National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: SFMTA/MUNI: San Francisco Municipal Railway
Page 397
Suggested Citation:"Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 397
Page 398
Suggested Citation:"Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 398
Page 399
Suggested Citation:"Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 399
Page 400
Suggested Citation:"Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 400
Page 401
Suggested Citation:"Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 401
Page 402
Suggested Citation:"Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 402
Page 403
Suggested Citation:"Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 403
Page 404
Suggested Citation:"Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 404
Page 405
Suggested Citation:"Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 405
Page 406
Suggested Citation:"Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 406
Page 407
Suggested Citation:"Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 407
Page 408
Suggested Citation:"Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 408

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

B‐101  Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA)  Case Study:  Philadelphia, PA‐NJ‐DE‐MD  Highlights: Resilience and sustainability are part of SEPTA’s corporate culture, which is evident in how  the agency approaches extreme weather response, safety, project development, and overall day‐to‐day  operations.  Primary hazards include flooding, high heat, winter storms and power loss due to extreme  weather.  SEPTA is particularly focused on “event readiness” and restoration of service after weather‐ related service disruptions.  They are investing in infrastructure protection where feasible and cost  effective (flood proofing, bank stabilization, bridge scour protection), as part of maintenance and capital  project construction.  SEPTA regularly engages front‐line workers to collect data and information on  system vulnerabilities and performance and uses its asset management systems to flag preventative  maintenance needs/requirements/issues that contribute to improved resilience.   Key Resiliency Drivers   Past disaster experience.  Executive Leadership: SEPTA’s General Manager, Jeffery D.  Knueppel: Chief Engineer for 13 years with progressive responsibilities in asset management, engineering, infrastructure maintenance, and capital construction; then Deputy General Manager for 3 years with broader responsibilities also including operations; now General Manager since October of 2015.  Board Leadership: SEPTA’s Board emphasized safety, sustainability programs and customer satisfaction and communications.  MPO, DVRPC, the City of Philadelphia, state and service counties, and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, including Penn DOT: Key to providing support for strategic goal, capital funding and project priorities, strategic importance to investments, emergency communications, training and coordination. Key Successes   Board support for emergency management: through the adoption of safety, sustainability, asset management and event readiness goals, policies, measures and funding support. After safety, the key performance measure is event readiness.  Consistent support and commitment from executive management.  Continuous engagement of front‐line employees through efforts to engage shop personnel, supervisors, drivers, maintenance, engineers, etc. to articulate and define areas of success, problems and concerns with respect to weather‐related emergency operations in the SEPTA service areas.  Scalability through ensuring developing multiyear capital investments designed and planned to address problem areas in safety, sustainability and event readiness during weather emergency events.

B‐102   Building a cross‐functional team with committed executive support, recognizing that all of the SEPTA family has a stake in ensuring the safety, event readiness, vigilance of SEPTA in severe weather events.  Regional support from other partners in emergency management  Communications with timely, effective outreach and listening to customers, SEPTA employees, federal, state and local partners, press, legislature, Mayor’s and Governor’s offices, Penn DOT, unions, public emergency management offices, etc.  Building a culture to be event‐ready and sustainable, which includes training, building on and celebrating success, development of plans and policies designed to be implemented to achieve event readiness.  Building linkages between various partners in planning, funding, operations and communications to ensure each player understands their role and function and to understand how each fit together and affect others.  Additional adequate funding to finance the multiyear capital program to improve SEPTA’s ability to safely meet severe weather events. Key Lessons Learned   Use the federal environmental review process that encourages the evaluation of future disasters or climatic events as part of the analysis. Look at sustainability in those future conditions and make determinations of risk and vulnerability to address and mitigate issues.  “Fix and fortify” approach works.  It is critical to have the public’s trust when dealing with financial and emergency issues or problems, so communication is key.  Define corporate priorities and processes before shopping for software solutions for asset management or other functions.  Remember Transit Asset Management (TAM) is a tool and not the end.  Developing the program is iterative and time consuming.  Information and assistance from other transit agencies can be very helpful.  For addressing new and uncertain weather events, and considering various designs, materials and approaches to protect against or mitigate risks, shared “war stories” among public agencies as to the effectiveness and value of such materials or designs would be helpful.  Be prepared with projects if new funding were to materialize.  Be transparent and accurate when sharing large capital needs numbers, so as to not overwhelm the public decision makers and public that the number is too large to be able to get things done.  Communicate and celebrate successes that demonstrate solutions to problems/issues.  Recognize that severe weather events are part of the new operating environment.

