National Academies Press: OpenBook

Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report (2018)

Chapter: 4.0 Research Findings Relevant to Developing the Toolbox

« Previous: 3.0 Research Results
Page 94
Suggested Citation:"4.0 Research Findings Relevant to Developing the Toolbox." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 94
Page 95
Suggested Citation:"4.0 Research Findings Relevant to Developing the Toolbox." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 95
Page 96
Suggested Citation:"4.0 Research Findings Relevant to Developing the Toolbox." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 96
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"4.0 Research Findings Relevant to Developing the Toolbox." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 97
Page 98
Suggested Citation:"4.0 Research Findings Relevant to Developing the Toolbox." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 98
Page 99
Suggested Citation:"4.0 Research Findings Relevant to Developing the Toolbox." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 99
Page 100
Suggested Citation:"4.0 Research Findings Relevant to Developing the Toolbox." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 100
Page 101
Suggested Citation:"4.0 Research Findings Relevant to Developing the Toolbox." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24992.
×
Page 101

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

NCHRP 0 4.0 R The  litera informant the state‐ The  Rese developm effective  proactive  among ot methods  being  und Toolbox  a relationsh matter pr As  the  R practices” descriptio addressin limitation approach  several  Checklists Table 8 lis Toolbox b in the pre short title The  follow and  issue literature  practice in and  issue from  the  Review  (l Environm 3.3. State for Guida lists  the  t using  the related  to brevity.    each  quo theme.   8‐100: Environm esearch F ture  review, s and, subse of‐the‐practi arch  Team  c ent of  selec practices  an involvement her topics.  A and approac ertaken  in  s re  intended ips between esented in th esearch  Team , the Toolbo ns  of  data  g  environme s,  benefits,  or  practice elements,  , Reference T ts the types  ased on the  ceding sectio s are referred ing section  s  in  need  of review,  con terviews wit s  are  revisit sections  abo iterature  rev ental Docum ‐of‐Practice I nce (interview ools  that add   short  titles  ols  are  gro Thus  not  ev te,  but  all  t ental Justice A indings   the  conten quently, the  ce and effect oncluded  th t  Toolbox  ele d  case  exam  processes, a n important  hes as well a elect  region   to  promot  these exemp e 8‐step proc   assessed  x elements w sources  and nt  justice  i lessons  learn .    As  noted including  T ables, and Sc and titles of t research and  ns of the Res  to the narra presents maj   tool  develo tent  review h key inform ed  by way  o ve:  3.1.  Sum iew), 3.2.  Su ent Review  ( nterviews:  P s).  The text ress  the  issu from  Table  uped  for  pu ery  tool me ools  mentio nalyses When C Relevant t  review  of  content revie ive practices at  the  stand ments  that  ples  on  seve nd evaluation goal of the T s highlight m s  or  on  selec e  awareness lar practices ess framewo gaps  in  info ere develop   methods,  e n  a  tolling  ed,  and  po ,  the  Toolbo ools,  Case  enarios.    ools develop interviews d earch Report tive below.   or themes, k pment  draw   and  the  s ants.  The ma f  brief  exam mary  of  the mmary of Pl document  re erceived Gap  box in each  es,  in whole 8. Major  t rposes  of  c ntioned may ned  support onsidering Toll I to Develo technical  re w of toll‐rela  in the treatm ard  of  pract provided  de ral  topics,  in  criteria for  oolbox elem ore  innovat t  projects.      of  appropr  and expand  rk of the Gui rmation  and ed.   These e xplained  wh context  and tential  resou x  contains  Examples,  ed for the  ocumented  . The ey  findings  n  from  the  tate‐of‐the‐ jor themes  ple  quotes    Literature  anning  and  views) and  s and Need  theme area   or  in part,  hemes  and  ontext  and    pertain  to    the  major  mplementation ping the ports,  the  st ted travel su ent of EJ co ice  could  be tailed discus cluding  data making and d ents has bee ive,  inclusive The  tools  an iate  standar upon and re debook.     practices,  a lements offe y  particular  ,  as  approp rces  and  co Introducti The Toolbo Checklists,  Scenarios. C as “tools” ( The designated The glass icon r  The Checklists.  The t Tables.    The  involvemen Case Examp (There is no  or Rate Change Toolbox ructured  int rveys sugges nsideration in   raised,  in  sions  of  app   sources,  an ocumenting n to describe  and compre d  case  study ds  of  practi inforce the th nd  identifie red key defin approaches  riate,  highli sts  of  unde on to Toolbo x includes Too Reference Tab ollectively, th lower case) in   toolbox icon   Tools in the T  open book w efers to Case E  checklist icon able icon refe people icon re t. It can accom le.    icon for scen sPage   Pa erviews  wit ted gaps bet  a tolling co part,  throug ropriate met alytical met  an EJ assess  key assump hensive pra   examples  i ce  and  show emes and su d  emerging  itions, gave  are  effectiv ghted  challe rtaking  a  sp x Wayfinding ls, Case Examp les, and  ey are referre the Guideboo refers to the  oolbox.   ith magnifying xamples.    refers to  rs to Referenc fers to public  pany a Tool o arios.)  ge 94  h  key  ween  ntext.   h  the  hods,  hods,  ment,  tions,  ctices  n  the    the  bject  “best  fuller  e  for  nges,  ecific    les,  d to  k.    e  r a 

