National Academies Press: OpenBook

Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies (2017)

Chapter: Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro)

« Previous: Kansas City Transit Authority (KCATA)
Page 325
Suggested Citation:"Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 325
Page 326
Suggested Citation:"Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 326
Page 327
Suggested Citation:"Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 327
Page 328
Suggested Citation:"Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 328
Page 329
Suggested Citation:"Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 329
Page 330
Suggested Citation:"Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 330
Page 331
Suggested Citation:"Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 331
Page 332
Suggested Citation:"Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 332
Page 333
Suggested Citation:"Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro)." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24972.
×
Page 333

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

B‐29  Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro)  Case Study:  Los Angeles, CA  Highlights:  LA Metro is at the forefront of incorporating resilience holistically across nearly all of its  business functions to address both infrastructure and operational resiliency. The agency has integrated  resilience considerations into its Environmental Management System (EMS), which helps to retain a  focus on resilience in agency decisions related to maintenance, operations, and capital project  development.  LA Metro has developed a Resiliency Indicator Framework, which provides a  comprehensive set of metrics to track infrastructure, and operational resiliency over time.  LA Metro is  in the process of developing a comprehensive Resiliency Policy and is updating its infrastructure and  facility design criteria and construction specifications to include resilience in all capital project  construction, operations and maintenance activities.   Key Resiliency Drivers   Executive leadership;  Success in obtaining grant funding to address resiliency;  Pilot project successes in understanding climate change and system vulnerabilities which in turn enhances executive leadership and front‐line personnel buy‐in; Key Successes   Receiving ISO 14001 certification for its EMS in all bus and rail facilities.  Advancing resiliency and climate adaptation efforts through funding from grants and financial sources outside of the agency budget.  Advancing a holistic approach to implementing and operationalizing resiliency.  Implementing a method to track agency performance regarding the implementation and incorporation of climate change and resiliency agency‐wide. Key Lessons Learned   Utilizing an EMS provides for the ability address resiliency holistically incorporating agency‐wide and specifically departmental constraints. Resiliency efforts, regardless of magnitude, should be discussed as an important of agency plans and efforts.  Continual discussions and meetings can enhance agency understanding of resiliency and act as a surrogate for training.  Approaching climate change through discussion of resiliency to extreme/severe weather events or operational challenges allowed for ready employee buy‐in. Agency Details  Geographic Location  West Coast  Modes Operated  HR, MB, LR, DR  Vehicles Operated [all modes](2013)  3,372 

B‐30  Annual Unlinked Trips (2013)  476,299,313  Typical Hazards  Earthquake, Urban Flooding, Mudslides, Wildfires, Wind, Sea  Level Rise, Dust Storms, Heat  Background:  The original transit agency, which the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation  Authority (LA Metro) was created from, was established in 1873. However, transit rail service ended  during the middle of the 20th century.  Roughly 25 years ago, LA Metro began re‐establishing transit rail  service throughout Los Angeles County. As such, its rail network is relatively new in comparison to many  of the transit systems across the country. The agency is a state chartered special jurisdiction and not  county owned or operated. It is responsible for planning, constructing, operating and to a certain extent  funding all transportation systems in Los Angeles County.   The agency operates heavy and light rail as well as bus service and on demand service throughout the  county.  It also partially funds Metrolink (which is the regional rail [multi‐county] operator) as well as  other transit systems run by municipalities.    In 2008, a measure was approved by voters to expand the  current system.  The expansion will account for twice as many stations (80 to nearly 200) and about  twice as many rail miles (about 200 to 400 rail miles).  At this writing, LA Metro has a potential ballot  initiative that seeks to indefinitely extend the current measure as well as another tax increase to fund  transportation systems across LA County.  In the context of the voter approved system expansion that will ultimately double the size of its rail  network, increase capacity of the current system, and expand active mobility networks, LA Metro staff  took advantage of the opportunity to think through the long‐term impacts climate change and extreme  weather could have on the system expansion.  Incorporation of climate change adaptation and resiliency  strategies was determined to be a necessary in terms of planning and constructing the system  expansion.  To achieve this end, staff sought external funding through grants and successfully completed a number  of projects including the implementation of an Environmental Management System (EMS) and a pilot  project through the FTA Climate Change Adaptation Initiative building upon the EMS.  These successes  have been recognized by LA Metro executives and as a result, the agency’s Environmental Compliance  and Sustainability Department (ECSD) has full backing to continue the work.  In addition, LA Metro has  developed metrics to understand the progress the agency has made in becoming more resilient, while  maintaining awareness of continued gaps in both infrastructure and operational resiliency through a  Resiliency Indicator Framework (RIF).  This framework supports, measures and prioritizes actions to  maintain and enhance resiliency.  Policy and Administration  Summary:   LA Metro is a state chartered special jurisdiction serving the county of Los Angeles.  It is  governed by a 13‐member Board of Directors.  The board sets agency policy and provides direction to  the CEO who is then responsible for implementing the Board’s directives agency‐wide.  The CEO is  supported by a tier of senior executives who each manage various business units within LA Metro.   Although LA Metro Board has not adopted a specific resilience policy, it has adopted a number of 

