National Academies Press: OpenBook

Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop (2018)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters

« Previous: Appendix B: Workshop Agenda
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25009.
×

Appendix C

Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters

Nancy Tippins (Chair, Steering Committee) is a principal consultant at CEB Valtera, a human consulting and technology corporation, where she is responsible for talent acquisition strategies related to workforce planning, sourcing, acquisition, selection, competency identification, succession planning, and employee and leadership development. She is a member and served as president of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and she is serving on its committee to revise Principles for the Validation and Use of Personnel Selection. She also served on the joint committee of the American Psychological Association for the 2014 revision of the Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests. She has a B.A. in history from Agnes Scott College, an M.Ed. in counseling and psychological services from Georgia State University, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the Georgia Institute of Technology,

Kathy H. Abbott (Presenter) is chief scientific and technical advisor for flight deck human factors with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). She specializes in human performance and human error, systems design and analysis, flight crew training/qualification, and flight crew operations and procedures. Her work has focused on the integration of human engineering into FAA and international regulatory materials and policies for flight guidance systems, avionics, all-weather operations, required navigation performance, crew qualification, data communication, instrument procedure design criteria, electronic flight bags, electronic displays, organizational culture, design-related pilot error, and other areas. Previously she worked at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, where she was responsible for flight studies to improve aviation safety and operational efficiency.

David R. Arterburn (Member, Steering Committee) is director of the Rotorcraft Systems Engineering and Simulation Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. His work covers rotorcraft, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs), model-based systems engineering, and payloads for space- and earth-bound systems. He is currently conducting research in UAS ground collision severity and development of safety systems for UASs to reduce the potential for injury to nonparticipants during UAS operations over people. Previously, he was a master U.S. Army aviator. He has a B.S. from the U.S. Military Academy and an M.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Maryland at College Park.

Ellen Bass (Member, Steering Committee) is professor and chair of the Department of Health Systems and Sciences Research in the College of Nursing and Health Professions, professor in the Department of Information Science in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25009.
×

the College of Computing and Informatics, and affiliate faculty member in the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, all at Drexel University. The focus of her research is to develop theories of human performance, quantitative modeling methodologies, and associated experimental designs that can be used to evaluate human-automation interaction and human-human collaboration in the context of total system performance. She has a Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Kim Cardosi (Presenter) serves as principal technical advisor for aviation human factors at the U.S. Department of Transportation. She has had extensive experience with flight deck and air traffic control human factors and with research in pilot-controller communications and runway incursions. Her current work focuses on controller-pilot data link communications and Unmanned Aerial System operations. She serves on the Headquarters Contingency Action Team of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, previously known as the Space Shuttle and Space Station Mishap Investigation Board. She has a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Brown University, as well as a private pilot’s certificate.

Kurt Carraway (Presenter) is the Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) executive director of the Applied Aviation Research Center (AARC) at Kansas State University. In this position, he directs the execution of research activities involving UASs through the AARC and directs flight operations development and maturation of the UAS training program. Previously, as a U.S. Air Force colonel, he served as joint operations director and division chief of current operations for the U.S. Pacific Command. He also worked with the Global Hawk UAS program as an evaluator and instructor pilot and as commander of the Global Hawk squadron. He has a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Missouri Science and Technology in Rolla, an M.S. in systems engineering from the U.S. Air Force Institute of Technology, and an M.A. in management from Webster University.

John-Paul B. Clarke (Member, Steering Committee) is a dean’s professor in the College of Engineering and director of the Air Transportation Laboratory, and he also has appointments in the Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering and the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, all at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His work focuses on aircraft trajectory prediction and optimization, especially as it pertains to the development of flight procedures that reduce the environmental impact of aviation. One aspect of that work has been to change both the theory and the practice of flight procedure design to reduce the global environmental impact of aviation through changes in operational procedures. He has an S.B., an S.M., and an Sc.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Mary Cummings (Member, Steering Committee) is a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and the Institute of Brain Science, and she is director of the Humans and Autonomy Laboratory and Duke Robotics, all at Duke University. Previously, she was a U.S. Navy fighter pilot. Her research interests include human-unmanned vehicle interaction, human-autonomous system collaboration, human systems engineering, public policy implications of unmanned vehicles, and the ethical and social impact of technology. She has a B.S. in mathematics from the U.S. Naval Academy, an M.S. in space systems engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, and a Ph.D. in systems engineering from the University of Virginia.