 NCHRP 0 Table 8. S Tool  Type                                 8‐100: Environm ummary of T Preparing Developin Inventory Using Pub Characte Using the Characte Using Foc Designing Behavior  Using Tra Applying  Analyzing Assessing Evaluatin Institutin Toll Acco Recycling Assistanc Examinin Tolling Fa Conducti Minneap ental Justice A oolbox Tools , Implementin g a Socioecon  for EJ Assessm lic Use Microd ristics and Diff  National Hou ristics and Diff us Groups in A  and Impleme for EJ Analyse vel Demand M a Select Link A  the Value of T  User Costs an g Disproportio g Cash Replen unts for Unban  Tolling Reven e as Forms of  g the Spatial P cilities from A ng Citizen Pan olis‐St. Paul Re nalyses When C , Case Exam Tool T g, and Assessi omic Profile a ents   ata Samples t erences   sehold Travel S erences  ssessing the I nting Surveys  s and to Monit odels for EJ A nalysis to Asse ime / Willingn d Household B nate Effects  w ishment Optio ked and Unde ue through Tra Mitigation  atterns and Di vailable Recor els to Explore  gion, Minneso onsidering Toll I ples, Checklis itle  ng a Public Inv nd Community o Profile Trans urvey to Prof mpact of Tollin to Assess Attit or Implement ssessments  ss Trip Patter ess to Pay in E urden Effects ith Quantitat ns to Mitigate  rbanked Popu nsit Investme stribution of U ds  Key Issues of V ta   mplementation ts, Referenc olvement Plan  Characteristi portation  ile Transportat g on EJ Popul udes and Trav ation  ns  J Assessment     ive Methods  Barriers to Us lations  nt and Low‐In sers on Opera alue Pricing,   or Rate Change e Tables and Shor    Pub cs  ComChar Inve Usin ion  Usin ations  Focu el  Con Trav Sele s  VOT User Disp Effe e of  Rep come  Recy ting  User Mon Citiz sPage   Pa  Scenarios  t Title    lic Involvemen munity  acteristics  ntory  g PUMS  g NHTS  s Groups  ducting Survey el Demand Mo ct Link Analysi  / Willing to Pa  Costs, HH Bu roportionate  cts  lenishment Op cling Toll Reve  Activity  itoring  en Panels MN ge 95  t Plan  s  dels  s  y  rden  tions  nue   

