National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Idaho Valley Regional Transit (VRT)
Page 315
Suggested Citation:"Kansas City Transit Authority (KCATA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 315
Page 316
Suggested Citation:"Kansas City Transit Authority (KCATA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 316
Page 317
Suggested Citation:"Kansas City Transit Authority (KCATA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 317
Page 318
Suggested Citation:"Kansas City Transit Authority (KCATA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 318
Page 319
Suggested Citation:"Kansas City Transit Authority (KCATA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 319
Page 320
Suggested Citation:"Kansas City Transit Authority (KCATA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 320
Page 321
Suggested Citation:"Kansas City Transit Authority (KCATA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 321
Page 322
Suggested Citation:"Kansas City Transit Authority (KCATA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 322
Page 323
Suggested Citation:"Kansas City Transit Authority (KCATA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 323
Page 324
Suggested Citation:"Kansas City Transit Authority (KCATA)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 324

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

B‐19  Kansas City Transit Authority (KCATA)  Case Study:  Kansas City, MO  Highlights:  KCATA is a bi‐state transportation agency operating in the Kansas City Metropolitan area.   The agency is in the preliminary stages of developing a comprehensive strategy to incorporate resilience  into its management plan for both emergency situations and as an approach to mitigating the effects of  climate change, in particular extreme temperatures.  The agency’s resilience efforts are focused on  “preparedness” and “service restoration” when weather‐related disruptions occur.  KCATA relies heavily  on the knowledge of managers and front‐line workers to identify assets, infrastructure and services  potentially vulnerable to extreme weather and works closely with the Mid‐America Regional Council  (MARC), the region’s MPO, to coordinate system planning across its seven‐county service area.  KCATA  has also begun to use green infrastructure best management practices, such as permeable pavement in  its facility designs to help mitigate flooding risk.  Key Resiliency Drivers   State and local legislation  Leadership  Facilities  Emergency Management Plan for Natural Disasters  Service Restoration Plan  Leadership Key Successes   Building energy resilience into facilities and asset management  Service Restoration Plan implemented following weather events  Collaboration and relationship‐building with other area agencies  Capacity assistance for other agencies during events outside own jurisdiction  Leadership conducts preparedness meetings in advance of weather events  Alternative fuel and energy sources will help financial stability in the long‐run  Major downtown area celebration was an exercise in implementing procedures to transport large population; area‐wide emergency event simulation  Asset listing is being implemented for asset management  Approximately 15% of the fleet fueled by alternative energy in order to build financial resiliency and free funding for capital improvement projects Key Lessons Learned   Working with neighboring municipalities and building relationships in the wider region allows for greater resource allocation in the event of a disaster or emergency

B‐20   Development of a comprehensive strategy to address climate change is a broad effort that requires a multi‐pronged approach with both near‐term and long‐term considerations  Working with other local agencies such as police and fire, as well as outside contractors will provide key assistance during an event  Never sacrifice safety or security for meeting performance goals  Equipment maintenance and preparation when severe weather is anticipated is paramount to asset management  A diverse portfolio incorporating multiple funding sources and alternative energy sources ensures financial resiliency Agency Details  Geographic Location  Midwest  Modes Operated  MB, vanpool, paratransit  Vehicles Operated (2013)  400 buses (31 BRT buses) on 89 routes  Annual Unlinked Trips (2012)  16.1 Million  Typical Hazards  Urban Flooding, Severe Winter Storms, Severe Heat,  Tornadoes  Background:  Public transit in Kansas City began similarly as many major North American cities during  the horse car and cable car era.  The first streetcars in 1870 were horse‐powered, and gave way to  electrified streetcars by 1908.  At the zenith of streetcar popularity, there were 25 routes throughout  Kansas City – one of the most extensive networks in the United States.  However, with the advent of the  automobile, public transportation fell out of favor, simultaneously shutting down many public  transportation routes in the metropolitan area.  The last streetcar route was closed in 1957.  Some area  streetcar history is still evident and some former streetcar routes have been converted to trails.  Recent  developments in the public transportation system includes a streetcar for a length of Main Street in the  downtown area by Spring 2016, and studies are currently being conducted to determine viability for  extensions of the Main Street Line.  By the 1960s, buses gained favor in the public transportation realm, and in 1969 the Kansas City Area  Transportation Authority (KCATA) began operations after it took over bus routes previously run by the  Kansas City Public Service Company.  Headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri, just over two miles from  the Kansas border, it is a bi‐state agency formed by an interstate compact between Missouri and Kansas  incorporating seven counties on both sides of the state line – Cass, Clay, Jackson, and Platte counties in  Missouri, and Johnson, Leavenworth and Wyandotte counties in Kansas.  KCATA is governed by a board  of ten commissioners comprised of five individuals from each state.  Within its system, KCATA has over 6,500 bus stops with about 64,800 riders per day on average.  Each  municipality contracts with the agency for bus transit services, which includes the operations and  maintenance (O&M), information technology, and financial planning company‐wide.  While resiliency  planning within the agency is in its preliminary stages regarding policy and procedures, asset  management, O&M, finances, and emergency preparedness, the heads of these departments are 

