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Suggested Citation:"Workshop and Additional Interim Outreach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 2: Research Overview. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24974.
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Page 41
Page 42
Suggested Citation:"Workshop and Additional Interim Outreach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 2: Research Overview. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24974.
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Page 42

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

TCRP A-41: Final Research Report 41 Workshop and Additional Interim Outreach Research for the project included a workshop with two objectives: to pilot the Guidebook organization and content and to obtain feedback from transit industry professionals. The workshop was held on Sunday, July 10, 2016, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, as one of the pre-conference workshops offered by the TRB 11th National Conference on Transportation Asset Management. The 33 attendees represented: 14—transit organizations; 6––private sector companies, or were themselves consultants 5––state DOTs; 3––federal agencies (FTA and FHWA); 3––educational organizations (institutes or universities); and 2––no affiliation disclosed. After three hours of mixed presentation by the team and animated discussion by participants, it was clear that many people would have stayed longer had the room not been required for another event. Some participants asked where and when other similar opportunities to get information and exchange experience and questions with industry colleagues might be available. The chief lesson for the team was how much desire exists for training and discussion on the topic of transportation resilience. Although the focus of the workshop was transit, other participants––especially DOTs––contributed information, lessons learned, and anecdotes from related experience. The workshop focused on five objectives and a closing questionnaire tested response.  Consider different definitions of transit system resilience and the domains of resilience adoption. Most participants rated themselves as having medium knowledge of transit system planning at the beginning of the workshop, and at the end rated their knowledge (as stated in the objective ) as between 4 and 5 on a scale where five is strongest. Increased understanding was the highest rated result from the workshop.  Explore which pathway to resilience might be right for your transit agency. Participants agreed this objective was met (4+ of 5).  Learn four basic steps to chart a course to resilience. Participants rated this 4+ of 5.  Understand regional and multi-sector context of interdependencies to promote regional resilience. This objective generated spirited discussion and mixed results, largely 4s.  Learn about tools and resources to help your agency achieve its resilience goals. Information presented on this was general (specifics not yet developed), but response was interested and participants rated the potential usefulness of the Guidebook to their agencies as 4-5. Participants also indicated the workshop showed ways to explore resilience planning in participants’ organizations, gave them ideas about which approaches might work for them, and shaped their thinking about resilience planning. The majority of respondents said resilience had not been a priority in comprehensive planning in their organizations. The presentation slides for the Workshop summarized the proposed content and organization of the Guidebook. The positive reception at the workshop confirmed the team plan. The presentation slides are included on the Webpage.

TCRP A-41: Final Research Report 42 In addition to the workshop, the framework and basic content for the Guidebook were presented at two APTA Committee Conferences, as part of regular sessions. This included the APTA Sustainability Conference in Austin, Texas (July 24 to 27, 2016) and the APTA Multimodal Conference in Calgary, Alberta, (July 31 to August 3.) Attendees expressed great interest in seeing the completed Guidebook.

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Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 2: Research Overview Get This Book
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TRB's Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Web Only Document 70: Improving the Resilience of Transit Systems Threatened by Natural Disasters, Volume 2: Research Overview summarizes elements of the research effort that offers practices for transit systems of all sizes to absorb the impacts of disaster, recover quickly, and return rapidly to providing the services that customers rely on to meet their travel needs. It also explores additional research needs that have been identified during the course of the study. The report is accompanied by Volume 1: A Guide, Volume 3: Literature Review and Case Studies, and a database called resilienttransit.org to help practitioners search for and identify tools to help plan for natural disasters.

This website is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

TRB hosted a webinar that discusses the research on March 12, 2018. A recording is available.

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