NCHRP 0 Tool  Type   8‐100: Environm Using an  Metro Re Mobilizin Louisville Targeting Louisville Selecting Mitigate  Crossing, Analyzing Commute Mitigatin Region  Conducti and Opin Checklist  1a. Syste 1b. Conte 1c. Stage  Checklist  Applicabl Decisionm Stage 1 (P Decisionm Stage 2 (P Decisionm Stage 3 (I Examples EJ Assess Qualitativ Scenario  Scenario  Scenario  ental Justice A EJ Index to Ide gion NCTCOG  g a Local Liaiso ‐Southern Indi  Local Grocery ‐Southern Indi  a Design Alter Adverse Effect  Clay and St. Jo , Mitigating, a rs, I‐10 and I‐ g Reduced Acc ng Pre‐and Pos ions, Atlanta R 1 ‐‐ Project Fra m Attributes  xt Considerati of Decisionma 2 ‐‐ Document e Requiremen akers and Sta olicy and Plan akers and Sta roject Design akers and Sta mplementatio  of Resource T ment Methods e versus Quan A: Untolled Br B: Scenario B:  C: Rate Chang nalyses When C Tool T ntify Affected n to Recruit C ana Ohio Rive  Stores to Adm ana Ohio Rive native that Av s to a Low‐Inc hns Counties, nd Monitoring 110 ExpressLa ess via Toll Cre t‐Implementa egion, I‐85 Co ming Checklis ons  king  ation Checklis ts Governing T keholders: Ac ning)  keholders: Ac —including NE keholders: Ac n)  opic Consider  by Resource  titative Evalua idge to Tolled  HOV Lanes to  e  onsidering Toll I itle  Populations, D ommunity Lea r Bridges Proje inister Comm r Bridges Proje oids the Tolls f ome Commun  Florida    Impacts on Lo nes, Los Angel dits, Dallas‐Fo tion Surveys o rridor   ts: t   olling Projects tions, Decision tions, Decision PA)  tions, Decision ations Added b Topic Area  tions of Resou Bridge, P3  HOT Lanes  mplementation allas‐Fort Wo ders for Surve ct  unity Surveys, ct  or a Local Trip ity, St. Johns R w‐Income  es County   rt Worth Met f Traveler Beh   s, and Concer s, and Concer s, and Concer y Tolling  rce Topics   or Rate Change Shor rth  EJ In y,  Surv Liais   Surv Stor  to  iver  Avo Full  Cou ro  Miti avior  Pre & Atla Proj Chec EJ D Chec Req ns for  Polic Stak ns for  Proj Stak ns for  Imp Stak Tolli Asse Qua Qua Scen Scen Scen sPage   Pa t Title   dex NCTCOG eys with Local on KY‐IN  eys at Grocery es KY‐IN  id Impacts FL B Cycle I‐10‐I‐11 nty  gation NCTCO  Post Surveys nta  ect Framing  klists  ocumentation klist  uirements  y & Planning  eholder Intere ect Design  eholder Intere lementation  eholder Intere ng Considerat ssment Metho litative vs.  ntitative  ario A  ario B  ario C  ge 96      ridge  0 LA  G      sts  sts  sts  ions  ds 

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 97  4.1 Engage in Meaningful Public Involvement with Low‐Income and Minority Populations Literature  Review:    The  reviewed  toll  pricing  literature  mentions  some  stakeholder  or  outreach  engagement  processes,  but  does  not  typically  describe  practical  approaches  taken  for  specifically  involving  traditionally  disadvantaged  populations,  such  as  low‐income  and  minority populations in decision‐making processes.  Content Reviews:    Some  reports  mentioned  public  involvement strategies  that  were  part  of  the  report development  process  designed  to  solicit input/feedback  as  part  of  the  document generation.    Some  reports  included  public  involvement  but  to  a  lesser  degree;  making reference  to  other  reports  that  included  an outreach  or  survey  component  and merely  citing the outcomes/findings.   The remaining reports did not  include  any  public  involvement  component, neither conducted as part of the process nor referenced in another study/report.  In a few of the reviewed technical reports, there were discussions of some targeted efforts to provide information and solicit feedback from EJ communities. 4.1.1 Interviews Theme #2: Continuing Challenges with Inclusive Public Outreach:  "Hierarchy  of  Needs"  Problem.    Citizens  dealing  with  poverty  need  to  have  more options/methods of participation, as they have many things competing for their time and may not have the luxury of being able to participate in traditional meetings.  Greater Use of Focus Groups, Panels, and Citizen  Juries.   There  is not enough  input from the people that will be using the end product, and public involvement tools such as these allow for meaningful public input. 4.1.2 Interviews Theme #5: Database of Existing Analysis and Mitigation Strategies  Need Survey Research Studies of Minority and  Low‐Income Users and Attitudes  toward Toll Roads  in Operation.   One agency interviewee found survey data reporting toll road usage that compared  low‐income  traveler  usage  to  other  populations  to  be  among  the most  useful  in developing  their  impact  analyses.    They  would  like  to  see  more  information  summarized concisely in an accessible manner. Example tools addressing the issues:   Public Involvement Plan  Focus Groups  Conducting Surveys  Citizen Panels MN  Surveys with Local Liaison KY‐IN  Surveys at Grocery Stores KY‐IN  Pre and Post Surveys Atlanta  Documentation Checklist (Checklist 2)  Requirements, Policy & Planning Stakeholder Interests  Policy & Planning Stakeholder Interests  Implementation Stakeholder Interests