B‐21  beginning to move toward implementing a comprehensive approach that will help the system bounce  back from shocks during natural disasters or weather‐related events.  Policy and Administration  Summary:  Policy is set by the Board of Commissioners and implemented by the Chief Operations Officer  (COO), Chief Financial Officer (CFO), and Chief Executive Officer (CEO).  The Board of Commissioners is a  ten‐member group made up of an equal number from the state of Kansas and the state of Missouri,  respectively.  The Commissioners in Kansas are appointed either by County Commissioners (one from Johnson County  and one from Leavenworth County) or the Mayor in Kansas City Kansas.  If the Commissioner is one of  the three appointed by the Mayor, there is a newly implemented requirement that he or she also must  be approved by the city commissioners.  In Missouri, the Mayor of Kansas City appoints three of the five  Commissioners; one of which is a direct appointment and must be a Kansas City, Missouri resident.  The  other two are appointed from a list of eligible candidates provided by Clay and Platte County  Commissioners.  Only one from each county list may be appointed by the Mayor.  One commissioner  must be appointed by the Jackson County Executive and must represent a community that contracts  with KCATA other than Kansas City, and the remaining commissioner, nominated by the County  Commission, must reside in Cass County, be appointed by the Governor, and confirmed by the tate  Senate.  KCATA is the regional collector of state and federal DOT funds.  The agency is contracted by local  municipalities to provide service and manage general operations, and the Board of Directors sets policy,  which is administered and implemented by the Chief Operations Officer.  The Chief Operations Officer  also holds preparedness meetings in advance of forecasted weather events and institutes public  communication in case of service interruption during such an event.  While the COO hands down  policies, staff department heads are given a voice and feel that decisions are made “jointly” and they  “come together” to share responsibility. The agency is also in the process of utilizing a recent grant to  implement a Security Emergency Plan that will likely include agency‐wide tabletop exercises to help  institutionalize emergency response procedures and educate staff in various departments.  The agency is currently in preliminary stages of setting goals toward resiliency and refers to this process  as “preparedness” or “service restoration” regarding policy planning for severe weather events.  These  plans encompass the implementation of procedures that will “ramp up service” following an event that  creates moderate delays.  Successes:   A dialogue has begun regarding policies that will help move the agency toward greater resilience.  The agency has been awarded a grant to implement Security Emergency Plan (SEP) tabletop exercises, and an opportunity to bring a multitude of perspectives to Resiliency Planning while educating employees.

