National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority (HART)
Page 310
Suggested Citation:"Idaho Valley Regional Transit (VRT)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 310
Page 311
Suggested Citation:"Idaho Valley Regional Transit (VRT)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 311
Page 312
Suggested Citation:"Idaho Valley Regional Transit (VRT)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 312
Page 313
Suggested Citation:"Idaho Valley Regional Transit (VRT)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 313
Page 314
Suggested Citation:"Idaho Valley Regional Transit (VRT)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 314

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

B‐14  Idaho Valley Regional Transit (VRT)  Case Study:  Boise City, ID  Highlights:  VRT, a small regional public transportation authority operating in Ada (Boise City) and  Canyon counties in Idaho, takes a very practical approach to resilience planning and adoption.   Grounded in concepts of sustainability, asset management, and emergency preparedness, VRT focuses  on “event readiness” and restoring service as quickly as possible after an event.  The primary threats  facing the agency include high heat and flash flooding from severe storms and stream flooding from  rapid snowmelt.  VRT incorporates basic vulnerability and risk assessment approaches, as part of its  service planning, ensuring its assets remain in a state of good repair for as long as possible.  Agency Details  Geographic Location  West  Modes Operated  Bus, demand response, oversees two private transit services  Vehicles Operated [all modes](2014)  Annual Boardings (2014)  Bus: 1,428,551 passenger trips, Demand Response: 181,000  passenger trips  Typical Hazards  High heat, wind, occasional flooding, cold  Background:  Valley Regional Transit (VRT) is a small regional public transportation authority for Ada  (Boise City is in Ada county) and Canyon counties, but it is the largest transit system in Idaho.  VRT was  created by a ballot initiative in 1998. VRT is managed by an Executive Director who reports to a 28‐ member board of directors.  VRT provides transit service to:   Metropolitan Boise, Idaho with nineteen routes operate in Ada, County;  Six‐day‐per‐week service to Boise and its immediate suburbs;  Five local and one flex routes servicing Canyon County that run Monday – Friday;  Five inter‐county commuter lines that run Monday ‐ Friday; o Both a peak hour express route and an all‐day limited‐stop version of the same route connect Nampa and Meridian; o Boise State University connectivity with the College of Western Idaho in Nampa; and, o Two limited express service of one roundtrip each; one connects Caldwell and Boise and the other links Boise with the small towns of Star and Middleton. VRT is directly responsible for:   Overseeing the management of Valley Ride transit services in Treasure Valley, which is coordinating transit services in two counties managed by two private firms that are responsible for the daily operations of fixed route services in inter‐county services and one shuttle (serves the College of Western Idaho), and one dial‐a‐ride service.

B‐15  VRT’s vision is a region with adequate and secure funding to support public transportation options  designed to meet the needs of citizens and businesses and to support livable, healthy, and sustainable  communities. Its organizational mission is to develop and manage transportation resources and to  coordinate the effective and efficient delivery of safe transportation options to the region’s citizens.   Boise is considered a high desert area and its location shields it from most extreme weather patterns  found in other states and regions in the United States. High heat, occasional flooding, strong winds, cold  temperatures are the expected weather events for the communities. Therefore, VRT has not  experienced a major disaster related to a natural or weather event to date.  Consequently, VRT has not done severe weather planning. The agency’s approach to severe weather is  very practical: planners and operators know what roads are likely to occasionally flood and reroute the  bus trips until the road is clear. Snow events of 10 inches or more are a rarity. VRT and its communities  just close down when such a blizzard events occurs. Currently, emergency management governance is  managed by the Executive Director, Director of Operations and the Chairperson of the Board. VRT works  with the emergency management agencies in the area.  The FTA’s effort on resiliency for transit properties to extreme weather and the TCRP effort have  prompted VRT to consider resiliency as a concept and planning in response to severe weather events.  Sustainability has been the agency’s major approach to VRT’s emerging asset management program.  The transit asset management program suggested by the FTA has VRT developing a regional policy and  program for VRT and other public transportation providers in the two‐county region.  VRT is prompted  by financial issues that require maximizing the useful life of investments. The agency does some risk  analyses and vulnerability assessments with respect to sustainability of the system, and in terms of  planning for new services in the communities served. However, these analyses are more focused on  financial issues and ridership.   VRT is interested in learning about other transit efforts to be considered in future planning and service  efforts, and how that may help them to be better prepared for severe weather planning.  VRT’s Severe Weather‐Related Conditions  VRT’s service area experiences occasional heavy rains, flash floods, flooding (foothill run off and snow  melt,) extreme heat, high winds, extreme cold and snow/ ice, lightning, winter storms, and  wildfires/dense smoke.  Its natural disaster related conditions: occasional small earthquakes.  Recent climate‐related events:   2015 saw record heat waves exceeding historical records for example Boise’ June 2015 temperatures topped 106 degrees on a Saturday, breaking the previous record of 104, set in 1892, and on that Sunday, the 110 degree temperature broke the previous record of 102, set in 2010.   Severe thunderstorms in the foothills can result in flash flooding and mud slides.  The peak season for thunderstorms are June ‐ September.

