National Academies Press: OpenBook

Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States (2018)

Chapter: Appendix A: Acronyms and Abbreviations

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24987.
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APPENDIX A

Acronyms and Abbreviations

AGAGE Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment
AMB aircraft mass balance
ARS Agricultural Research Service
CAIT Climate Analysis Indicators Tool
CALMIM CAlifornia Landfill Methane Inventory Model
CARB California Air Resources Board
CI confidence interval
CL confidence level
CMB chemical mass balance
COBRA-NA CO2 Boundary Layer Regional Airborne–North America
CSIRO Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Australia
DE digestible energy
DiAL differential absorption Lidar
DMI dry matter intake
DOE U.S. Department of Energy
EDGAR Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research
EF emission factor
EIA Energy Information Administration
EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
EREF Environmental Research and Education Foundation
ESRL Earth System Research Laboratory
FOD first-order decay model
FTIR Fourier-transform infrared
G&B gathering and boosting
GAINS Greenhouse gas and Air pollutant Interactions and Synergies
GCP Global Carbon Project
GEI gross energy intake
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24987.
×
GeoCARB Geostationary Carbon Cycle Observatory
GF GreenFeed®
GGRN Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network
GHG greenhouse gas
GHGI U.S. Greenhouse Gas Inventory
GHGRP Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program
GOSAT Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite
GRACEnet Greenhouse gas Reduction through Agricultural Carbon Enhancement network
GRI Gas Research Institute
GWP global warming potential
HB high bleed
IB intermittent bleed
IEA International Energy Agency
InGOS Integrated Non-CO2 Greenhouse gas Observing System
INSTAAR Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research
IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
LB low bleed
LCA life-cycle analysis
LMOP Landfill Methane Outreach Program
LULUCF land use, land use change, and forestry
MCF methane conversion factor
MSHA U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration
NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration
NASS National Agricultural Statistics Service
NGOs nongovernmental organizations
NGPL natural gas plant liquid
NGPP natural gas power plant
NOAA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
NSF National Science Foundation
OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
OSSE observation system simulation experiments
OTM other test method
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24987.
×
PTW pump-to-wheels
SCIAMACHY Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography
SIT State Inventory Tool
STEWARDS Sustaining the Earth’s Watersheds, Agricultural Research Data System
TANSO-FTS Thermal and Near Infrared Sensor for Carbon Observation
TCA tracer correlation approach
TCCON Total Carbon Column Observing Network
TROPOMI TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument
UN United Nations
UNFCCC United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
USDA U.S. Department of Agriculture
VOCs volatile organic compounds
VRPM vertical radial plume mapping
VS volatile solids
WDCGG World Data Centre for Greenhouse Gases
WIP waste in place
WRF-STILT Weather Research and Forecasting—Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport
WRI World Resources Institute
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24987.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24987.
×
Page 209
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24987.
×
Page 210
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24987.
×
Page 211
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24987.
×
Page 212
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Understanding, quantifying, and tracking atmospheric methane and emissions is essential for addressing concerns and informing decisions that affect the climate, economy, and human health and safety. Atmospheric methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that contributes to global warming. While carbon dioxide is by far the dominant cause of the rise in global average temperatures, methane also plays a significant role because it absorbs more energy per unit mass than carbon dioxide does, giving it a disproportionately large effect on global radiative forcing. In addition to contributing to climate change, methane also affects human health as a precursor to ozone pollution in the lower atmosphere.

Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States summarizes the current state of understanding of methane emissions sources and the measurement approaches and evaluates opportunities for methodological and inventory development improvements. This report will inform future research agendas of various U.S. agencies, including NOAA, the EPA, the DOE, NASA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

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