B‐103  Agency Details  Geographic Location  Northeast  Modes Operated  Bus, heavy rail, commuter rail, streetcar, trolley bus, demand  response  System Size  Large  Typical Hazards  Heavy rain, riverine flooding, blizzards, extreme heat, high  winds, extreme cold and ice; earthquakes  The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transit Authority (SEPTA) is the sixth largest transit system in the  United States. In the mid‐Atlantic region, SEPTA serves Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and  Philadelphia Counties in Pennsylvania, with services to Newark, Delaware and Trenton, New Jersey, and  interfaces with Amtrak on the Northeast Corridor. The 2013‐2014 annual ridership was:  Bus: 184 million passenger trips  Heavy Rail: 101 million trips  Commuter Rail: 37 million trips  Street Car Rail: 27 million trips  Trolley Buses: 6 million trips  Demand Response: 1.7 million  SEPTA is a Commonwealth‐ chartered authority charged with funding and operating public  transportation in the city of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, and  Montgomery. Its organizational mission is “dedicated to delivering safe, reliable, sustainable, accessible  and customer focused public transit services, contributing to the region’s economic vitality and  enhanced quality of life.” It is governed by a 15‐member board of directors: two members appointed by  the City of Philadelphia, five from the state, eight from the suburban counties. SEPTA’s internal  management team is led by the General Manager, a dedicated director, and an interdisciplinary SEPTA  team. SEPTA is part of and works throughout the year with the state and city offices of emergency  management and the regional MPO‐ DVRPC. Given the multistate transit service, SEPTA also coordinates  with other transit systems, such as New Jersey Transit, PATCO, DART and Amtrak. 

B‐104  SEPTA as part of FTA’s “Transit Climate Change Adaptation Assessment Pilot” (2013)  SEPTA does not emphasize the term “resiliency,” but rather prefers to talk about the sub  components that lead to a resilient system, including event preparedness, response, and  recovery. The National Academy definition of resilience is broad enough to encompass their goal  of event readiness, asset management and infrastructure sustainability. SEPTA’s approach was  pragmatic. SEPTA understands the vulnerabilities of the aged infrastructure and the impacts of  decades of weather‐related service issues. For the past 12 years, the Deputy General Manager   (now the General Manager) has led agency efforts to create a practical and sustainable transit  service that meet core values and performance, based on getting service returned as quickly as  possible. These efforts include addressing capital, operating, maintenance, and administrative  strategies and investments to vulnerable, aging systems to upgrade assets and improve  resilience against future extreme weather events.  Because of the early leadership in identifying, planning and investing in weather‐related emergencies,  SEPTA already had a system and decision‐making process in place for the FTA Pilot. Consequently, SEPTA  did not need to undertake a systems wide approach and modeling, but could focus the study on their  particularly vulnerable service that fully contained all the weather‐related issues found in the other  service areas: SEPTA’s Manayunk/Norristown Regional Rail line. This route is a more than 100‐year‐old  line whose geographical location cannot be altered without extensive dislocation and a route that  experiences all the severe weather events noted above. It is a route that is one of the most challenging  to SEPTA; and addressing weather‐related ‐problems here assists SEPTA in several ways: extrapolations  of solutions or approaches to other system routes/services; minimizing weather‐related service  disruptions to their customers; and establishing resiliency measures that meet SEPTA’s major  performance objective (after safety): getting service back quickly. Recent climate‐related events that affected SEPTA 2010‐2015:   The Philadelphia region has experienced four FEMA major disaster declarations since 2010, including Philadelphia’s first and second snowiest winters ever, its wettest year ever, and its warmest year ever recorded.  Hurricane Sandy, in 2012, had severe winds that knocked out power for more than 1.3 million Pennsylvania electricity customers. The majority of those outages were focused in SEPTA’s service area of Philadelphia and its surrounding suburbs. The service region also experienced significant flooding.  Along the Manayunk/Norristown Line, 13 (62 percent) of the 21 recorded floods in Schuylkill River history have occurred since 2003.  The winter of 2013‐2014, for Philadelphia and the Leigh Valley, was the second snowiest winter recorded, with a total over 67.4 inches.  The northeast United States has experienced a 67 percent increase in heavy rain since the mid‐ 20th century. Consequences of these severe weather events 2010‐2015 included:   Stranded customers, particularly on the rail system.  Suspension or disruption of service due to flooding such as severe rain event or hurricanes, such as Sandy; blizzards or significant ice and snow storms; extreme heat; wind; and mud slides.

