National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 3 Coordination and Governance of Modern National Crime Statistics
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

References

Addington, L. A. (2007). Using NIBRS to study methodological sources of divergence between the UCR and NCVS. In J. P. Lynch and L. A. Addington (Eds.), Understanding Crime Statistics: Revisiting the Divergence of the NCVS and UCR, Cambridge Studies in Criminology, Chapter 8. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Akiyama, Y. and S. K. Propheter (2005, April). Methods of Data Quality Control: For Uniform Crime Reporting Programs. Washington, DC: Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Alabama Law Enforcement Agency (2016). Crime in Alabama—2015. Montgomery: Alabama Law Enforcement Agency.

Apel, T. (2015, October 1). Miss. crime stats revealing. Jackson Clarion-Ledger. Published online: http://www.clarionledger.com/story/news/2015/10/01/fbi-miss-capital-city-homicides/73181106/.

Arizona Department of Public Safety (2016). Crime in Arizona 2015. Phoenix: Access Integrity Unit, Arizona Department of Public Safety.

Bauer, L. (2004, September). Local Law Enforcement Block Grant Program, 1996–2004. NCJ 203096. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Beals, M., M. DiLiema, and M. Deevy (2015, July). Framework for a Taxonomy of Fraud. Joint collaboration of Financial Fraud Research Center at the Stanford Center on Longevity and the FINRA Investor Education Foundation. Stanford, CA: Stanford Center on Longevity.

Beck, A. (2016, August). Beyond Shrinkage: Introducing Total Retail Loss. Commissioned report. Arlington, VA: Retail Industry Leaders Association.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

Bureau of Investigation (1930a, August). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: Monthly Bulletin for August, 1930, Volume 1(1). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Bureau of Investigation (1930b, October). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: Monthly Bulletin for October, 1930, Volume 1(3). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Bureau of Investigation (1931a, June). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: Monthly Bulletin for June, 1931, Volume 2(6). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Bureau of Investigation (1931b, May). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: Monthly Bulletin for May, 1931, Volume 2(5). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Bureau of Investigation (1932, April). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: First Quarterly Bulletin, 1932, Volume 3(1). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Bureau of Investigation (1933, April). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: First Quarterly Bulletin, 1933, Volume 4(1). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Bureau of Investigation (1935, April). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: First Quarterly Bulletin, 1935, Volume 6(1). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

California Department of Justice (2014, April). Criminal Statistics Reporting Requirements. Sacramento: Bureau of Criminal Information and Analysis, Criminal Justice Statistics Center, California Department of Justice.

Central Statistics Office (2015, June). Central Statistics Office: Review of the Quality of Crime Statistics. Cork, Ireland: Government of Ireland, Central Statistics Office.

Chilton, R. and W. C. Regoeczi (2007). Impact of employment, family structure, and income on NIBRS offense, victim, offender, and arrest rates. Justice Research and Policy 9(2), 9–29.

Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking (2017, September 7). The Promise of Evidence-Based Policymaking: Report of the Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking. Washington, DC: Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking.

Criminal Justice Information Services Division (2015). UCR Program Quarterly, January 2015. Number 1. Clarksburg, WV: Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Criminal Justice Information Services Division (2016a). UCR Program Quarterly, April 2016. Number 2. Clarksburg, WV: Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Criminal Justice Information Services Division (2016b). UCR Program Quarterly, July 2016. Number 3. Clarksburg, WV: Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

Criminal Justice Information Services Division, Virginia State Police (2011, July). Virginia State Police Uniform Crime Reporting incident-based procedure guide manual. Richmond: Department of State Police.

Delaware Criminal Justice Council, Statistical Analysis Center (2016, August). Crime in Delaware 2011–2015: An Analysis of Serious Crime in Delaware. Prepared in conjunction with the State Bureau of Identification. Dover: Delaware Criminal Justice Council.