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 98  4.2 Define Appropriate Study Areas – Size, Level or Detail and Related Demographic Characteristics Literature Review: The literature suggests that barriers to  the acquisition of transponders and toll accounts for low‐ income people should be recognized and addressed.  As it  affects travel patterns and the assessment of impacts, the  policies and attributes of toll accounts should be addressed  as early as possible – as part of the project action or  alternatives under consideration during the environmental  review process and before the issuance of a record of  decision.  Content Reviews:    Most  studies  identified  the  thresholds  that were used  to  determine what  constituted  an  “EJ community” or community of concern.  There is no uniform method for establishing the census  geography or criteria for making this threshold determination.      Nearly all of the technical studies and reports reviewed make use of demographic  information from  the U.S. Census Bureau.   Predominantly,  this data  is used  to determine  low‐income and minority populations.    In nearly all of  the studies reviewed, “low‐income”  is defined using the poverty threshold used by the Census Bureau as defined by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Data from either the decennial census or the American Community Survey was used, depending on data availability.  Definitions and methods for identifying affected populations or communities of concern through spatial mapping  greatly  vary.    First,  the  selection of  the  “study  area”  in many of  the  studies refers  to  a  buffered  area  surrounding  the  proposed  improvement/  toll  implementation. Oftentimes these buffered areas ranged in size, from as small as 1,500 feet to a ½ mile.   While many current and/or potential facility users may begin future trips from this area, it represents a small segment of the catchment area of potential users. 4.2.1 Interview Theme 3: Need for Modeling and Analytical Tools that Can Address EJ and Equity  Need  for  Regional  Tolling  Analysis.    Tolling  Projects  do  not  exist  in  a  vacuum  and  it  is appropriate to place the project in regional context; regional network analyses are preferable to  project specific studies for describing analyses and the rationale for preferred alternatives.   Example tools addressing the issues:   Community Characteristics Inventory  Using PUMS  Using NHTS  Travel Demand Models  Project Framing Checklist (Checklist 1)

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 99  4.3 Evaluate Travel Patterns, with and Without the Project, by Income Level Literature review:    Income  equity  analysis  would  be  improved  by further refinements  to travel demand models  that  support income segmentation.     In  a  study  of  methods  on  congestion  pricing projects  for  the  FHWA,  researchers  (Burt  et  al., 2010)  recommended  that  an  assessment  of  EJ impacts  is  necessary  to  conduct  a  comprehensive travel  impacts  evaluation,  including  as  many potentially  significant  project‐related  travel changes as possible. 4.3.1 Interview Theme 3: Need for Modeling and Analytical Tools that Can Address EJ and Equity:  Better Tool  for Determining Price‐based Behavior.   Agencies tend  to rely upon existing travel demand models to predict socioeconomic behavior before and after toll pricing implementation.   Interviewees asserted that agencies should require more  input from people via survey or data  from existing tolled roads to apply to the model.    4.4 Evaluate Impacts Including Disproportionate Impacts Content reviews:    Several  reports  lacked  analytical  rigor  in  making their  assessment  of  EJ  impacts,  doing  little more  than  identifying and mapping  the  location of  low‐ income  and  minority  populations.    The  data  sources  and methods presented  for  these  reports  are  generally  census  information  overlaid  with  project  boundaries  and  defining  thresholds  for  poverty and minority status determination.   These  reports  did  not  include  much  travel‐related  information.    4.4.1 Interviews Theme #1: More Federal Guidance:  “How to” Guidance Needed for Conducting EJ Analysis.  Prior FHWA and resource guidance on equity  in a tolling context was focused on what has been done, or could be done, but was not  particularly instructive on how it should be done.  Very little information was presented within  an  EJ  framework.    It  was  difficult  to  find  examples  of  the  "how‐to"  in  analyzing  and  characterizing  the magnitude  or  severity  of  impacts  on  EJ  populations  vis‐à‐vis  the  general  population.    Additionally,  examples  were  lacking  on  how  to  comprehensively  evaluate  and  account for offsetting benefits and mitigation measures in making a finding determination.  4.4.2 Interviews Theme #5: Database of Existing Analysis and Mitigation Strategies  Examples of  EJ Analysis Methods Related  to  Tolling Projects.   Agency  interviewee observed that  they  had  to  develop  a  lot  of  their  analytical methods  from  scratch.    They  found  the  outreach work done in LA and Atlanta particularly interesting.    Example tools addressing the issues:   VOT/ Willing to Pay  User Costs/ HH Burden  Disproportionate Impacts  Tolling Considerations  Assessment Methods  Qualitative vs. Quantitative Example tools addressing the issues:   Using PUMS  Using NHTS  Travel Demand Models  Select Link Analysis  VOT/ Willing to Pay  User Costs/ HH Burden