Doug Davis (Member, Steering Committee) is director of the Office of Independent Airworthiness, Research, Technology, and Engineering at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems. In this position, he is responsible for all aspects of airworthiness support across the company’s aerospace systems sector, and he is also responsible for flight certification for all manned and unmanned aircraft programs. Previously, he worked at the Federal Aviation Administration in a range of positions, beginning as an air traffic controller and including serving as special assistant to the associate administrator for Air Traffic Services and as the first director of the Unmanned Aircraft Program Office. He also previously worked as the director of global unmanned aircraft systems strategic initiatives at the Physical Science Laboratory at New Mexico State University. He has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from California Pacific University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25009.
×

Mark H. Draper (Presenter) is a principal engineering research psychologist for the 711th Human Performance Wing of the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, where he also serves as the lead for applied autonomy research in the Airman Systems Directorate. In that position, he chairs a six-nation NATO research team focused on human-autonomy interaction and leads a five-nation autonomy strategic challenge program. His research interests include operator interfaces for Unmanned Aerial Systems, human-automation interaction, multimodal interfaces, and advanced interface technology design and evaluation. He is the recipient of the Harold Brown Award, the highest award given by the U.S. Air Force to a scientist or engineer. He has an M.S.E. and a Ph.D. in engineering from the University of Washington.

Mica R. Endsley (Member, Steering Committee) is president of SA Technologies, a cognitive engineering firm specializing in the analysis, design, measurement, and training of situation awareness in advanced systems, including the next generation of systems for aviation, air traffic control, health care, power grid operations, transportation, military operations, and homeland and cyber security. Her work is in the design, development, and evaluation of systems to support human situation awareness and decision making. Previously, she served as chief scientist of the U.S. Air Force, providing guidance and direction on research and development to support Air Force future operations and providing assessments on a wide range of scientific and technical issues affecting the U.S. Air Force mission. She has a Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering from the University of Southern California.

John Hansman (Member, Steering Committee) is the T. Wilson professor of aeronautics and astronautics and director of the International Center for Air Transportation at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He conducts research in the application of information technology in operational aerospace systems, and he has more than 5,800 hours of pilot-in-command time in airplanes, helicopters, and sailplanes, including meteorological, production, and engineering flight test experience. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). He has received numerous awards, including AIAA’s Dryden Lectureship in Aeronautics Research and the Kriske Air Traffic Award of the Air Traffic Control Association. He has a Ph.D. in physics, meteorology, and aeronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Robert (Rob) Hughes (Presenter) is the senior policy advisor for airworthiness and airspace integration at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, and he represents the company in industry standards bodies and advocacy organizations and on a variety of aviation rule-making committees. He also serves as cochair of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Drone Advisory Council Subcommittee of the Airspace Access Working Group of the FAA. His work focuses on the development and applications of unmanned robotic aircraft. Previously, he was a U.S. Air Force F-15 fighter pilot, and he held key positions at Boeing, Rockwell Collins, and Insitu, Inc., a designer and manufacturer of the ScanEagle and Integrator unmanned aircraft systems. He has a B.S. in chemistry from Baylor University and an M.A. in management from Webster University, and he is a U.S. Air Force dual-rated navigator and pilot with more than 4,500 flight hours.

Bill Kaliardos (Presenter) is a human factors specialist in the Aircraft Certification Service of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). He is the human factors lead for the FAA Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Program Office, and he leads the FAA’s effort to understand the human performance–related safety consequences of the UAS pilot being physically remote from the aircraft. In related work at the FAA, he addresses avionics technologies, such as human-automation interaction, alerts, controls, automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast cockpit display of traffic information, and traffic collision avoidance systems. He has undergraduate degrees in aerospace engineering and mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Marcie Langelier (Presenter) is the human systems engineering and integration team lead for Unmanned Aircraft Systems Airspace Integration Sense and Avoid of the Naval Air Systems Command. She has held a wide variety of positions across the U.S. Department of Defense, including at the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Develop-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25009.
×

ment and Engineering Center and at the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Her work focuses on human-systems integration, coordinating across the disciplines of manpower, personnel training, human factors engineering, safety and occupational/environmental health, and force protection and survivability. She has a B.A. in psychology from the University of Florida and an M.A. in industrial/organization psychology from George Mason University.

Christopher Miller (Member, Steering Committee) is chief scientist at Smart Information Flow Technologies, a research and development consulting company for automated planning, cybersecurity, supervisory control, health care, and a range of human-automation interaction technologies. Previously, he led a series of adaptive information management and human task modeling projects at the Honeywell Technology Center, including as the principal investigator for Honeywell’s role in the U.S. Army’s Rotorcraft Pilot’s Associate Program to develop and implement an information management system to coordinate information presentation and task flow between two pilots and the advanced automation systems in a next-generation attack/scout helicopter. He has a B.A. in psychology from Pomona College and a Ph.D. in cognition and communication psychology from the University of Chicago.