Division of Investigation (1934a, April). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: First Quarterly Bulletin, 1934, Volume 5(1). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Division of Investigation (1934b, July). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: Second Quarterly Bulletin, 1934, Volume 5(2). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Ennis, P. H. (1967, May). Criminal Victimization in the United States: A Report of a National Survey. Prepared by National Opinion Research Center and submitted to the President’s Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (1935a, July). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: Second Quarterly Bulletin, 1935, Volume 6(2). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (1935b, October). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: Third Quarterly Bulletin, 1935, Volume 6(3). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (1939). Ten Years of Uniform Crime Reporting, 1930–1939: A Report by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (1940a, April). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: First Quarterly Bulletin, 1940, Volume 11(1). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (1940b, July). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: Second Quarterly Bulletin, 1940, Volume 11(2). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (1950, April). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: Semiannual Bulletin, 1950, Volume 50(1). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (1953, January). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: Annual Bulletin, 1952, Volume 23(2). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

Federal Bureau of Investigation (1954, January). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States and Its Possessions: Annual Bulletin, 1953, Volume 24(2). Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (1958). Uniform Crime Reports for the United States: Special Issue, 1958. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (1960). Crime in the United States: Uniform Crime Reports—1960. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (1961). Crime in the United States: Uniform Crime Reports—1961. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (1970). Crime in the United States: Uniform Crime Reports—1970. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (1992). Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook: National Incident-Based Reporting System Edition. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (2004). UCR: Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (2012). Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data: Supplementary Homicide Reports, 2012. Codebook. ICPSR 35023. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [producer and distributor].

Federal Bureau of Investigation (2013). Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program—Summary Reporting System (SRS) User Manual. Version 1.0. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (2015, October 13). Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program—National Incident-Based Reporting System User Manual. Version 2.0. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Flatley, J. and J. Bradley (2013, January 24). Analysis of variation in crime trends: A study of trends in ‘comparable crime’ categories between the Crime Survey for England and Wales and the police recorded crime series between 1981 and 2011/12. Methodological note. London: Office for National Statistics.

Garda Síochána Inspectorate (2014, October). Crime Investigation Report. Dublin: Garda Síochána Inspectorate.

Greenfield, V. A. and L. Paoli (2013). A framework to assess the harms of crime. British Journal of Criminology 53, 864–885.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

Haas, S. M., J. P. Jarvis, E. Jefferis, and E. Turley (2007). Gun availability and crime in West Virginia: An examination of NIBRS data. Justice Research and Policy 9(2), 139–159.

Harrell, E. and L. Langton (2013, December). Victims of Identity Theft, 2012. NCJ 243779. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary (2012). The crime scene: A review of police crime and incident reports. London: Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary.

Hickman, M. J. (2005, July). Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program, 2005. NCJ 209333. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Humpherson, E. (2016, September 27). Assessment of statistics on recorded crime in Scotland. Letter of confirmation from Director General for Regulation, United Kingdom Statistics Authority, to Roger Halliday, Chief Statisician and Head of Performance, Scottish Government. London: United Kingdom Statistics Authority.

Idaho State Police (2017, July 1). Crime in Idaho 2016. Meridian: Bureau of Criminal Identification, Idaho State Police.

Illinois State Police (2016). Crime in Illinois 2015. Springfield: Illinois State Police. Published online in segments at http://www.isp.state.il.us/crime/cii2015.cfm.

International Association of Chiefs of Police (1929). Uniform Crime Reporting: A Complete Manual for Police; Report of the Committee on Uniform Crime Records. New York: J.J. Little and Ives Company.

Kansas Bureau of Investigation (2012, January). Kansas Incident Based Reporting System Handbook (Sixth ed.). Topeka: Kansas Bureau of Investigation.

Kentucky State Police (2014). Crime in Kentucky—2013. Frankfort, KY: Kentucky State Police.

LaFree, G. (forthcoming). The evolution of terrorism event databases. In E. Chenoweth, A. Gofas, R. English, and S. Kalyvas (Eds.), Handbook on Terrorism. New York: Oxford University Press.

LaFree, G., L. Dugan, and E. Miller (2015). Putting Terrorism in Context: Lessons from the Global Terrorism Database. London: Routledge.

Law Enforcement Support Division, Texas Department of Public Safety (2015, February 3). DPS Texas Incident Based Reporting System (TIBRS) Training and Reference Manual. Austin: Texas Department of Public Safety.

Louisiana Uniform Crime Reporting Program (2016, November 1). Crime in Louisiana 2014. Joint project of the Louisiana Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Criminal Justice and the Louisiana Sheriffs’ Association. Baton Rouge.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

Maine State Police (2016, September). Crime in Maine 2015. Augusta: Maine Department of Public Safety.

