicted at least one more major earthquake  will hit the region in the next 30 years. It was at this point a seismic retrofit program was proposed.  In 2000, the Earthquake Safety Program was established and continues today focusing on retrofitting  the system with updated design standards to increase resiliency.  San Francisco itself has been at the  forefront of addressing climate change, specifically sea level rise.  In 2010, local, state and federal  agencies were brought together to collaborate and understand the effects of flooding along the coast in  the San Francisco Bay Area.  The program, Adapting to Rising Tides (ART) continues to provide tools and  support for resiliency planning in the region (1).  In 2011, the agency was one of eight transit systems to be funded through the FTA to conduct a climate  change adaptation pilot study.  This study allowed BART to evaluate its infrastructure against the risk  and threats to the system, develop adaptation strategies to address at risk infrastructure, and link those 

B‐86  strategies to the organizational structure and activities.  Today, BART is continuing their efforts to  address both seismic resiliency and climate change resiliency.  In a follow‐up study to the FTA Pilot Project, BART participated and supported the development of the  “Climate Change and Extreme Weather Adaptation Options for Transportation Assets in the Bay Area  Pilot Project: Technical Report (6).” Outlined within the report is guidance for conducting an assessment  of infrastructure in the Bay Area as well as guidance on mainstreaming climate change within  transportation decision making.  This guidance may support transit agencies as they fully integrated  resiliency into their organization.  Beginning in 2015, San Mateo County began the process of conducting  a vulnerability study, which BART has engaged the county on.  Policy and Administration  Climate Adaptation  The State of California along with regional stakeholders has been and continues to be proponents of  resiliency and climate change adaptation.  This state and local level emphasis on resiliency has allowed  BART and its leadership to respond in‐kind and begin to support efforts in addressing resiliency.  After  completion of the FTA Pilot Study, staff was able to effectively communicate the findings of the study to  department leads and executive management.  As a result, senior level staff recognized the importance  to expand on the original study to include additional vulnerability assessments and other work.  This  recognition led senior management and the BART Board of Directors to approve agency funding for  FY15‐16 to continue work on resiliency and adaptation.  Internal efforts are currently focused on continued assessment and work around flooding vulnerabilities  from the agency’s train control system.  The train control system will be modernized in the coming years  and the additional funding will look at best adaptation strategies to protect the capital investment.   Additionally, BART is directing efforts to incorporate climate change impacts, and more specifically sea  level rise, into the update of the Local Hazard Mitigation Plan (LHMP) (1) [Note: The 2016 draft plan is  available (2)].  Related, BART is also working to solidify its sustainability program.  Further highlighting the agency’s  leadership in support of future resiliency work, the sustainability program will be built with input and  direction from top leadership.  Although a specific policy has not been adopted by BART on resiliency  and/or climate change adaptation, it is fully anticipated that this will become one area of focus for the  sustainability program.  Externally, the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC) has adopted  policies that require sea level rise risk assessments to be completed when planning within shoreline  areas.  Projects must be designed to cope with expected sea level rise impacts for the lifetime of the  design. (3) BCDC provides guidance to increase resilience to sea level rise and storm events through a  collaborative project with Bay Area communities called “Adapting to Rising Tides” that may assist transit  agencies. (4) In addition to these local and regional actions that can impact an agency’s effort to  improve resiliency, state and federal agencies can drive efforts and policy. At the state level, California  has worked to develop a statewide climate adaptation plan. This includes CalTrans, the State 