B‐16   High runoff can occur from the foothills from rapid snowmelt, especially when warm rain falls on existing snow pack. In these situations, flow rates may not rise rapidly but may last for several days or weeks.  Only twelve (12) tornadoes have been documented within the county and city. Most days of snowfall in Boise leaves just a skiff, amounting to less than an inch of fresh snow on the ground. For seven days a year on average, the amount of new snow totals at least an inch. (The area can get 3 ‐4 inches of snow in a single setting, but that is usually just once per season, if at all.)  Heavy snowstorms are uncommon for Boise. Snowstorms of over five inches a day normally don't occur most years. Major blizzards that dump ten inches or more in one day do not typically occur. Consequences of severe weather events 2010‐2015 included no service cancelations, but some re‐ routing due to possible snow storms.  VRT is working toward building a culture to be event‐ready and sustainable. This includes training,  building on and celebrating success, development of plans and policies designed to be implemented to  sustainability. VRT in a limited and requested way is working with various public partners in planning,  funding, operations and communications to ensure each player understands their role and function and  to understand how each fit together and affect others.  The agency is continuously engages front‐line  employees, and part of the employee training has included weather events. The “resiliency” piece is  called sustainability and is part of asset management.  Policy and Administration  VRT is committed to providing safe mobility to its customers and the community. Its policy on  sustainability and its pursuit of asset management are intended to meet the commitment. The asset  management program is based on life cycle to achieve the maximum useful life of the investments; and  VRT planners are identifying processes and areas of vulnerability to achieve equipment maximum useful  life.  VRT uses social media tools, television announcements, public presentations, and radio to inform their  customers and the public of VRT events, services, and changes to services. These tools would be used in  the event of severe weather emergency and changes to services.   Systems Planning  Both asset management and the sustainability units in conjunction with operations look at system  planning to assess what is working and what needs for analyses exist for employees and equipment. VRT  does not use any metric to measure weather vulnerabilities, other than how fast can service be restored  and event readiness. Given VRT’s oversight responsibilities of the two private transit providers, the  agency does undertake a full transit system plan and analyses for the Boise region.  Asset Management  VRT is beginning its asset management program and it is following APTA’s definition. VRT is just  beginning to assess its State of Good Repair (SGR) costs. 

B‐17  The asset management program involves at least three elements:    Vehicle and infrastructure maintenance management system with inventories, conditions and life cycle and maintenance management;  SGR database, which includes a capital asset inventory and investment priorities; and,  Asset management planning that includes policies on how assets are to be maintained through the assets’ life cycle. VRT is developing a full inventory system that is based, in part, on conversations with front‐line staff and  divisions on critical asset areas.  There are plans for the asset management system to identify  vulnerabilities and risks.  Capital Planning, Programming and Finance  VRT receives no state revenues. For local revenue, VRT is dependent upon the voluntary annual  contributions of the communities they serve. The majority of VRT’s funding is from the Federal  Government, followed by local grants and transit generated revenues. The local match is intended to  match the federal funds and cover most of VRT’s operating costs.  The federal funding for VRT and its other services is a bit complicated and accounts for some of the  elements of transit services being somewhat fractured:   Preventative maintenance budget for Boise and Canyon County is 80 percent federal to 20 percent local match;  VRT operating budget is 100 percent local for the large urban area, because Boise is too large a city to receive any federal operating assistance;  In contrast, Nampa receives federal funds up to 50% with a 50% local match for operations. VRT does have a capital investment strategy within its 5‐, 10‐ and 20‐year plans. Those strategies will be  altered or updated once VRT has a fully functional asset management program; full assessment of its  state of good repair backlog; and, a financial analysis on what level of investment would be required to  address the emerging SGR projects over the next 20 years. VRT works with the MPO on the capital  program and multiyear transportation plans.  Funding for VRT, as with all transit agencies is limited and requires a commitment to target resources to  high priorities. Both VRT’s 5‐year and 20‐year plans have critical projects and investments to provide for  VRT’s future.  Resiliency was not incorporated into the plans, but sustainability assessment and  programs from which projects or systems are prioritized use FTA’ sustainability guidance. VRT does not  conduct cost‐benefit analyses for new projects.  Project Development, Infrastructure Design and Construction  Within the asset management and sustainability framework, using common sense and in conversations  with its staff, VRT regularly reviews its needs and equipment. 

B‐18  Operations and Maintenance (O&M)  With respect to questions 1 and 2 (agency having plans to harden infrastructure, like sand bags, and  contingency plans to allow for re‐routing) the answer is yes.  Question 5 (sharing information with  customers) is also yes, VRT uses the available communication tools (social media, press releases to TV  and radio outlets, text messages and emails) to inform their customers about service disruptions, service  delays or service cancelations in severe weather emergencies.  VRT has regular maintenance and inspection activities to monitor all of its assets. It does not have  specific activities for vulnerable infrastructure and assets because it does not have those issues.  Emergency Preparedness  VRT has an emergency management plan (EMP) that is reviewed annually, but focused on operations  and getting service restored as quickly as possible. The EMP involves representatives from VRT’s front‐ line troops. VRT does work with other public agencies to inform them of what to expect from VRT in the  case of a weather emergency.  The plan has specific protocols for canceling service(s) and informing customers, identifying and  broadcasting service disruptions and estimated service recovery.  Designated managers and essential  personnel undergo emergency training.  References  1. Recommended Projection of Sea Level Rise in the Tampa Bay Region, Tampa Bay Climate Science Advisory Panel, August, 2015  2. Hillsborough County MPO: Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Pilot Project, Cambridge Systematics, October, 2014 

Next: Kansas City Transit Authority (KCATA) »
Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Web Only Document 70: Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies includes appendicies that outline the literature reviewed and 17 case studies that explore how transit agencies absorb the impacts of disaster, recover quickly, and return rapidly to providing the services that customers rely on to meet their travel needs. The report is accompanied by Volume 1: A Guide, Volume 2: Research Overview, and a database called resilienttransit.org to help practitioners search for and identify tools to help plan for natural disasters.

This website is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

TRB hosted a webinar that discusses the research on March 12, 2018. A recording is available.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!