B‐31  policies related to use of renewable energy, sustainability, reducing the agency’s impacts on the  environment, green construction and water use and conservation.    LA Metro’s Environmental Compliance and Sustainability Department (ECSD) is overseen by an Executive  Officer who provides primary support for environmental, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and  resiliency efforts within LA Metro.  LA Metro defines resiliency as “The ability of a system to respond to  threats and changing conditions by resisting damage, recovering quickly and continuing to provide its  essential services.”  Although the primary responsibility for addressing climate change related resiliency  falls within ECSD, LA Metro has been advancing a holistic approach through which all applicable  departments and divisions are increasingly becoming involved in the work managed by the ECSD.  ECSD  coordinates with planning, construction, operations, maintenance, and risk management personnel in  its efforts to operationalize resiliency agency‐wide.  The ECSD recognizes the close link between  resiliency and the agency’s sustainability programs, which allows for further integration into agency  policies.  An important tool used to advance resiliency within the agency is the Environmental Management  System (EMS). According to the FTA, an EMS is a set of processes and practices, which enables an  organization to reduce its environmental impacts and increase its operating efficiency.  LA Metro’s EMS  is managed by an Administrator who also oversees an Administrative Team.  Under the Administrative  Team are EMS Core Teams consisting of front‐line personnel at the Maintenance and Transportation  facilities.  The Administrative Team includes representatives from a variety of departments including ECSD, service  planning, procurement, homeland security/emergency management, bus and rail maintenance, facilities  maintenance, and transportation.  This group has an in‐depth knowledge regarding the EMS and works  to integrate (above environmental compliance and other EMS principles) climate change related  resiliency into agency decision making.  The Administrative Team is focused on identifying the “best  path forward” for the organization as a whole based on regular discussions on issues related to  environment and sustainability, including climate change.  EMS Core Teams include front‐line staff and  members of other business units who have a more functional knowledge of the EMS, but are directly  responsible for implementing the EMS processes and procedures developed by the Administrative Team  within their work areas.   As the work has progressed, the Core Teams’ implementation efforts have  become more adapted to their specific site conditions at each facility, while maintaining the core EMS  principles.    Systems Planning  Summary:    LA Metro has consistently made effective use of external funding to initiate and sustain its focus on  sustainability and resiliency.  The use of external funding–primarily from FTA–has helped to address one  of the barriers of resiliency adoption among transit agencies, namely limited resources and competing  priorities.  For example, LA Metro is a participant in the FTA’s Environmental Management Systems  Training and Assistance program.  LA Metro ECSD saw the FTA EMS program as an opportunity to utilize  EMS as a tool to operationalize adaptation and resiliency efforts at LA Metro.  They applied for and 