B‐87  Department of Transportation.  As part of this state effort CalTrans has developed guidance for  Incorporating Sea Level Rise into future projects and planning. (5)  Earthquake Safety Program  BART is recognized as a leader in earthquake resiliency.  Following the 1989 earthquake, extensive  studies were conducted highlighting the seismic risk BART was susceptible to.  As a result, BART  established the Earthquake Safety Program (ESP) in 2000. The program is expected to end when  infrastructure upgrades are completed in 2022. The program may serve as a model for other transit  agencies, which seek to implement a retrofitting program to address a particular type of hazard.  BART’s  program recognized that it is neither practical nor cost effective to protect everything against every  hazard, so choices were made about the level of retrofit to be pursued.  It should be noted that each  hazard is unique therefore the adaptation approach can differ.   BART’s earthquake retrofit program  primarily focuses on the agency’s infrastructure whereas a program to address flooding may require  more regional coordination.  For example, the Port of Oakland’s constructed levees and implemented  pump stations resulting in protection for both Port of Oakland as well as BART assets.   Tools:   Adapting to Rising Tides (ART) (4) Description: The ART Program is focused on incorporating adaptation into local and regional planning in the San Francisco Bay Area. There are a number of tools and guidance, which may be tailored to agencies outside of the region for incorporating adaptation into projects.  Guidance and tools from the website includes but not limited to: o Stakeholder and Public Engagement o Selecting Scenarios o Vulnerability Assessments and Analysis o Identification of Key Planning Issues o Developing Adaptation Response o Adaptation Response Evaluation  Climate Change and Extreme Weather Adaptation Options for Transportation Assets in the Bay Area Pilot Project: Technical Report  (6) Description:  The technical report provides extensive guidance that may be adapted to another agency to work through a process of collecting data, assessing vulnerability, and the development and selection of adaptation strategies.  It also outlines guidance for incorporating climate change into a transportation agency. Successes:   Obtaining leadership support to back current and future climate adaptation and resiliency efforts.  Effectively communicated risks to executive leadership to drive future resiliency funding decisions.

B‐88  Lessons Learned:   Regional coordination will be key in addressing sea level rise flooding issues where adaptations can occur beyond the transit agency’s property boundary.  There is a need for a robust understanding of risk through understanding asset vulnerability to and impact from hazards to be able to incorporate policies and promote projects within an agency. Agencies will rely on the best available science provided at the local or regional level.  The LHMP process broadly solidified BART’s understanding natural hazards and helps to inform emergency preparedness planning. Capital Planning, Programming and Finance  Earthquake Safety Program  Although partially supported by BART, the ESP is now funded through a number of sources which  leadership actively sought to enhance the transit systems resiliency.  Funding is currently provided by  the following sources:   $125 million from California Department of Transportation Local Seismic Safety Retrofit Program  $93 million from Regional Measure 2 (RM2), State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), Prop 1B  $11.5 million from Transportation Congestion Relief Program (TCRP)  $3 million from FEMA Pre‐Disaster Mitigation Program  $60 million from other Funds In addition, BART sought public approval for issuance of general obligation bonds in the amount of $980  million.  Although the measure failed to pass during the first attempt, BART conducted extensive  outreach to local interest groups and other public agencies.  This included a number of educational  presentations to citizens.  During a second vote, voters approved Regional Measure AA, authorizing  BART to issue the bonds. The measure also requires BART to establish a Citizen Oversight Committee to  ensure the money is spent as promised.  Successes:   Obtaining public support to seek approval of bond issuance to pay for earthquake resiliency retrofit upgrades. Lessons Learned:   Public outreach and education may improve public support for resiliency programs. Project Development, Infrastructure Design and Construction  Earthquake Safety Program  As part of the ESP, the first step was an extensive vulnerability assessment of BART’s entire  infrastructure prior to recommending a retrofit program.  The approach used by BART is considered 