B‐105   Downed catenary and power lines due to high winds and ice that disrupted service, with challenging conditions for customers and employees.  Damaged infrastructure from ice jams against rail bridges, or scouring of rail bridges due to high water or flooding conditions; repair or replacement of catenary power lines due to falling trees/tree limbs, high winds, extreme heat, ice and sleet; rail switches and signals, retaining walls, SEPTA building, shelters, and equipment. Extreme heat that buckled rail tracks.  Significant costs to harden maintain and repair facilities and systems to severe weather events, such as slope retaining walls, building raised signal huts; turn back track areas outside flood zones; emergency generators, redesigned and high subway ventwells.  Improved maintenance and operations, such as aggressive tree trimming, sandbagging ventwells, staging fleet to higher ground; improved emergency tracking, enhanced customer communications. Working through the risk assessment, events, recovery and rebuilding‐focused planning.  Today  SEPTA’s key severe weather emergency goals and strategies are:   Ensuring the safety of customers and SEPTA employees during an extreme weather event;  Event readiness;  Effective and timely communications with customers and employees on what SEPTA is and will be doing during the event;  Planned service suspensions;  Informed and frequent interagency coordination;  Undertaking continuous monitoring and risk assessments;  Prioritized capital investments;  Securing sufficient financial resources to implement the capital investment program;  Putting the core system first:  for an event affecting all service areas, the approach is to start at the center of their service, which is in the City, and meet those needs first and then proceed out to other service areas. These goals and strategies anchor planning to address the weather‐related events that SEPTA  anticipates occurring through mid‐century. 

Policy and SEPTA is a investmen managem are prude For more  addressin and with t services.   “Resilienc Within th SEPTA’s a performa funding. S and positi such as a  alternativ For antici that are c  Administra ctively engag ts. The term ent and deliv nt.  than a decad g disasters an heir partners y” is an integ ose elements bility to prov nce measure  EPTA has bee oning of equ tree falling o e bus service pated storm e oordinated w tion  ed in policie  “resiliency“  ering service e, the Gener d severe we  to develop a ral part of SE  is the need t ide mobility a for SEPTA is  n successful ipment and s nto the caten  to customer vents, SEPTA ith the with  s, planning, f is part of larg s and project al Manager a ather events  culture that PTA’s strateg o address ho nd economic event readine  in bouncing  taff; and by t ary lines, by  s.   has establis emergency m B‐106  inancing and  er program e s that are eff nd executive . They have w  includes saf ic planning in w severe we  opportuniti ss. This requ back from se he ability to  providing inf hed procedu anagement  funding their fforts, such a icient, effect  staffs have b orked consis ety and even  terms of as ather events es to the regi ires organiza vere weathe quickly respo ormation to c res and proto partners. The  operations a s safety, sus ive, provide t een invested tently within t readiness fo set managem  and natural  on and state tional comm r events due  nd to unexpe ustomers an cols for susp  agency uses nd capital  tainability, as he long haul  in meeting a  the organiza r all of SEPTA ent and safe disasters affe . A key policy itment and  to preplannin cted problem d getting  ension of se  a wide varie set  , and  nd  tion  ’s  ty.  ct   and  g  s,  rvices  ty of 