B‐32  received a grant in 2008.  The implementation of EMS resulted in ISO 14001 Certification for the Metro’s  Red and Purple Line rail yard; the first major rail maintenance facility in the nation to receive  certification.  In 2010, LA Metro completed a GHG Emissions Study, which led to the completion of a Climate Action  and Adaptation Plan (CAAP) in 2012 (1). The plan not only addresses climate change mitigation through  emissions reduction; it also includes climate adaptation strategies for increasing system resilience. Some  initial barriers encountered by LA Metro included “employee buy‐in” on the topic of climate change. To  facilitate discussions, the agency framed vulnerabilities in the context of extreme weather events as  these relate to the day‐to‐day operations and management that most of the staff is focused on. (2)  At the same time it was completing the CAAP, LA Metro once again sought funding through FTA and  became one of seven federally funded projects under the FTA’s Climate Change Adaptation pilot  program.  LA Metro’s participation in the Climate Adaptation pilot program allowed it to develop  detailed steps for integrating adaptation into its EMS (2). The FTA Pilot Project identified the CAAP as a  guide for LA Metro’s efforts for building the EMS adaptation module.  Additionally, the pilot project final  report recommended inclusion of resiliency data and consideration in other EMS modules and identified  more than 100 resilience‐related metrics in the categories of planning, operations, ridership and  adaptation.  These were narrowed down to seven metrics that LA Metro has been using for near‐term  measures.    Based on the findings of the pilot project and other related initiatives, LA Metro has updated its EMS  system to facilitate the more detailed integration of resiliency into agency decision making.  The success  of ECSD’s efforts have led to a sustained commitment on the part of senior management and the LA  Metro board to provide funding to continue the work.    Building on the pilot project metrics work, in December of 2015, LA Metro completed development of a  Resiliency Indicator Framework (RIF) (3). The RIF includes a series of metrics “designed to provide a  mechanism through which Metro can measure and prioritize actions to ensure that its assets and  networks are resilient in the face of climate change and related extreme weather events.” (4) LA Metro  defines resiliency as “the ability to provide core functions in the face of threats, and recover quickly  from major shocks or changing conditions.” (3) They define criticality as the “services and assets that are  essential to transporting Metro’s customers.” (1) The agency’s most critical assets and services include:   Bus and rail fleets;  Right‐of‐way on bus rapid transit (BRT) lines;  Heavy rail tracks, stations, and energy infrastructure;  Light rail tracks, stations, and energy infrastructure; and  Rail rehabilitation activities. These assets were chosen because they would be “extremely difficult or costly to replace or to  substitute.” (1) Critical facilities were ranked based on “ridership, connectivity to other parts of the  transit network, and whether they are the site of current or planned joint development projects.” (1)  Maintenance and administrative facilities were based on expert opinions.  The RIF study identified 

B‐33  actionable next steps such as incorporating resiliency into Long Range Transportation Plans, Short Range  Transportation plans, Metro Rail Design Criteria and an upcoming agency‐wide risk assessment.  In addition, the agency works closely with the City of LA including the LA City Mayor’s Office, the LA City  Department of Transportation, LA City Bureau of Sanitation, LA City Department of Public Works, LA City  Department of Water and Power, LA City Bureau of Street Services, and LA City Department of  Recreation and Parks.  LA Metro has a Memorandum of Understanding in place designed to coordinate  transportation planning, infrastructure siting and water pipeline planning related to LA Metro’s  infrastructure expansion projects.  Both the City and LA Metro are cooperating to make very long‐term  infrastructure investments within the City and County of Los Angeles, and to make such coordinated  efforts successful, the entities develop strategies to reduce institutional and infrastructural conflicts  between them.  There has also been conversation to explore alternative forms of financing for building  things like water recycling plants adjacent to nearby transit facilities for rail car/bus cleaning, irrigation,  and other community resiliency projects.     Successes:   Receiving ISO 14001 certification for the whole agency and institutionalizing the environmental management process to develop, implement and maintain resiliency efforts and projects.  Advancing resiliency and climate adaptation efforts through funding from grants and sources outside of the agency budget.  Advancing a holistic approach to implementing and operationalizing resiliency.  Developing a method to track agency performance regarding the implementation and incorporation of climate change and resiliency throughout the agency. Lessons Learned:   Utilizing an EMS provides for the ability address resiliency holistically incorporating all agency departments and divisions.  Resiliency should be considered as part of other agency plans and efforts.  Continual discussions and meetings can enhance agency understanding of resiliency and act as a surrogate for training; doubling as an avenue to gain employee buy‐in to the concept, process, and implementation structure.  Approaching climate change through discussion of resiliency to be fully relatable to staff’s front‐ line issues allowed for greater employee buy‐in. Tools:   Resiliency Indicator Framework (3) Asset Management and Capital Planning  LA Metro is in the process of updating its asset management system to comply with MAP‐21 and FAST  Act requirements.  In this regard, the agency’s risk management and asset management teams are  beginning to advance a more sophisticated asset management database.  The database development  team has been very open to including extreme weather event data from past events as well as 