B‐89  state‐of‐the‐art for seismic evaluations.  With input from the California Seismic Safety Commission and a  BART Peer Review Panel, the assessment consisted of:   Defining levels of performance, including service disruptions from an earthquake;  Scenario development and the evaluation of system vulnerability to those earthquake scenarios to include considerations of costs associated with system repair, and impacts to both commuting and non‐commuting populations; and  Developing and evaluating a series of retrofit/resiliency packages. (7) An outline of this process, which is adaptable to other agencies, is available online at the Northern  California Chapter of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. (7) The website also references  other potential resources to support an agency in their development of a retrofit program.  A copy of  the vulnerability study conducted by BART may be requested directly from the agency (8).  Once this assessment was completed, the Board approved the most cost‐effective package.  The  program outlined retrofits for a “core” portion of the system that meets operational standards.  Other  areas of the system received upgrades to address safety.  As part of this assessment, the ESP identified  not only the aerial structures also identified in the 1990’s studies as vulnerable but issues with the  Transbay Tube, stations and equipment.  Projects were prioritized and included demolition of the Lake  Merritt Administration building. Other major seismic retrofits included six parking structures.  The efforts to retrofit facilities considered two design events. For the safety upgrades, BART used what  they called the ‘Design Basis Earthquake’, which is defined as the greater of the probabilistic 500‐year  return period event, or deterministic median plus ½ standard deviation.  For most faults in the Bay Area,  this is not the same as the Maximum Credible Earthquake (MCE).  For operability retrofits, there is the  Lower Design Basis Earthquake or LDBE, which is the deterministic median.  (For the Transbay Tube,  both of these criteria are higher than for the rest of the system due to the Tube’s criticality for system  operation and safety.)  Infrastructure was evaluated on a site‐specific basis and BART believes the new  design standards are robust for a retrofitting program.  Due to the many unknowns at the start of the ESP, BART established a variance process to allow  designers to request relief from established seismic design criteria when it could be shown that  earthquake performance was not affected and money could be saved.  The process was extensively  employed.  Various government bodies have established seismic design procedures, some of which are  incorporated into national and local codes.  BART only employed code approaches for secondary  structures such as parking garages, shop buildings, etc.  As the program progressed, the ESP activities have affected seismic design standards for new structures,  due to staff knowledge of the state‐of‐the‐art in seismic design.  ESP staff has also recommended  extensive changes to BART’s specifications and standard drawings and to BART’s earthquake emergency  response based on the programs findings. In general, BART updates its Facilities Standards periodically,  and as such has a standard procedure for commenting on the Standards.  Staff utilizes this process to  make their recommendations.  The comments are considered by stakeholder committees for  incorporation into future revisions to the standards. 

B‐90  In support of furthering earthquake resiliency BART has invested in an Earthquake Event Reaction  System:  The BART Earthquake Event Reaction System receives data from the more than 160  seismic stations of the California Integrated Seismic Network throughout Northern  California. If the messages from the seismic network indicate ground motion above a  certain threshold, the BART central computers, which supervise train performance,  institute a normal service braking to slow trains down to 26 miles per hour. An  automatic system‐wide “hold” is put in place such that no train will depart a station  without manual intervention. With the automated braking in place, BART Train  Controllers, reacting to the same alert, instruct Train Operators to maintain 26 miles per  hour or brake to a stop depending on the specific operational situation for each train.  The system software is running on a pair of redundant servers in BART’s central  computer room, connected over the internet to a pair of redundant servers at the  University of California, Berkeley Datacenter in Berkeley (9).  Climate Adaptation  BART is also considering adaptation strategies through design and construction changes.  The current  review of the train control system has highlighted some initial problems and strategies that may be  considered. These include:   Reconstructing control room roofs so they are pitched to allow water runoff;  Incorporation of drip loops along cables to reduce water impacts at conduit locations; and  Replacement of rubber gaskets at doors. One pilot project that BART successfully implemented was the construction of head houses at a single  entrance to an underground station.  The result was successful protection of the entrance elevator from  water thus reducing the number of times it is in disrepair.  Tools:   Earthquake Event Reaction System Description: Early warning earthquake system developed out of the University of California, Berkeley that pulls data from seismic monitoring locations to provide warnings of an imminent earthquake.  Warnings are just a few seconds to tens of seconds but can allow for immediate and automated responses by transit staff and systems. Successes:   Implementation of a complete earthquake resiliency program including a comprehensive vulnerability assessment, development and evaluation of adaptation strategies, and full implementation of a capital improvement program to retrofit the transit system to increase resiliency against the hazard.  Establishing a process for the allowance for variances to established agency building criteria and code, which does not compromise infrastructure performance during an earthquake.  Incorporation of earthquake resiliency into agency procedures for updating design standards.