Maltz, M. D. (1999, September). Bridging Gaps in Police Crime Data: A Discussion Paper from the BJS Fellows Program. Bureau of Justice Statistics and Federal Bureau of Investigation Uniform Crime Reporting Program. NCJ 176365. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Maxfield, M. G. (1999). The National Incident-Based Reporting System: Research and policy applications. Journal of Quantitative Criminology 15(2), 119–149.

McClure, C. L. (2016). Felony Level Sex Offenses, 2015: Crime in Alaska Supplemental Report. Anchorage: Alaska Department of Public Safety.

Measure, A. C. (2014). Automated coding of worker injury narratives. In Proceedings of the Government Statistics Section, Paper prepared for the Joint Statistical Meetings. Alexandria, VA. American Statistical Association.

Michigan Incident Crime Reporting Unit (2016, May). Michigan Incident Crime Reporting (MICR) Specification Handbook. Revision of January 1998 document. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Police.

Miller, E. (2014). Patterns of Terrorism in the United States, 1970–2014. College Park, MD: National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START).

Montana Board of Crime Control (2016, August). Crime in Montana: 2014–2015 Report. Helena: Statistical Analysis Center, Montana Board of Crime Control.

Montana Board of Crime Control, Statistical Analysis Center (2015, January). Montana Incident-Based Reporting System (MTIBRS) Standards Handbook. Helena: Montana Board of Crime Control.

Municipality of Anchorage (2006, June). Domestic Violence Analysis: Incidents Reported to Police in Anchorage, Alaska—Police Response and Incident Characteristics, Fourteen Year Study, 1989–2002. Anchorage: Municipal Department of Health and Human Services.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (2016). Modernizing Crime Statistics—Report 1: Defining and Classifying Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (2017a). Federal Statistics, Multiple Data Sources, and Privacy Protection: Next Steps. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (2017b). Innovations in Federal Statistics: Combining Data Sources While Protecting Privacy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (2017c). Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency (6th ed.). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council (1976). Surveying Crime. Panel for the Evaluation of Crime Surveys. Bettye K. Eidson Penick (Ed.) and Maurice E. B. Owens III (Assoc. Ed.), Committee on National Statistics, Academy of Mathematical and Physical Sciences. Washington, DC: National Academy of Sciences.

National Research Council (2008). Surveying Victims: Options for Conducting the National Crime Victimization Survey. Panel to Review the Programs of the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Robert M. Groves and Daniel L. Cork (Eds.), Committee on National Statistics and Committee on Law and Justice, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council (2009). Ensuring the Quality, Credibility, and Relevance of U.S. Justice Statistics. Panel to Review the Programs of the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Robert M. Groves and Daniel L. Cork (Eds.), Committee on National Statistics and Committee on Law and Justice, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council (2014). Estimating the Incidence of Rape and Sexual Assault. Panel on Measuring Rape and Sexual Assault in Bureau of Justice Statistics Household Surveys. Candace Kruttschnitt, William D. Kalsbeek, and Carol C. House (Eds.), Committee on National Statistics, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

New York Office of Justice Research and Performance (2016, April). NYSIBR Data Capture Elements and Specifications. Albany: New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services. Available: http://www.criminaljustice.ny.gov/crimnet/ojsa/crimereporting/ibr_refman/NYSIBR-Data-Capture-Elements-and-Specifications.pdf.

Norton, S. and D. Delay (2012, January). Crime in New Hampshire 2011. Concord: New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies.

Ohio Department of Public Safety (2017, March). Ohio Incident Based Reporting System Data Collection and Submission Specifications. Columbus: Ohio Department of Public Safety.

Oregon Uniform Crime Reporting Program (2017). State of Oregon Report of Criminal Offenses and Arrests: 2016 Annual Report. Salem: Oregon State Police.

Paoli, L. and V. A. Greenfield (2015). Starting from the end: A plea for focusing on the consequences of crime. European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice 23, 87–100.

Poggio, E., S. Kennedy, J. Chaiken, and K. Carlson (1985, May). Blueprint for the Future of the Uniform Crime Reporting Program—Final Report of the UCR Study. NCJ 098348. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

President’s Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice (1967, February). The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Commonly known as the Crime Commission report.