B‐34  vulnerabilities to future threats.  The following is an example of how the agency’s asset management  framework changed to include resiliency:  In 2012, an extended period of high heat days stressed bus operation causing air  conditioning and other equipment failures and a significant increase in maintenance  personnel overtime to address the problems.  At the same time, LA Metro’s Climate  Action and Adaptation Plan was released.  The plan notes that more frequent high heat  days are a climate threat facing the agency.  In the wake of the high heat event, the  agency married its operational data with past weather events using data from NOAA.   This “marriage” of operational data from the asset management system allowed the  agency to see patterns of problems and take steps to address the problem with  enhanced asset management procedures.  LA Metro now starts an enhanced  preventative maintenance program three months prior to summer to improve  operational resiliency by reducing breakdowns.  This in turn has resulted in cost savings  for the agency in the form of less unnecessary overtime and expenses associated with  same.  In addition, operations data are now monitored more closely alongside weather  predictions and occurrences.    LA Metro is also working to address a current disconnect between its asset management systems and  the EMS.  The two systems are not yet fully integrated they are used differently in terms of internal  reporting.  The data contained in the EMS is frequently used to “flag” problems with infrastructure from  an environmental compliance and performance lens.  This has led to the identification of capital projects  to address the problems.  Reporting limitations inherent in the asset management systems make it  challenging to use the system in the same way.  For example, a persistently leaky roof at one of LA  Metro’s dated facilities was creating a range of public health and operational hazards.  EMS data was  used to show vulnerabilities in this regard, and highlight the possible consequences of these  vulnerabilities in the context of an impending El Niño event.  The health and operational issues  associated with the facility were being monitored using the EMS.  As a result, the facility’s vulnerability  to extreme weather made addressing the problem a higher priority than just a state of good repair  argument.  In the end, performance‐monitoring data from EMS helped to make the business case for  fixing the leaky roof.  Decision makers could see that doing so was a priority for safety, energy efficiency  and resilience reasons.    Another example of how resilience‐related asset management data was used by LA Metro to inform  capital project decision making has to do with overhead catenary systems, a critical piece of  infrastructure considered in the RIF.  LA Metro’s Gold line is particularly vulnerable to high heat days.  To  assess the magnitude of vulnerability, the agency overlaid high heat day data with infrastructure maps  to identify which catenary systems might be most at risk.  This led to a conversation with maintenance  personnel about what else should the agency be including to make the case for resiliency intervention  on the Gold line or system wide.  What they discovered was that many of the catenary system’s lead  weight counterbalances have no more room for adjustment.  Operations and maintenance personnel  noted that the lead weight tensioning systems have prematurely elongated to the ground in many  places, which prevents them from tensioning sagging catenaries.   

B‐35  By combining the vulnerability assessment data/mapping with the detailed knowledge of asset  conditions provided by front‐line workers, LA Metro was able to make a business case for  repairing/replacing the systems.  A standard asset management approach, which relies heavily on  recommended lifecycle replacement might not capture the need to for premature replacement.  The  infrastructure vulnerability lens sparked a conversation with asset management, operations,  maintenance personnel that flagged a significant operational problem that might otherwise have gone  unaddressed.   In the future, LA Metro hopes that a combined EMS + asset management system approach can result in  more win‐win‐win to capital projects. A step in this direction is the growing collaboration between ECSD  and the agency’s risk and asset management teams.  Both participate on the EMS advisory committee.    Successes:   Combining asset management data with data on weather patterns to identify problems and develop solutions that improve operational resilience.  Using resiliency‐related performance data contained with the EMS to identify capital projects that address multiple agency priorities as the same time. Lessons Learned:   Integrating EMS and asset management systems can be difficult.  The two systems function on different data platforms that must be reconciled over time.  Asset management systems are focused on monitoring state of good repair and tracking performance of individual assets.  Using the data to identify patterns of performance that relate to resilience requires new procedures and ways of using asset management data.  Resilience considerations can be a catalyst for conversation that leads to enhanced asset management approaches, which can ultimately improve operational resiliency. Project Development, Infrastructure Design and Construction  Summary:  LA Metro has a Design Criteria and Specifications document that guides infrastructure design and  construction.  The ECSD has complete ownership on the environmental section of the design standards.   Therefore, when updates are made on a regular basis to the design standards, ECSD can incorporate  resiliency adaptation strategies as part of the environmental requirements based on these standards.   Additionally, they may comment on other sections recommending changes to engineering and other  aspects of the design standards and specifications  In addition to internal knowledge, the ECSD must also adhere to external laws and regulations. One  example is the California Green Building Code.  This code outlines voluntary and required commitments.  Additionally, local ordinances regarding infrastructure may also need to be addressed. Although LA  Metro is a state chartered special jurisdiction and is not necessarily within the jurisdiction of local o  ordinances, it is the agency’s best practice to try and incorporate the ordinances into agency  specifications to reduce issues where agency infrastructure intersects with local infrastructure.  Additionally, the environmental review process for new projects is required to consider the greenhouse  gas emissions impacts of a project and if a significant impact is identified, mitigation measures are 