B‐107  social media tools, TV announcements, public presentations, and radio shows to inform their customers  and the public. Transparency is a key element in the agency’s communication.   Systems Planning  Both asset management and the sustainability units in conjunction with operations look at system  planning to assess what is working and what needs analysis; what climate threats are affecting service  and how can they be addressed. SEPTA has considerable inherent historic and current knowledge about  service operations and how weather affects those services, and, using that knowledge, has developed  strategic investment decisions and changes to operations. For example, in rail corridors prone to  flooding and disrupted service and increasing safety concerns of wash outs or slope slides, SEPTA has  invested in turn backs before flood zones to ensure the safety of the customers, employees and  equipment. The determination of this type of investment is based on vulnerability and risk analyses,  with projects prioritized in terms of safety, probability of the event, cost impacts of service delays on the  route and the system, within a matrix of options and projected costs.  The vulnerability and risk assessment informs the asset management and sustainability planning, both  short and long term.  These plans are critical components to capital investment and programming  projects and systems decisions. Climate conditions in the near and longer term are considered by  sustainability analysis.   At this time, SEPTA has not mapped the agency’s infrastructure and services in terms of vulnerability to  natural disasters and weather‐related events or engaged in interagency mapping. Consequently SEPTA  has not engaged with other system providers on systems interdependencies. (NOTE: Vulnerability is  addressed systematically as State of Good Repair initiatives. No specific interagency projects or cost  estimates have been analyzed.)  SEPTA system vulnerabilities have and will continue to be identified and analyzed in terms of their  transit impacts and costs. These analyses have been communicated to SEPTA’s decision makers in the  form of vulnerability assessments, capital and emergency planning, and capital programming.  The  critical measure for system performance is: how fast can a service be safely restored? Event readiness  and restoration are the major performance measures for SEPTA’s system performance in weather‐ related events and disasters.   SEPTA uses buses to provide service on rail corridors that have been suspended from severe climate  events, such as heavy rains and flooding. SEPTA does not have partnerships with other agencies or  companies to provide redundant services. However, because safety is a critical path in determining  weather vulnerabilities, SEPTA makes redundant power decisions for operational facilities. Many  operational personnel are cross‐trained to meet emergency situations.  Event readiness and the measure of how fast can service be restored are important to decisions that  also balance safety, sustainability, asset management, resiliency and state of good repair (SGR). These  factors, coupled with costs, are the bases for investment decisions.  Asset Management 

B‐108  SEPTA is in the process of developing an asset management program, which will include projects that  mitigate the effects of natural disasters and severe weather events. The Transportation Asset  Management program (TAM) involves three elements:     Vehicle and infrastructure maintenance management systems with inventories, life cycle and maintenance management  A decision‐support tool  Asset management plan that includes policies on how assets are to be maintained through the assets’ life cycle The TAM has identified seven major high risk/vulnerabilities that are being addressed; a key one is  flooding.  SEPTA is building its inventory system that is based on conversations with front‐line staff and the chief  engineering officers responsible for maintenance and renewal; the inventory is structured by critical  areas.  Inventory is updated as needed. The database includes categories for critical areas, such as rail  with sub classification tracks, or signals or switches.  SEPTA’s severe weather protocol, as well as the asset management program, identifies vulnerabilities  and risks, where individual assets and systems are impacted by disasters and severe weather issues.   SEPTA does not have an Office of Resiliency; that concept is incorporated into the organization’s  strategic business processes.   Adaptation to climate is one of the several parameters that are evaluated  as part of the capital decision‐making process.  SEPTA’s capital improvement program is funded through federal and state sources.  In 2013, the  Pennsylvania State Legislature signed Act 89, which significantly increased the size of SEPTA’s capital  improvement program.  SEPTA also received an FTA grant to harden core infrastructure in 2014.  SEPTA  is now able to advance several programs to both address state of good repair needs, as well as bolster  resiliency to extreme weather events.  Examples of such projects include: soil and rock stabilization on  the Regional Rail; flood mitigation on both the Regional Rail and the trolley lines, and the construction of  an ancillary control center. SEPTA is also experimenting with technology pilots for advanced flood  warnings, with information sent to the control center, which captures disruption occurrences.  Capital Planning, Programming and Finance  Funding for SEPTA, as with all transit agencies, is limited and requires a commitment to target resources  to high priorities. SEPTA’s 12‐year capital program plans have critical projects and investments to  provide SEPTA with sustainable capabilities. Resiliency is incorporated into the sustainability assessment  and program from which projects or systems are prioritized, using APTA’s sustainability guidance.  SEPTA’s approach to weather resiliency and capital investments can be summarized by two key points:  1) Incorporate resilience thinking into project development; 2) Know your system’s criticalities and vulnerabilities and invest strategically. 