B‐22  Lessons Learned:   While resiliency is in beginning stages of development, it is not yet implemented holistically.  A culture of joint decision making in all aspects makes pushing new and upcoming priorities such as resiliency more easily implemented. System Planning  Summary:  While changing weather conditions due to climate change have not been priority, and sea  level rise is not an issue, extreme weather fluctuations in the region create an atmosphere in which all  potential weather events are considered on an ongoing basis.  Due to potential extreme cold in winter  and the extreme heat in summer, roads are under perpetual construction and evaluation for wear and  tear, and KCATA employees are provided opportunities to provide information about road conditions  and potential hazards.  Performance is monitored and assessed on a weekly basis for key milestones on an internal network  “Dashboard”.  The Mid‐America Regional Council (MARC), a regional planning agency located in Kansas  City, plays a key intermediary role in coordinating system planning across the seven‐county system  helping to bring everyone to the table to discuss best practices and approach.  Aiding in the planning  process, amenities at each location are mapped and the interdependent linkages that apply outside the  agency itself are part of the discussion.  Since the public transit system is currently single‐mode, redundancy is built into the system by simply  providing additional resources when needed and nearby agencies may assist with an extreme event if  necessary.  However, as the streetcar is implemented and perhaps expanded, the agency will consider  how to operate in the eventuality that service is interrupted along the route, either due to flooding or  some hazard that damages rail infrastructure for an extended period of time.  Energy conservation is an aspect of resiliency the agency considers in its effort to build redundancy.  In  light of considering alternative fuel sources to diversify their energy portfolio, KCATA has begun building  a fleet of compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles that are more energy efficient and cleaner burning than  their diesel counterparts.  By 2017 KCATA estimates the fleet will be 65% CNG vehicles.  Generators also  back up facilities during power outages.  While the agency has started to create a system by which it can proceed into the future with a diverse  tool kit for remaining viable, the system is not yet evaluated by useful metrics to determine capacity for  bouncing back from a major event.  The agency does, however, iterate that “bouncing back” should  never sacrifice the safety of either its employees or its customers.  In other words, restoring  performance is a priority, but the highest priority is its people.  Successes:   Discussions are underway to address phasing of service during major snow events or extreme winter weather during which roads are impassable  Mapped amenities at stops and facilities providing a geographic breakdown and visual representation of location and attributes

B‐23   Consideration in the systems planning realm of linkages between interdependencies and critical systems outside the agency’s control  Developed inter‐state relations over the years and have come together to provide service to the bi‐state area, overcoming various political barriers  Upgrade to alternative fuels, diversifying energy sources toward energy independence Lessons Learned:   Building relationships with outside agencies is helpful when expedient resources are needed in an emergency  The agency could build capacity to bounce back from events if metrics are developed to understand where deficiencies in the system lie and would help the agency set goals to improve systems planning  Sacrificing safety for expedient return to services after a disaster or event is not an option  Providing employees with opportunities for feedback and addressing their concerns and needs are paramount to a resilient company, as they are the resources that respond and perform during an event Asset Management  The Kansas City area experiences extreme temperature fluctuations in summer and winter months,  including ice and snowstorms, drought and ozone alerts. It is number one among cities with the most  populous metro areas for unpredictable weather (3). It is not uncommon for locals to experience  freezing temperatures one day and leave home in short sleeves the next day––indicative of the local  saying, “If you don’t like the weather in Kansas City, just wait five minutes”.  In January 2013,  temperatures dipped to 8 degrees, and the next day residents could be seen jogging without shirts on a  sunny, 74‐degree afternoon (2).  These types of extreme conditions pose unique challenges to vehicles  and equipment for transit agencies.  KCATA has had an Asset Management Plan in place for the last 25 years.  Although the Chief Finance  Officer was not able to be present during the interview, other Heads of Department provided  information regarding asset management and key takeaways regarding the agency’s Asset  Management.  Assets under KCATA authority undergo rigorous performance checks, and both equipment and facilities  endure routine maintenance on a regular basis.  Because equipment is evaluated regularly, some assets  have outlasted their estimated lifecycle.  Financial constraints dictate that some equipment must  contribute to the system beyond their estimated lifetime, but regular conditions checks and  maintenance helps ensure the agency gains maximum return on investment.  As mentioned, one key vulnerability is overstretched funding.  Therefore, KCATA is continuously tracking  new funding sources, but have made key investments in technology solutions to monitor facility  conditions so that vulnerabilities can be tracked.  This technology allows some advance warning of  pending failures due to weather changes.  However, the current technological system is not robust 