Amy R. Pritchett (Presenter) is chair of the Aerospace Engineering Department at Pennsylvania State University. Previously at the university, she was the David S. Lewis associate professor of cognitive engineering and a faculty member in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering. She has led numerous research projects sponsored by industry, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Federal Aviation Administration. Previously, she served as director of NASA’s Aviation Safety Program. She is the recipient of numerous awards, and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has named a scholarship for her. She has an S.B., an S.M., and a Sc.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is also a licensed pilot of airplanes and sailplanes.

Julie J.C.H. Ryan (Member, Steering Committee) is the CEO of Wyndrose Technical Group, which focuses on futures forecasting and strategic planning with an eye on technology surprise and disruption. Previously, she was a professor of cybersecurity and information assurance at the U.S. National Defense University, a faculty member at George Washington University, and a visiting scholar at the National Institute for Standards and Technology. Prior to her academic positions, she was a signals intelligence officer in the U.S. Air Force and a military intelligence officer with the Defense Intelligence Agency. She also held positions with several private companies, including Sterling Software, Booz Allen & Hamilton, and Welkin Associates. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. She has a D.Sc. in engineering management from George Washington University.

Nadine Sarter (Presenter) is a professor in the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering and the director of the Center for Ergonomics at the University of Michigan. Her primary research interests include human-automation teaming and collaboration; operator trust in highly autonomous systems; adaptive function allocation; attention/interruption management; multimodal interface design; and the design of decision aids for high-tempo operations. She has conducted her work in a variety of application domains, most notably aviation and space, medicine, military operations, and the automotive industry. She has served on numerous government and scientific committees. She has a Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering, with a specialization in cognitive systems engineering, from Ohio State University.

Jay Shively (Presenter) is the subproject manager for detect and avoid for the project on Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) integration into the National Airspace System and for the human-autonomy teaming lab at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). In this role, he leads a multidisciplinary team across four NASA research centers to address barriers impeding the integration of UASs. Previously, he was the human-systems integration group leader for the Aeroflightdynamics Directorate in the U.S. Army. In that role, he coordinated efforts on helicopter brown-out symbology, UAS ground-station design, and cockpit design issues. His research interests include human-autonomy teaming and UAS airspace integration, and he has published numerous papers, book chapters, and conference presentations.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25009.
×

Grant Taylor (Presenter) is an engineering research psychologist for the Human-Systems Interface Technical Area of the Aviation Development Directorate in the U.S. Army. His current research focuses on the development and evaluation of new system capabilities that allow a single operator to better utilize multiple Unmanned Aircraft Systems. This research includes the development of advanced automation, cognitive decision aids, and user interface designs, as well as the simulated environments in which the concepts are evaluated.

Erik Theunissen (Presenter) is a professor at the Netherlands Defense Academy and the founder of ISD, a company that offers innovation, product development, and maintenance in the field of avionics. ISD has designed synthetic vision systems for Rockwell Collins that have been flight tested in the several kinds of aircraft. Through ISD, he has been involved in the design and evaluation of detect and avoid systems for unmanned aircraft, and in the design of a conflict prediction and display system (CPDS). He has been actively involved in flight testing of CPDS at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. For his research, he has received more than 20 international awards. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Dutch National Aerospace Laboratory. He has an M.Sc. in aerospace engineering, an M.Sc. in electrical engineering, and a Ph.D. from Delft University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25009.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25009.
×
Page 51
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25009.
×
Page 52
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25009.
×
Page 53
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25009.
×
Page 54
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25009.
×
Page 55
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25009.
×
Page 56
Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration into the National Airspace System: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $75.00 Buy Ebook | $59.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Prior to 2012, unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) technology had been primarily used by the military and hobbyists, but it has more recently transitioned to broader application, including commercial and scientific applications, as well as to expanded military use. These new uses encroach on existing structures for managing the nation’s airspace and present significant challenges to ensure that UASs are coordinated safely and suitably with existing manned aircraft and air traffic management systems, particularly with the National Airspace System (NAS). Of particular concern is the interaction between human pilots, operators, or controllers and increasingly automated systems. Enhanced understanding of these interactions is essential to avoid unintended consequences, especially as new technologies emerge. In order to explore these issues, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine organized a 2-day workshop in January 2018. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!