 K Figure 2. Res SEP ilience Lesso TA’s Funded  B‐109  ns for Projec Resiliency Pr t Developme ojects  nt  EY E 

B‐110  NGINING TAKEAWAYS: RESILIENCE IS THE NEW REALITY3  SEPTA’s asset management program is one of the key factors for moving a new capital project forward.   Asset management includes assessments for weather resiliency and sustainability.  SEPTA’s Capital  Planning Committee uses a variety of factors to prioritize capital investments and new projects, and  criticality is a consideration. For example, a key SEPTA goal is keep the Broad Street Line operating in  severe weather events. Investments that provide for that goal would be viewed as critical. The time  horizon for new projects is from 12 years to 50 years, with 15 years for buses.  Cost‐benefit analyses are  not used to prioritize new projects, but event readiness is.  Disasters and severe weather events, while challenging and devastating, can also provide capital funding  opportunities.  SEPTA received $86.8 million from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Emergency  Relief Program (the federal 75 percent match) for resilience projects in response to Hurricane Sandy.  SEPTA’s asset management and sustainability analyses and programs had identified projects that, if  done, would provide a safer and more sustainable transit system. The $86.8 million funded the following  projects:  Railroad Embankment and Slope Stabilization Project: $18.7 million to stabilize and harden soil and  rock slopes along a series of vulnerable 19th century railroad cuts; Sharon Hill Line Flood Mitigation  Project: $3.8 million to construct a pumped drainage system that will mitigate flooding on the Sharon  Hill Line in Delaware County; Railroad Signal Power Reinforcement Project: $32.0 million to reinforce  signal power across the Regional; Ancillary Control Center Project: $9.0 million to construct a back‐up  control center facility at a strategic location outside of Center City of Philadelphia to allow for remote  dispatching of transit service in the event of an emergency;  Subway Pump Room Emergency Power  Project: $3.7 million to install an integrated series of emergency power systems for pump rooms  throughout SEPTA’s subway tunnels across the City of Philadelphia; Jenkintown Area Flood Mitigation  Project: $15.0 million to study and implement improvements to the Hydrologic conditions at  Jenkintown, a key hub in SEPTA’s Regional Rail network in Montgomery County; Manayunk/Norristown  Line Shoreline Stabilization Project: $4.5 million to stabilize 2.45 miles of railroad right‐of‐way adjacent  to the Schuylkill River in Montgomery County. (See database attachment entitled FTA FUNDING FOR  SEPTA INFRASTRUCTURE RESILIENCE PROGRAM)  Project Development, Infrastructure Design and Construction  Within the asset management and sustainability framework, SEPTA regularly updates infrastructure  design standards and how they operate, emphasizing practical processes and learning from other  transit, transportation and environmental entities. Sharing what works is helpful. Current and forecasted  weather conditions indicate that heavy rainfalls and flooding are likely to continue and be more  frequent.  Slope retention and raising signal huts will reduce and possibly prevent service disruptions  from failed signals or track wash outs.   New projects or replacement projects are evaluated through the asset management and sustainability  programs. These programs evaluate projects on the basis of improving the life cycle of the investment 