B‐24  enough to flag potential vulnerabilities that may have not been previously identified.  The system in  place relies heavily on employee identification of infrastructure vulnerabilities.  Successes:   The Asset Management Plan supplies guidelines for evaluating equipment, vehicles and facilities, providing a working system to predetermine where equipment failures may occur and to maintain equipment longevity.  Well‐documented assets and routine maintenance ensures maximum return on investments. Lessons Learned:   Better technological solutions could help track assets and provide key vulnerability identification within the system Capital Planning, Programming and Finance  Capital Projects for KCATA are funded by federal, state, and local dollars. Capital improvements  recommendations are brought to the table by department heads and reviewed in light of the Strategic  Plan and regional goals identified partially through MARC.  Identified needs and wants regarding capital  improvement project prioritization follows the order of highest need.  Ultimately, the CEO, COO, and  CFO are primary decision makers and must come to a consensus identifying which projects receive  funding during the fiscal year.  The budget allocates funds for a 5‐year time period developed around projects prioritized during  monthly meetings among department leadership.  Each year, priority reassessment and fund  reallocation follows budget review.  Department heads stated during the interview that the time horizon  for engineering projects was likely more long term than other department plans, possibly a 25‐year  timeframe.  As with many agencies, KCATA must weigh long‐term benefits with short‐term costs and decide how  best to manage funds.  This is a balancing act KCATA is familiar with, but has not identified key metrics  or a written strategy that acts as a guidebook for the process.  At this time, key players identify needs  and discuss at monthly meetings, propose a budget, and leadership comes to a consensus.  For now, the  system in place has been successful, but no plans have been identified to consider how climate change  could affect the institutionalized system.  Successes:   Open communication and regular meetings with decision makers allow percolation of high priority projects throughout the process Lessons Learned:     Climate change considerations and a system to identify cost/benefit of long‐term investments should become part of prioritization process

B‐25  Project Development, Infrastructure Design and Construction  While KCATA has a strict program to maintain its facilities and equipment, they also take seriously the  responsibility of ensuring safety and accessibility of their customers, as well as environmental  protection.  Recent green infrastructure initiatives and environmental planning standards in Kansas City  have become an important focus of the city and its primary public transit agency has followed suit.  With  established ADA standards creating the need to readjust curb cuts, sidewalk corners, and access to  properties, redesign of public infrastructure has become necessary.  Recent improvements have begun in earnest, addressing safety hazards and environmental hazards in  an effort to practice good customer service and environmental stewardship.  While the benefits of these  initiatives have only begun to be realized, the social and fiscal advantages are expected to multiply as  more infrastructure projects are implemented.  For example, a park‐and‐ride location in the urban core  has recently undergone a high‐profile permeable pavement upgrade that includes native plants and  trees in its design.  Not only will these initiatives mitigate some flooding risk by decreasing the amount  of surface runoff during major rain events, the beautification of a major urban intersection has made it a  more pleasant place for passersby and public transit riders.  Area residents take pride in this location  and are more likely to respect public property such as bus stop shelters there, as well. Other initiatives  include solar‐powered electricity at some stops, efficient HVAC systems and LED bulbs within 95% of  facilities; all help build resilience into everyday operations.  Successes:   Improvements incorporating ADA compliance are underway at bus stops and facility locations.  Green infrastructure and alternative energy sources have been a consideration at key points in the city and upgrades are underway. Lessons Learned:   Resiliency efforts through design and construction can have multiple benefits to both the agency and the community as a whole.  While green infrastructure can mitigate environmental impacts, it can also beautify, prevent flood and safety hazards, and investments such as these also can improve neighborhood aesthetics.  Resiliency is a win‐win proposition fiscally, environmentally, and socially.

B‐26  Operations and Maintenance  Since KCATA serves multiple municipalities and is dependent upon those municipalities to provide basic  infrastructure services, operations that exceed basic fleet and facility maintenance are dependent upon  other city‐owned operations.  The KCATA does not deploy its own emergency operations crew in the  event of a major weather‐related disaster, nor does it have a system in place that temporarily hardens  infrastructure during an event.  For example, if major flooding occurs along a bus route, the agency does  not work independently to mitigate flood hazards by either deploying sandbags or other temporary  means; for this, other emergency management agencies may deploy flood mitigation strategies. KCATA  will reroute bus service in the event of a disaster and resume regular operations after safety concerns  are addressed.  The agency does have in place a redundant energy and communications strategy in the event that  power is interrupted.  They have a backup communications tower with limited functionality, and use  two‐way radios to dispatch and communicate with field crews.  The main facility has a backup generator  in case the building loses power during a storm or tornado event.  The agency also applied for a grant  that would provide a mobile emergency command center.  The grant was initially denied, but there are  plans to continue to search for other funding options.  The mobile command center is a potential next  step to improve resilient emergency operations.    Maintenance procedures are recorded and kept on record for 2‐3 years within a system called “Fleet  Watch”.  The data control system is a combination of hardware and software, providing accurate real‐ time control and data acquisition for vehicles, employees, fuel/fluids and tank monitoring systems.  The  system tracks vehicle mileage, monitors fuel and fluid usage, and helps schedule preventative  maintenance.  Data is recorded and available for analysis from any PC in a remote location.  This system  helps personnel maintain the fleet from a central data system, synchronizing data between multiple  facilities, and provides diagnostic reports in a categorical format regarding vehicles, employees, and  utilities.  The program also provides real‐time digital shelter signage, conveniently allowing customers to  track transportation times.  Successes:   Redundant communications and energy generation  Seeking funding sources for mobile emergency command center  Hardware and software program implementation to ensure fleet maintenance and performance within a synchronized, real‐time system Lessons Learned:   KCATA relies on other agencies to perform some temporary infrastructure hardening which could pose challenges, but may also have benefits; challenges can arise by being dependent on other systems and their reliability, but benefits may be that other agencies have more available resources to take on necessary tasks  Emergency operations and redundant power/communications are a necessary component of transportation system operational resiliency

