National Academies Press: OpenBook
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page R1
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page R2
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page R3
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page R4
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page R5
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page R6
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page R7
Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page R8
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page R9
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25059.
×
Page R10

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

PREPUBLICATION COPY Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030 Committee on Science Breakthroughs 2030: A Strategy for Food and Agricultural Research Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate Board on Life Sciences Water Science and Technology Board Division on Earth and Life Studies Food and Nutrition Board Health and Medicine Division Board on Environmental Change and Society Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education A Consensus Study Report of

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001 This study was supported by the Supporters of Agricultural Research Foundation (#201701), the U.S. Depart- ment of Agriculture, the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (#2017-38886-26911), the National Science Foundation (IOS-1747820), and the Department of Energy (DE-FOA-0001820), with additional funding from the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of any organization or agency that provided support for the project. Digital Object Identifier: https://doi.org/10.17226/25059 Additional copies of this publication are available for sale from the National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, NW, Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313; http://www.nap.edu. Copyright 2018 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America Suggested Citation: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: https://doi.org/10.17226/25059. Prepublication Copy

The National Academy of Sciences was established in 1863 by an Act of Congress, signed by President Lincoln, as a private, nongovernmental institution to advise the nation on issues related to science and technology. Members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research. Dr. Marcia McNutt is president. The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to bring the practices of engineering to advising the nation. Members are elected by their peers for extraordinary contributions to engineering. Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., is president. The National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) was established in 1970 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to advise the nation on medical and health issues. Members are elected by their peers for distinguished contributions to medicine and health. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president. The three Academies work together as the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions. The National Academies also encourage education and research, recognize outstanding contributions to knowledge, and increase public understanding in matters of science, engineering, and medicine. Learn more about the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine at www. nationalacademies.org. Prepublication Copy

Consensus Study Reports published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineer- ing, and Medicine document the evidence-based consensus on the study’s statement of task by an authoring committee of experts. Reports typically include findings, conclu- sions, and recommendations based on information gathered by the committee and the committee’s deliberations. Each report has been subjected to a rigorous and independ- ent peer-review process and it represents the position of the National Academies on the statement of task. Proceedings published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medi- cine chronicle the presentations and discussions at a workshop, symposium, or other event convened by the National Academies. The statements and opinions contained in proceedings are those of the participants and are not endorsed by other participants, the planning committee, or the National Academies. For information about other products and activities of the National Academies, please visit www.nationalacademies.org/about/whatwedo. Prepublication Copy

COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE BREAKTHROUGHS 2030: A STRATEGY FOR FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH Co-Chairs JOHN D. FLOROS, New Mexico State University SUSAN R. WESSLER (NAS), University of California, Riverside Members DAVID B. ALLISON (NAM), Indiana University School of Public Health–Bloomington CORRIE C. BROWN, University of Georgia LISA GODDARD, Columbia University MARY LOU GUERINOT (NAS), Dartmouth College JANET JANSSON, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory LEE-ANN JAYKUS, North Carolina State University HELEN H. JENSEN, Iowa State University RAJIV KHOSLA, Colorado State University ROBIN LOUGEE, IBM Research GREGORY V. LOWRY, Carnegie Mellon University ALISON L. VAN EENENNAAM, University of California, Davis Staff PEGGY TSAI YIH, Study Director, Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources MARIA ORIA, Senior Program Officer, Food and Nutrition Board AMANDA PURCELL, Program Officer, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate KEEGAN SAWYER, Senior Program Officer, Board on Life Sciences ROBIN SCHOEN, Director, Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources TOBY WARDEN, Director, Board on Environmental Change and Society YASMIN ROMITTI, Research Associate, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate JENNA BRISCOE, Research Assistant, Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources ERIN MARKOVICH, Research Assistant, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate Prepublication Copy v

BOARD ON AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES Chair CHARLES W. RICE, Kansas State University, Manhattan Members SHANE C. BURGESS, University of Arizona, Tucson SUSAN CAPALBO, Oregon State University, Corvallis GAIL CZARNECKI-MAULDEN, Nestlé Purina PetCare, St. Louis, MO GEBISA EJETA, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN JAMES S. FAMIGLIETTI, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena FRED GOULD (NAS), North Carolina State University, Raleigh DOUGLAS B. JACKSON-SMITH, The Ohio State University, Wooster JAMES W. JONES (NAE), University of Florida, Gainesville STEPHEN S. KELLEY, North Carolina State University, Raleigh JAN E. LEACH, Colorado State University, Fort Collins JILL J. MCCLUSKEY, Washington State University, Richland KAREN I. PLAUT, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN JIM E. RIVIERE (NAM), Kansas State University, Manhattan Staff ROBIN A. SCHOEN, Director CAMILLA YANDOC ABLES, Senior Program Officer JENNA BRISCOE, Research Assistant KARA N. LANEY, Senior Program Officer PEGGY TSAI YIH, Senior Program Officer vi Prepublication Copy

