National Academies Press: OpenBook

Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States (2018)

Chapter: Appendix E: Acknowledgment of Those Who Provided Input to the Committee

« Previous: Appendix D: U.S. Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Acknowledgment of Those Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24987.
×

APPENDIX E

Acknowledgment of Those Who Provided Input to the Committee

Arlene Adviento-Borbe, USDA ARS

Sourish Basu, NOAA

Frank Caponi, Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts

JP Cativiela, Dairy Cares

Cynthia Cory, California Farm Bureau Federation

Ed Dlugokencky, NOAA

Marc Fischer, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Johannes Friedrich, World Resources Institute

Deborah Gordon, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Roger Green, Waste Management, Inc.

Abhinav Guha, Bay Area Air Quality Management District

Deanna Haines, American Gas Association

Steve Hamburg, Environmental Defense Fund

Matthew Harrison, AECOM

Garvin Heath, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Scott Herndon, Aerodyne

Robert Jackson, Stanford University

Kris Johnson, Washington State University

Özgen Karacan, U.S. Geological Survey

Kerry Kelly, Waste Management, Inc.

Joseph King, ARPA-E

David McCabe, Clean Air Task Force

Ryan McCarthy, California Air Resources Board

Jana Milford, University of Colorado Boulder

Chris Moore, Gas Technology Institute

Robert O’Keefe, Health Effects Institute

Gaby Petron, NOAA

Diego Rosso, University of California Irvine

Martha Rudolph, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

Stefan Schwietzke, NOAA

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Acknowledgment of Those Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24987.
×

Paul Shepson, Purdue University

Tim Skone, National Energy Technology Laboratory

Robert Smith, U.S. Department of Transportation

Bryan Staley, Environmental Research & Education Foundation

Rick Todd, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Juan Tricarico, Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy

Louie Tupas, USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Nazli Yesiller, California Polytechnic State University

Dan Zimmerle, Colorado State University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Acknowledgment of Those Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24987.
×
Page 223
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Acknowledgment of Those Who Provided Input to the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24987.
×
Page 224
Next: Appendix F: Common Units for Reporting Methane Concentrations and Emissions »
Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $90.00 Buy Ebook | $74.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Understanding, quantifying, and tracking atmospheric methane and emissions is essential for addressing concerns and informing decisions that affect the climate, economy, and human health and safety. Atmospheric methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that contributes to global warming. While carbon dioxide is by far the dominant cause of the rise in global average temperatures, methane also plays a significant role because it absorbs more energy per unit mass than carbon dioxide does, giving it a disproportionately large effect on global radiative forcing. In addition to contributing to climate change, methane also affects human health as a precursor to ozone pollution in the lower atmosphere.

Improving Characterization of Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States summarizes the current state of understanding of methane emissions sources and the measurement approaches and evaluates opportunities for methodological and inventory development improvements. This report will inform future research agendas of various U.S. agencies, including NOAA, the EPA, the DOE, NASA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!