B‐27  Emergency Preparedness  KCATA has an emergency management plan in case of severe weather, fire, and flood.  Earthquakes are  not common, but the New Madrid fault is in close enough proximity to warrant a contingency plan, as  well.  Currently, the agency is in the process of developing a pamphlet addressing these hazards.   Additionally, other local agencies collaborate and perform drills with KCATA to prepare in the event that  a major disaster occurs.  The EMP is consistent with the Federal Government’s National Incident  Management System and the agency is considering providing classes to employees with ICS classes and  training through the Transportation Safety Institute.  The agency coordinates regularly with federal, state, and local agencies including the EOC, FBI and  Homeland Security.  There is nothing in writing, but the agency will institute the safe, orderly, and  efficient shutdown of services in the event of a disaster or major weather event.  However, since the  transportation system operates within such a large land area, shut down and restoration of services  would be evaluated on a case‐by‐case basis.  Emergency system activation would depend upon Mayoral  state‐of‐emergency declaration.  The implementation of safety and emergency exercises regarding  streetcar operations have been conducted and continue to be conducted until the new line is in  operation.  Restoration of services following an event depends upon severity of the event and the availability of  mutual aid.  KCATA contracts with other nearby agencies to provide/receive aid in an event in which  additional resources are required.  This mutual aid agreement ensures services can continue if an event  causes loss of equipment and/or fuel.  It would take an estimated week to ten days, for example, to  receive aid from St. Louis, over two hundred miles away.  Successes:   The EMP has been developed and a “quick‐guide” pamphlet is in process  Regular coordination with federal, state, and local agencies to maintain open dialogue  Mutual aid with partnering agencies has been established Lessons Learned:   EMP in place helps address a crisis with actionable items and agreed upon procedures  Established relationships with partners helps ensure system restoration following a major event on an as‐needed basis References  1. KCATA Organizational Chart. 2016. Print 2. Eligon, John. 2013. "An Unusual Weather Turn Even for the Midwest: 8 Degrees Quickly Becomes 74." The New York Times. The New York Times, 28 Jan. 2013. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.  3. Silver, Nate, and Reuben Fischer‐Baum. 2014. "Which City Has The Most Unpredictable Weather?" FiveThirtyEight. N.p., 04 Dec. 2014. Web. 24 Feb. 2016 

B‐28  4. "FLEETWATCH Fluid Management Systems." FLEETWATCH Fluid Management Systems. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Feb. 2016.   5. Rouse, David C. 2013. Green Infrastructure: A Landscape Approach. Vol. Report Number 571. Chicago, IL: American Planning Association. Print  6. Rubin, Jonathan. 2008. "Transportation and Climate Change." Maine Policy Review 17.2: 115 ‐119, http://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/mpr/vol17/iss2/18 

Next: Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro) »
Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Web Only Document 70: Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies includes appendicies that outline the literature reviewed and 17 case studies that explore how transit agencies absorb the impacts of disaster, recover quickly, and return rapidly to providing the services that customers rely on to meet their travel needs. The report is accompanied by Volume 1: A Guide, Volume 2: Research Overview, and a database called resilienttransit.org to help practitioners search for and identify tools to help plan for natural disasters.

This website is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

TRB hosted a webinar that discusses the research on March 12, 2018. A recording is available.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!