Acknowledgments This Consensus Study Report was reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and crit- ical comments that will assist the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in making each published report as sound as possible and to ensure that it meets the institutional standards for quality, objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process. We thank the following individuals for their review of this report: Molly D. Anderson, Middlebury College Brian T. Cunningham, University of Illinois Charles J. Czuprynski, University of Wisconsin-Madison Jeffery L. Dangl (NAS), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill Mary K. Firestone (NAS), University of California, Berkeley Fred Gould (NAS), North Carolina State University Gerrit Hoogenboom, University of Florida Chandra Krintz, University of California, Santa Barbara Marc B. Parlange (NAE), Monash University Joseph D. Puglisi (NAS), Stanford University School of Medicine Donald W. Schaffner, Rutgers University Daniel Stokols, University of California, Irvine Harold M. van Es, Cornell University David Zilberman, University of California, Berkeley Although the reviewers listed above provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations of this report nor did they see the final draft before its release. The review of this report was overseen by Dr. Michael T. Clegg, University of California, Irvine, and Dr. Norman R. Scott, Cornell University. They were responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with the standards of the National Academies and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content rests entirely with the authoring committee and the National Academies. Prepublication Copy vii

Contents SUMMARY .................................................................................................................................................................. 1 1 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................ 10 Background, 10 Challenges to the U.S. Food and Agricultural System, 10 Opportunities for the Future, 14 Purpose of This Study, 15 Approach to the Task, 15 Goals for 2030, 17 Organization of the Report, 18 References, 19 2 CROPS ............................................................................................................................................................. 22 Introduction, 22 Challenges, 23 Opportunities, 25 Gaps, 29 Recommendations for Next Steps, 30 References, 31 3 ANIMAL AGRICULTURE ....................................................................................................................... 36 Introduction, 36 Challenges, 37 Research Opportunities, 40 Gaps, 46 Examples, 47 Barriers to Success, 48 Recommendations for Next Steps, 48 References, 49 4 FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ............................................................................................... 53 Introduction, 53 Challenges, 55 Scientific Opportunities, 56 Barriers to Success, 64 Recommendations, 66 References, 67 5 SOILS............................................................................................................................................................... 70 Introduction, 70 Challenges, 71 Opportunities, 74 Gaps, 77 Prepublication Copy ix

Contents Barriers to Success, 77 Recommendations for Next Steps, 79 References, 79 6 WATER-USE EFFICIENCY AND PRODUCTIVITY ....................................................................... 84 Introduction, 84 Challenges, 84 Opportunities, 86 Gaps, 88 Barriers to Success, 90 Recommendations for Next Steps, 91 References, 92 7 DATA ............................................................................................................................................................... 94 Introduction, 94 Challenges, 95 Scientific Opportunities, 98 Barriers to Success, 102 Recommendations, 103 References, 103 8 A SYSTEMS APPROACH ....................................................................................................................... 107 Introduction, 107 Challenges, 107 Opportunities, 110 Barriers to Success, 112 Recommendations, 113 References, 114 9 STRATEGY FOR 2030 ............................................................................................................................. 116 Introduction, 116 Convergence, 117 Recommendations for Strategy, 117 Further Considerations, 125 Closing Remarks, 128 References, 128 APPENDIXES A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members ....................................................................................... 130 B Open Session Meeting Agendas.................................................................................................................. 135 C Ideabuzz Submissions Synopsis and Contributors ................................................................................... 142 x Prepublication Copy

Next: Summary »
Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030 Get This Book
×
Buy Prepub | $69.00 Buy Paperback | $60.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

For nearly a century, scientific advances have fueled progress in U.S. agriculture to enable American producers to deliver safe and abundant food domestically and provide a trade surplus in bulk and high-value agricultural commodities and foods. Today, the U.S. food and agricultural enterprise faces formidable challenges that will test its long-term sustainability, competitiveness, and resilience. On its current path, future productivity in the U.S. agricultural system is likely to come with trade-offs. The success of agriculture is tied to natural systems, and these systems are showing signs of stress, even more so with the change in climate.

More than a third of the food produced is unconsumed, an unacceptable loss of food and nutrients at a time of heightened global food demand. Increased food animal production to meet greater demand will generate more greenhouse gas emissions and excess animal waste. The U.S. food supply is generally secure, but is not immune to the costly and deadly shocks of continuing outbreaks of food-borne illness or to the constant threat of pests and pathogens to crops, livestock, and poultry. U.S. farmers and producers are at the front lines and will need more tools to manage the pressures they face.

Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030 identifies innovative, emerging scientific advances for making the U.S. food and agricultural system more efficient, resilient, and sustainable. This report explores the availability of relatively new scientific developments across all disciplines that could accelerate progress toward these goals. It identifies the most promising scientific breakthroughs that could have the greatest positive impact on food and agriculture, and that are possible to achieve in the next decade (by 2030).

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!