B‐36  developed and implemented.   This could result in actively implementing resiliency strategies during  construction and operations and maintenance of a project.  LA Metro now regularly utilizes a design‐build approach for its construction efforts.  All projects require  the development of a Sustainability Plan regardless of size.  ECSD staff works with contractors on what  can be done for resiliency and adaptation within the context of their Sustainability Plan commitments.   ECSD staff usually conducts one or two workshops for project designers and contractors once they are  awarded the bids to review sustainability and resiliency expectations.  For smaller projects, facilities and  maintenance, etc. LEED certification requirements bring in resiliency consideration in terms of  “greenness.”  Finally, for sustainability‐related capital program projects, a full life‐cycle cost analysis is  completed.    Successes:   Requiring all major capital projects to include a Sustainability Plan that actively addresses resiliency considerations.  Working cooperatively with design and construction vendors to incorporate sustainability and resilience considerations from the very early stages of project development. Operations, Maintenance, and Emergency Preparedness  Summary:  As mentioned previously, LA Metro utilizes enhanced maintenance procedures to improve the  operational resiliency of its bus fleet during summer months.  The agency also uses its routine  maintenance and inspections procedures to collect resilience‐related data that is incorporated in the  agency’s Environmental Management System and to inform capital planning decisions.    In the area of emergency preparedness, LA Metro has an emergency operations plan, continuity of  operations plan and standard operating procedures for shutting down services quickly and safely in the  event of an earthquake.  They have a combined emergency operations center and bus/rail operations  center to manage services during emergency events.  The agency also participates as a member of the  California Disaster and Civil Defense Master Mutual Aid Agreement. In addition, LA Metro has an active  personnel training/drill program and participates in public awareness events to inform the public  regarding what to expect during an earthquake and how to protect themselves if using LA Metro  services during an earthquake.    References  1. Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2012. Climate Action and Adpatation Plan. Mtero. [Online] June 2012. [Cited: March 14, 2016.]  media.metro.net/projects_studies/sustainability/images/Climate_Action_Plan.pdf.  2. Liban, Cris B., Matthew Egge, and Carley Markovitz. 2013. Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority Climate Change Adaptation Pilot Project. U.S. Department of Transportation,  Federal Transit Administration. [Online] August 2013. [Cited: March 14, 2016.]  www.fta.dot.gov/documents/FTA_Report_No._0073.pdf. 

B‐37  3. Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Resiliency Indicator Framework. Metro. [Online] December 2015. [Cited: March 14, 2016.]  https://www.metro.net/projects_studies/sustainability/images/resiliency_indicator_framework.pdf.  4. Los Angeles Couty Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2016. Environmental Compliance and Sustianability Department. Mtero. [Online] [Cited: March 14, 2016.]  https://www.metro.net/projects/ecsd/. 

Next: Maryland Transit Administration (MTA) »
Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Web Only Document 70: Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies includes appendicies that outline the literature reviewed and 17 case studies that explore how transit agencies absorb the impacts of disaster, recover quickly, and return rapidly to providing the services that customers rely on to meet their travel needs. The report is accompanied by Volume 1: A Guide, Volume 2: Research Overview, and a database called resilienttransit.org to help practitioners search for and identify tools to help plan for natural disasters.

This website is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

TRB hosted a webinar that discusses the research on March 12, 2018. A recording is available.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!