Public Administration Select Committee (2014, April 9). Caught Red-Handed: Why We Can’t Count on Police Recorded Crime Statistics. Thirteenth Report of Session 2013–14; HC 760. Published by authority of the House of Commons. London: The Stationery Office Limited.

Reaves, B. A. (1993, October). Using NIBRS Data to Analyze Violent Crime. NCJ 144785. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice.

Roberts, D. J. (1997, July). Implementing the National Incident-Based Reporting System: A Project Status Report. NCJ 165581. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Sparrow, M. K. (2000). License to Steal: How Fraud Bleeds America’s Health Care System. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (2013, October). TIBRS Data Collection: An Instructional Manual for the Implementation of the Tennessee Incident Based Reporting System (12th ed.). Nashville: Tennessee Bureau of Investigation.

Thompson, M. P., L. E. Saltzman, and D. Bibel (1999). Applying NIBRS data to the study of intimate partner violence: Massachusetts as a case study. Journal of Quantitative Criminology 15(2), 163–180.

Uniform Crime Reporting Program (2016, September). Crime in Connecticut, 2015. Middletown: Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, Crimes Analysis Unit.

United Kingdom Government Statistical Service (2011, June). National Statistician’s Review of Crime Statistics: England and Wales. London: United Kingdom Statistics Authority.

United Kingdom Statistics Authority (2010, May). Overcoming Barriers to Trust in Crime Statistics: England and Wales. Monitoring Report 5. London: United Kingdom Statistics Authority.

United Kingdom Statistics Authority (2011, April). Assessment of compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics: Crime Statistics in England and Wales (produced by the Home Office). Assessment Report 102. London: United Kingdom Statistics Authority.

United Kingdom Statistics Authority (2014a, January). Assessment of compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics: Statistics on Crime in England and Wales (produced by the Office for National Statistics). Assessment Report 268. London: United Kingdom Statistics Authority.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

United Kingdom Statistics Authority (2014b, July). Statistics on Recorded Crime in Scotland: Assessment of compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics. Produced by the Scottish Government. Assessment Report 288. London: United Kingdom Statistics Authority.

U.S. Department of Defense, Inspector General (2014, October 29). Evaluation of the Defense Criminal Investigative Organizations’ Defense Incident-Based Reporting System Reporting and Reporting Accuracy. Report No. DODIG-2015-011. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Defense.

U.S. Government Accountability Office (2011, June). Organized Retail Crime: Private Sector and Law Enforcement Collaborate to Deter and Investigate Theft. GAO-11-675. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office.

U.S. Government Accountability Office (2017, September). Costs of Crime: Experts Report Challenges Estimating Costs and Suggest Improvements to Better Inform Policy Decisions. GAO-17-32. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office.

Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (2017). 2016 Crime in Washington: Annual Report. Lacey and Seattle, WA: Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs and Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission.

Wellford, C. (1982). Redesigning the Uniform Crime Reports. American Journal of Police I(II), 76–92.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
Page 73
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
Page 74
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
Page 75
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
Page 76
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
Page 77
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
Page 78
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
Page 79
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
Page 80
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25035.
×
Page 82
Next: Appendixes »
Modernizing Crime Statistics: Report 2: New Systems for Measuring Crime Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $65.00 Buy Ebook | $54.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

To derive statistics about crime – to estimate its levels and trends, assess its costs to and impacts on society, and inform law enforcement approaches to prevent it - a conceptual framework for defining and thinking about crime is virtually a prerequisite. Developing and maintaining such a framework is no easy task, because the mechanics of crime are ever evolving and shifting: tied to shifts and development in technology, society, and legislation.

Interest in understanding crime surged in the 1920s, which proved to be a pivotal decade for the collection of nationwide crime statistics. Now established as a permanent agency, the Census Bureau commissioned the drafting of a manual for preparing crime statistics—intended for use by the police, corrections departments, and courts alike. The new manual sought to solve a perennial problem by suggesting a standard taxonomy of crime. Shortly after the Census Bureau issued its manual, the International Association of Chiefs of Police in convention adopted a resolution to create a Committee on Uniform Crime Records —to begin the process of describing what a national system of data on crimes known to the police might look like.

Report 1 performed a comprehensive reassessment of what is meant by crime in U.S. crime statistics and recommends a new classification of crime to organize measurement efforts. This second report examines methodological and implementation issues and presents a conceptual blueprint for modernizing crime statistics.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!