B‐91  Participating BART Personnel (For Internal Notes Only ‐ To Be Removed Prior to Publication)   Norman Wong, Environmental Engineer  Tian Feng, District Architect  Thomas Horton, Group Manager (Earthquake Safety Program) References  1. Perkins, Jeanne B., and Danielle Hutchings. 2010. 2011 Regional Hazard Mitigiation Plan. Association of Bay Area Governments Resilience Program. [Online] 2010. [Cited: February 10, 2016.]  http://resilience.abag.ca.gov/wp‐content/documents/ThePlan‐Chapters‐Intro.pdf.  2. San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit. 2016. Locla Hazard Mitigation Plan. Bay Area Rapid Transit. [Online] San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit, February 2016. [Cited: February 10, 2016.]  http://www.bart.gov/sites/default/files/docs/Draft%20Local%20Hazard%20Mitigation%20Plan_0.pdf.  3. City and County of San Francisco Sea Level Rise Committee. 2014. Guidance for Incorporating Sea Level Rise into Capital Planning in San Francisco: Assessing Vulnerability and Risk to Support Adaptation.  ONESF. [Online] September 14, 2014. [Cited: January 27, 2016.] http://onesanfrancisco.org/wp‐ content/uploads/Agenda‐Item‐7‐Sea‐Level‐Rise‐Guidance.pdf.  4. Adapting to Rising Tides. [Online] 2016. [Cited: February 10, 2016.] http://www.adaptingtorisingtides.org/.  5. California Department of Transportation. 2011. Guidance on Incorporating Sea Level Rise: For use in the planning and devleopment of Project Initiation Documents. California Department of Transportation.  [Online] May 16, 2011. [Cited: February 10, 2016.]  http://www.dot.ca.gov/ser/downloads/sealevel/guide_incorp_slr.pdf.  6. Metropolitan Transportation Commission. 2014. Climate Change and Extreme Weather Adaptation Options for Transportation Assets in the Bay Area Pilot Project: Technical Report. Metropolitan  Transportation Commission. [Online] December 2014. [Cited: February 16, 2016.]  http://files.mtc.ca.gov/pdf/MTC_ClmteChng_ExtrmWthr_Adtpn_Report_Final.pdf.  7. Northern California Chapter of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. 2016. Seismic Retrofit Decision‐making for a Large System. Northern California Chapter of the Earthquake Engineering  Research Institute. [Online] [Cited: February 12, 2016.] http://www.eerinc.org/?page_id=242.  8. Bay Area Rapid Transit. 2016. Earthquake Safety Program Technical Information. Bay Area Rapid Transit. [Online] 2016. [Cited: February 12, 2016.] http://www.bart.gov/about/projects/eqs/technical.  9. U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources: One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, Second Session. 2014. Whole Lotta Shakin': An  Examionation of America's Earrthqauke` Early Warning System Development and Implementation.  Homeland Security Digital Library. [Online] June 10, 2014. [Cited: February 10, 2016.]  https://www.hsdl.org/?view&did=755458. 

Next: SFMTA/MUNI: San Francisco Municipal Railway »
Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Web Only Document 70: Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies includes appendicies that outline the literature reviewed and 17 case studies that explore how transit agencies absorb the impacts of disaster, recover quickly, and return rapidly to providing the services that customers rely on to meet their travel needs. The report is accompanied by Volume 1: A Guide, Volume 2: Research Overview, and a database called resilienttransit.org to help practitioners search for and identify tools to help plan for natural disasters.

This website is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

TRB hosted a webinar that discusses the research on March 12, 2018. A recording is available.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!