B‐111  and its ability to resist service failure/disruptions. New materials are considered to the extent that their  use will enhance safety or the investments’ life cycle and/or limit/prevent service disruption, or is more  cost effective.   Environmental review analyses consider sustainability, which includes severe weather events and  disasters. This includes the location of new facilities and equipment as an element of assessment.  SEPTA explores opportunities when repairing or replacing existing infrastructure to consider making the  investment more sustainable. Knowing where risks and vulnerabilities are provides SEPTA with critical  information on the consequences for safety and service disruptions caused by severe weather events;  this in turn helps make the investment decision on whether to mitigate the problem or not. Examples of  action are the slope stabilization and raising the signal huts to resolve operational and safety problems.  Plans are to continue to elevate infrastructure above future flood levels where beneficial and where  SEPTA deems it is prudent. In cases where rail tracks cannot be elevated, SEPTA investigates alternative  approaches that include track turn around investment before the flood zone.  For drainage systems and pumping, SEPTA has made and will continue to make these types of  investments when prudent. With respect to bridge scour FHWA and FTA have a strong set of regulations  and protocols for bridge scour and their remediation. SEPTA follows those regulations and procedures.  To the extent that green infrastructure solutions work and prove to be more cost effective for the useful  life of the investment SEPTA will make such investments.  Operations and Maintenance (O&M)  SEPTA has in place plans and procedures for temporarily hardening assets, re‐routing contingency plans  during an event, redundant communications, and some redundant power..  Communication with  customers is considered critical to readiness, and SEPTA uses available communication tools (social  media, press releases to TV and radio outlets, text messages and emails) to inform customers about  service disruptions, service delays or service cancelations in severe weather emergencies.  In SEPTA’s asset management program, the asset management database includes information on  previous maintenance and issues, manufacturer’s warranties and service schedules, front‐line staff  observations and reports, calculations for when the next maintenance service is needed and scheduled.  The asset management plan also includes activities that are preventative such as tree trimming,  embankment assessments and tree stability, cleaning critical drains, etc. in advance of normal weather  events, like heavy rains or winter.  Emergency Preparedness  SEPTA has developed the following emergency preparedness documents, housed in SEPTA’s System  Safety Division:   Emergency Management Plan  Emergency Operations Plans (Mode‐Specific)  Emergency Response Plans (Mode‐Specific)

B‐112  SEPTA also has developed emergency weather plans that address preparedness, response and recovery  for extreme weather events. In the context of these emergency weather plans, SEPTA works with its  partner agencies to inform them of what to expect from SEPTA in the case of a weather emergency; and,  to coordinate preparedness, response and recovery.   SEPTA’s Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP) identifies essential management and staff and identifies  clear lines of succession for decision making. The plan has specific protocols for canceling service(s) and  informing customers, identifying and broadcasting service disruptions and estimated service recovery;  prioritized recovery of service (from the center out), including track and bridge inspections; emergency  power and refueling sites. Managers and essential personnel annual emergency training are expected to  attend and to review the EMP.  References  1. Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority. 2012. A Vulnerability and Risk Assessment of SEPTA’S Manayunk/Norristown Line. Laura Zale and Erik Johanson, August 7, 2012. 2. Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority. 2013. A Vulnerability and Risk Assessment of SEPTA’s Regional Rail ‐ A Transit Climate Change Adaptation Assessment Pilot, August 2013.  3. Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority. FTA Funding for SEPTA Infrastructure Resilience Program (one page summary provided by SEPTA).  4. Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority. 2014. “Resilience: The New Reality.” PowerPoint presentation to Partnering for Regional Sustainability by Jeffrey D. Knueppel (then Deputy  General Manager, now General Manager).  5. Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority. 2013. Using Asset Management Principles to Operate a Legacy Transit System During a Capital Funding Crisis. Presented at 2013 APTA Rail  Conference by Jeffrey D. Knueppel, PE Deputy General Manager, and Laura J. Zale, Senior Asset  Management Analyst.

Next: Swedish Transportation Administration (STA) »
Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Web Only Document 70: Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies includes appendicies that outline the literature reviewed and 17 case studies that explore how transit agencies absorb the impacts of disaster, recover quickly, and return rapidly to providing the services that customers rely on to meet their travel needs. The report is accompanied by Volume 1: A Guide, Volume 2: Research Overview, and a database called resilienttransit.org to help practitioners search for and identify tools to help plan for natural disasters.

This website is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

TRB hosted a webinar that discusses the research on March 12, 2018. A recording is available.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!