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 100  4.5 Identify Potential Mitigation Measures Literature review:    The  literature  suggests  that  barriers  to  the acquisition  of  transponders  and  toll  accounts  for low‐income  people  should  be  recognized  and addressed.  Select systems have been designed  to ensure  that people  without  access  to  credit  cards  or  bank accounts are able to use transponders despite not having  credit  or  debit  cards.    Puerto  Rico’s  Auto Expreso and Florida Turnpike’s SunPass are examples that permit reloading of transponders with cash (e.g., through kiosk terminals at retail and other convenient locations). 4.5.1 Interviews Theme #5: Database of Existing Analysis and Mitigation Strategies  Toolbox  of  Mitigation  Strategies.    Agencies  and  practitioners  could  use  a  well‐developed database  of  tools  and  techniques  and mitigation  strategies  that  practitioners  could  utilize  in examining impacts and developing solutions based on their unique context.  Difficult  to Find Good Examples of Analysis and Mitigation Techniques.   A database or some sort of tool that would give examples of similar situations and ways in which the mitigation was addressed and implemented would be very useful. 4.6 Document the Process and Findings Literature review:    When  there  are  minority  and  low‐income  populations  in  the  study  area  that  may  be adversely impacted, there are some steps to follow to determine whether there is a disproportionately high and adverse impact on the population: Explain Coordination, Access  to  Information,  and  Participation.    The NEPA  document  should  include discussion of major proactive efforts to ensure meaningful opportunities for public participation including activities to increase low‐income and minority participation.  Include in the document the  views  of  the  affected  population(s)  about  the  project  and  any  proposed mitigation,  and describe what  steps  are  being  taken  to  resolve  any  controversy  that  exists.   Document  the degree  to which  the  affected  groups  of minority  and/or  low‐income  populations  have  been involved in the decision‐making process related to the alternative selection, impact analysis, and mitigation.  Literature  review:  “Disproportionately  high  and  adverse  effects”  are  defined....    EJ considerations should be summarized in the appropriate section of the NEPA document….Under  NEPA, consideration must be given to mitigation… for all adverse effects regardless of the type  of  population  affected.    Discuss  (document)  what  measures  are  being  considered  for  alternatives to avoid or mitigate the adverse effects.  Example tools addressing the issues:   Replenishment Options  Recycling Toll Revenue  Avoid Impacts FL Bridge  Full Cycle I‐10‐I‐110 LA County  Mitigation NCTCOG Example tools addressing the issues:  Documentation Checklist (Checklist 2)  Requirements

NCHRP 08‐100: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate ChangesPage   Page 101  4.7 Implement Ongoing Monitoring Literature review:    Post‐implementation evaluation and monitoring is an important feature of the FHWA UPA/CRD programs.    The  introduction  of  before‐after  travel  survey  methods  appear  to  validate  the feasibility  of  periodic  equity  assessment  and  compliance  monitoring  for  examining  the characterization of impacts and the effectiveness and limitations of toll implementation.  One means  for addressing  this gap  in knowledge would  be  the  use  of  an  equity  audit  tool  after implementation of road pricing projects.  Through periodic monitoring of project effects, the success of mitigation measures  and whether  differences in  equity  are being  effectively  addressed  can be examined.    When  persistent  inequities  are revealed  in  the monitoring  phase, modifications to  road  pricing  and  mitigation  can  be subsequently made (Ecola and Light, 2009).  Post‐implementation assessments have been relatively limited.  These studies appear to report on  the  utilization  of  the  facility  by  broad  income  segments  of  users  –  not  necessarily  “low‐ income” as defined under the U.S. DOT or FHWA Order on Environmental Justice.  In focusing on utilization,  they  also  do  not  tend  to  examine  differences  in  individual  or  household  financial cost‐burden effects. Example tools addressing the issues:   User Activity Monitoring  Pre and Post Surveys Atlanta  Conducting Surveys  Implementation Stakeholder Interests  Requirements

Next: 5.0 Identified Needs for Future Research »
Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Web-Only Document 237: Environmental Justice Analyses When Considering Toll Implementation or Rate Changes—Final Report presents information gathered in the development of NCHRP Research Report 860: Assessing the Environmental Justice Effects of Toll Implementation or Rate Changes: Guidebook and Toolbox. This web-only document summarizes the technical research and presents the technical memorandum that documents the literature, existing case studies, resource documents, and other reports compiled.

NCHRP Research Report 860 provides a set of tools to enable analysis and measurement of the impacts of toll pricing, toll payment, toll collection technology, and other aspects of toll implementation and rate changes on low-income and minority populations.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!